5 found
Sort by:
  1. Catherine Belling (2013). Begin with a Text: Teaching the Poetics of Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (4):481-491.
    This paper suggests that the purpose of humanities teaching within medical education should be primarily to teach and promote the informed, attentive, critical, and precise reading of the multiple texts that constitute medicine as a discursive field—in short, a poetics of medicine. This claim is illustrated by reconsidering Margaret Edson’s play Wit, not as it is often used in medical education, as a cautionary tale about unprofessional behavior or as a way to inculcate “humanistic skills,” but as an analysis of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Catherine Belling (2010). The Living Dead Fiction, Horror, and Bioethics. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (3):439-451.
    The victim’s upper brain is destroyed. He’s a living corpse, but his organs are alive and warm and happy until they can be taken out by the butchers at the Institute. Karen Ann Quinlan wasn’t dead. But, terrifyingly, she wasn’t fully alive, either. Maybe she was no longer human. A smear like “death panels” emerges and catches fire because it’s fundamentally interesting. You could write a great thriller . . . about death panels. As I write, a single phrase dominates (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Catherine Belling (2005). The Purchase of Fruitfulness: Assisted Conception and Reproductive Disability in a Seventeenth-Century Comedy. Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (2-3):79-96.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. L. S. Bette Anton, DeWitt C. Baldwin Jr, Catherine Belling, Patricia Benner, Alister Browne, Devra S. Cohen & Jack Coulehan (2003). David M. Adams, Ph. D., is Professor of Philosophy at California State Poly-Technic University, Pomona. Akira Akabayashi, MD, Ph. D., is Professor in the School of Public Health at Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12:1-3.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jack Coulehan, Peter C. Williams, S. van Mccrary & Catherine Belling (2003). The Best Lack All Conviction: Biomedical Ethics, Professionalism, and Social Responsibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (01):21-38.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation