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  1.  6
    The Science in Hume's Science of Man.Tamás Demeter - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):257-271.
    This paper sketches a recently emerging divide between two interpretations of Hume's methodology and philosophy of science. On the first interpretation Hume relies on an inductive methodology and provides a dynamic theory of the mind, and his philosophy of science reflects this methodology. On the second, Hume relies on inferences to the best explanation via comparative analysis of instances, and offers an anatomy of the mind relying on a chemical and organic imagery. The paper also aspires to lean the reader's (...)
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  2.  3
    Constantine Sandis, Character and Causation: Hume's Philosophy of Action.Enrico Galvagni - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):333-338.
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  3. Introduction.Gordon Graham - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):311-313.
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  4.  2
    Education, Commerce, and Public Spirit: Craig Smith's Study of Adam Ferguson.Eugene Heath - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):313-320.
  5.  3
    Reflections on Reading Adam Ferguson.Jack A. Hill - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):320-328.
  6.  1
    The Role of Instinct in David Hume's Conception of Human Reason.James Hill - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):273-288.
    This article investigates the role of instinct in Hume's understanding of human reason. It is shown that while in the Treatise Hume makes the strong reductive assertion that reason is ‘nothing but’ an instinct, in the First Enquiry the corresponding statement has been modified in several ways, rendering the relation between instinct and reason more complex. Most importantly, Hume now explicitly recognises that alongside instinctive experimental reasoning, there is a uniquely human intellectual power of intuitive and demonstrative reason that is (...)
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  7.  5
    The Science of Human Nature in the Scottish Enlightenment.Esther Engels Kroeker - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):227-232.
  8.  1
    Reading Adam Ferguson and the Idea of Civil Society.Craig Smith - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):328-332.
  9.  1
    ‘An Authority From Which There Can Be No Appeal’: The Place of Cicero in Hume's Science of Man.Tim Stuart-Buttle - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):289-309.
    Hume's admiration for the Roman philosopher and statesman, Cicero, is well-known. Yet scholars have largely overlooked how Hume's interpretation of Cicero – initially as a Stoic, and subsequently as an academic sceptic – evolved with Hume's own intellectual development. Moreover, scholars tend to focus on Hume's debts to Cicero with regard either to his epistemological scepticism or his philosophy of religion. This essay suggests instead that Hume's engagement with Cicero was at its most intense, and productive, when evaluating the relationship (...)
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  10.  2
    Marching on the Capital: Hume's Experimental Science of Man as a Conquest for Occupied Territory.Gabriel Watts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (3):233-255.
    In this paper I set out what I call a ‘conquest’ conception of Hume's experimental science of man. It is notable, I claim, that Hume regards what he calls the ‘capital’ of the sciences – ‘the science of MAN’ – as occupied territory, and that he views his ‘direct’ method of approach upon the science of human nature as a ‘conquest’. I expand upon such statements by leveraging the comparison that Hume draws between experimental moral philosophy and the experimental tradition (...)
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  11.  8
    Revisionism Gone Awry: Since When Hasn't Hume Been a Sceptic?Adam Andreotta & Michael Levine - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):133-155.
    In this paper, we argue that revisionary theories about the nature and extent of Hume's scepticism are mistaken. We claim that the source of Hume's pervasive scepticism is his empiricism. As earlier readings of Hume's Treatise claim, Hume was a sceptic – and a radical one. Our position faces one enormous problem. How is it possible to square Hume's claims about normative reasoning with his radical scepticism? Despite the fact that Hume thinks that causal reasoning is irrational, he explicitly claims (...)
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  12.  2
    What Did Adam Smith Learn From François Quesnay?Toni Vogel Carey - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):175-191.
    Book IV of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations concerns two rival economic theories, Mercantilism and Physiocracy. The latter, François Quesnay's system, occupies only the ninth and final chapter, and it begins with a stunning dismissal. Yet, fifteen pages later, Smith praises this theory to the skies. That cries out for explanation. Like Mercantilism, Smith's system emphasizes commerce, whereas Quesnay's is confined to agriculture. But like Physiocracy, Smith's system is built on individual liberty, whereas Mercantilism is one of government control. Despite (...)
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  13.  1
    Tamás Demeter, David Hume and the Culture of Scottish Newtonianism.James J. S. Foster - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):213-218.
  14.  1
    Christian Maurer, Self-Love, Egoism and the Selfish Hypothesis: Key Debates From Eighteenth-Century British Moral Philosophy.Erin Frykholm - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):218-221.
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  15.  3
    Hume on Pride, Vanity and Society.Enrico Galvagni - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):157-173.
    Pride is a fundamental element in Hume's description of human nature. An important part of the secondary literature on Hume is devoted to this passion. However, no one, as far as I am aware, takes seriously the fact that pride often appears in pairs with vanity. In Book 2 of the Treatise, pride is defined as the passion one feels when society recognizes his connection to a ‘cause’, composed by a ‘subject’ and a ‘quality’. Conversely, no definition of vanity is (...)
