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Profile: Vinay Lal
  1. Vinay Lal (forthcoming). History and the Possibilities of Emancipation: Some Lessons From India. Journal of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research.
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  2. Vinay Lal (ed.) (2013). Dissenting Knowledges, Open Futures: The Multiple Selves and Strange Destinations of Ashis Nandy. Oup India.
    This volume is the first attempt to engage with the work of one of the most exciting thinkers or our times. The essays in the first section by Nandy are either autobiographical in nature or provide insights into his unique sensibility. The later section offers some analytical perspectives on Nandy's work by contributors including leading scholars in the academy, as well as outside it.
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  3. Vinay Lal (2005). The Tragi-Comedy of the New Indian Enlightenment: An Essay on the Jingoism of Science and the Pathology of Rationality. Social Epistemology 19 (1):77 – 91.
    Though the resurgence of Hindu nationalism as a political phenomenon is well-understood, Meera Nanda is correct in suggesting that the ascendancy of Hindutva has other dimensions, such as the avent placed by cultural nationalist on 'Vedic science'. However, apart from this rudimentary insight, Nanda's contribution, far from being a resounding demonstration of potmodernism's complicity in the projects of Hindu nationalism, is a striking testament to her own commitment to a rigidly positivist, ferociously intolerant, and intellectually sterile conception of modern science (...)
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  4. Vinay Lal (2001). Subaltern Studies and its Critics: Debates Over Indian History. History and Theory 40 (1):135–148.
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  5. Vinay Lal (2000). Gandhi and the Ecological Vision of Life. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):149-168.
    Although recognized as one of the principal sources of inspiration for the Indian environmental movement, Gandhi would have been profoundly uneasy with many of the most radical strands of ecology in the West, such as social ecology, ecofeminism, and even deep ecology. He was in every respect an ecological thinker, indeed an ecological being: the brevity of his enormous writings, his everyday bodily practices, his observance of silence, his abhorrence of waste, and his cultivation of the small as much as (...)
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