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Susan Long [4]Susan Orpett Long [4]Susannah J. Long [1]
  1.  31
    Public Passages, Personal Passages, and Reluctant Passages: Notes on Investigating Cancer Disclosure Practices in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2000 - Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (1):3-13.
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  2.  19
    Reviewing methodologically disparate data: a practical guide for the patient safety research field.Katrina F. Brown, Susannah J. Long, Thanos Athanasiou, Charles A. Vincent, J. Simon Kroll & Nick Sevdalis - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):172-181.
  3. Commentary On Asai.Susan Long - 1996 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 6 (4):93-93.
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  4. Leadership and Gender: A Psychoanalytic Perspective.Susan Long - 1989 - Analysis (Australian Centre for Psychoanalysis) 1:101.
     
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  5.  51
    Life is More than a Survey: Understanding Attitudes toward Euthanasia in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):305-319.
    Empirical studies in bioethics, as well asclinical experience, demonstrate the existenceof inter- and intra-cultural diversity invalues and perspectives on end-of-life issues. This paper argues that while survey researchcan describe such diversity, explaining itrequires ethnographic methodology that allowsordinary people to frame the discussion intheir own terms. This study of attitudestoward euthanasia in Japan found that peopleface conflicts between deeply held values suchas life versus pain, self versus other, andburden versus self-reliance that make itdifficult to rely on a ``rational person''''approach to decision-making. (...)
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  6.  11
    Living Poorly or Dying Well: Cultural Decisions about Life-Supporting Treatment for American and Japanese Patients.Susan Orpett Long - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (3):236-250.
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  7.  7
    Social Dreaming: Philosophy, Research, Theory and Practice.Susan Long & Julian Manley - 2018 - Routledge.
    The idea of social dreaming argues that dreams are relevant to the wider social sphere and have a collective resonance that goes beyond the personal narrative. In this fascinating collection, the principles of social dreaming are explored to uncover shared anxieties and prejudices, suggest likely responses, enhance cultural surveys, inform managerial policies and embody community affiliation. Including, for the first time, a coherent epistemology to support the theoretical principles of the field, the book reflects upon and extends the theory and (...)
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  8.  39
    Ancestors, Computers, and Other Mixed Messages: Ambiguity and Euthanasia in Japan.Susan Orpett Long - 2001 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (1):62-71.
    Ethical questions about end-of-life treatment present themselves at two levels. In clinical situations, patients, families, and healthcare workers sift through ambivalent feelings and conflicting values as they try to resolve questions in particular circumstances. In a very different way, at the societal level, policy makers, lawyers, and bioethicists attempt to determine the best policies and laws to regulate practices about which there are a variety of deeply held beliefs. In the United States we have tried a number of ways to (...)
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  9.  18
    Technology and the changing practice of law: An entrée to previously inaccessible information via TRAC. [REVIEW]Linda Roberge, Susan Long, Patricia Hassett & David Burnham - 2002 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 10 (4):261-282.
    The proliferation of electronic databases is raising someimportant questions about how the evolving access to new or previously inaccessible information is likely to change the practice of law. This paper discusses TRAC, an interesting electronic source of previously inaccessible information that is currently used by members of the media, public interest groups, lawyers, and the federal government. Summaries, reports, and snapshots of TRAC's data can be accessed through a series of public web sites. TRAC's subscription service allows users access to (...)
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