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  16.  3
    Hume and the Art of Theological Lying.Péter Hartl - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):193-211.
    This paper critically examines David Berman's theological lying interpretation of Hume and identifies two types of theological lying: the denial of atheism strategy and the pious Christian strategy. It is argued that neither reading successfully establishes an atheist interpretation of Hume. Moreover, circumstantial evidence shows that Hume's position was different from that of the atheists of his time. Attributions theological lying to Hume, therefore, are unwarranted and should be rejected, even if we grant that this literary technique was used in (...)
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  17.  2
    Hume's Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals and The Whole Duty of Man.Esther Engels Kroeker - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):117-132.
    I examine, in this paper, the contents of one of the most famous religious texts of the early modern period, The Whole Duty of Man, and I show that Hume's Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Man is an attempt to reappropriate and replace the Anglican devotional with his own moral philosophy. Hume would reject the devotional's general methodology, its claims about the foundation of morality, and its list of duties. However, a careful reading of The Whole Duty of Man reveals (...)
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  18.  1
    Christopher Berry, Essays on Hume, Smith, and the Scottish Enlightenment.Maria Pia Paganelli - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):221-222.
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  19.  4
    Elizabeth Radcliffe, Hume, Passion and Action.Juan S. Santos - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (2):222-225.
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  20.  5
    Thomas Reid: Philosophy, Science, and the Christian Revelation.Roberto Di Ceglie - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):17-38.
    Two significant aspects of Thomas Reid's thought seem to be irreconcilable with one another. On the one hand, Reid constantly refers to the substantive benefits which human knowledge receives from the Christian revelation. On the other hand, he does not justify philosophical or scientific beliefs by way of appeal to God. In this essay, I argue that a closer inspection of both Reid's philosophical reflection and scientific investigations shows that the two aspects just mentioned are compatible with one another. In (...)
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  21.  86
    A Humean Approach to the Boundaries of the Moral Domain.Mark Collier - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):1-16.
    Hume maintains that the boundaries of morality are widely drawn in everyday life. We routinely blame characters for traits that we find disgusting, on this account, as well as those which we perceive as being harmful. Contemporary moral psychology provides further evidence that human beings have a natural tendency to moralize traits that produce feelings of repugnance. But recent work also demonstrates a significant amount of individual variation in our sensitivities to disgust. We have sufficient reason to bracket this emotion, (...)
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  22.  8
    Hume's Missing Shade of Blue: A New Solution.Brian D. Earp - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):91-104.
    What to do with the missing shade of blue? Some have argued that Hume's famous thought experiment undermines his central doctrine – the ‘copy principle’ – such that he should have revised his whole theory in light of it. Others contend that the MSB is not a true or actual counterexample to the copy principle, but merely an apparent or conceivable one, so that he had no such obligation to revise. In this essay, I argue that even if the MSB (...)
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  23.  2
    Assembling the Enlightened Scots: Fifty Years of Research.Roger L. Emerson - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):105-111.
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  24.  4
    ‘I Am Greatly Obliged to the Dutch’: James Beattie's Dutch Connection.Joost Hengstmengel - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):67-90.
    In the second half of the 18th century, Scottish Enlightenment philosophy spread to the Dutch Republic, where it found a favourable reception. The most popular Scottish philosopher among Dutch intellectuals arguably was James Beattie of Aberdeen. Almost all of his prose works were translated into Dutch, and the Zeeland Society of Sciences elected him a foreign honorary member. It made Beattie remark that he was ‘greatly obliged to the Dutch’, and a Dutch learned journal that he had ‘in a sense (...)
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  25.  8
    Hume and the Guise of the Bad.Francesco Orsi - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):39-56.
    In Treatise 2.3.4.5 Hume provides an explanation of why ‘we naturally desire what is forbid, and take a pleasure in performing actions, merely because they are unlawful’. Hume's explanation of this phenomenon has barely received any attention so far. But a detailed analysis bears fruit for both Humean scholarship and contemporary moral psychology. After putting the passage in its context, I explain why desiring and taking pleasure in performing certain actions merely because they are unlawful poses a challenge to Hume's (...)
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  26.  4
    American Indian Inferiority in Hume's Second Enquiry.Rodney Roberts - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):57-66.
    It is fairly well known that Hume added a footnote to his essay ‘Of National Characters’ in which he asserts that all non-white peoples are naturally inferior to white people. Subsequently, he revised the note to assert only that black people are naturally inferior to white people. But while the view expressed in this footnote has been described as ‘shockingly bigoted’, and even as his ‘racial law,’ it is still commonly thought that in Hume's voluminous writings it is apparently just (...)
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  27.  1
    Charles Bradford Bow (Ed.), Common Sense in the Scottish Enlightenment.Max Skjönsberg - 2020 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 18 (1):113-116.
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