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  1.  3
    Hutcheson's Contentious Sense of Honour.Bihotz Barrenechea - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):145-163.
    The moral sense is at the heart of Hutcheson's system. Its prominent role in this philosopher's morals and posterior commentary eclipses the rest of the senses, but there is at least one sense that deserves more attention in scholarship: the sense of honour. The reason the sense of honour, and its subordination to the moral sense, is attention-worthy is that it combats Mandeville's idea of honour as artifice. First, I flesh out the tension between pride and the moral sense and (...)
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  2.  6
    Samuel Fleischacker, Being Me Being You: Adam Smith and Empathy.Colin Heydt - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):165-168.
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  3.  1
    Population as a GDP Proxy in Adam Smith.Maria Pia Paganelli - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):115-123.
    How do we measure economic growth? In the eighteenth century, well before the birth of Gross Domestic Product commonly used today, looking at the sign of the balance of trade was a way to take the pulse of a nation's economy. Adam Smith rejects this measure and instead suggests that we should look at population growth. Nations that are able to produce enough to support the life of a growing population have growing economies, nations with constant population have stagnant economies, (...)
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  4.  5
    Ryan Patrick Hanley, Our Great Purpose: Adam Smith on Living a Better Life.Farhad Rassekh - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):168-172.
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  5.  3
    George Turnbull, Adam Ferguson, and the Social Value of Knowledge.Alfredo Romagosa - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):125-143.
    The importance of Adam Ferguson as part of the Scottish Enlightenment has been well established, with concentration on his social and political thought. George Turnbull has not been as well studied, but the valuable recent anthology by M. A. Stewart and Paul Wood has incited new interest. This paper selects a narrow aspect of their thought, their views on the social role of knowledge, which show common as well as complementary aspects. As educators who published their enhanced class notes, their (...)
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  6.  4
    Alexander Broadie (Ed.), Scottish Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century.Bonnie Soper - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):172-177.
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  7.  3
    Paul Sagar, The Opinion of Mankind: Sociability and the Theory of the State From Hobbes to Smith.Tim Stuart-Buttle - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):177-183.
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  8.  9
    Hume's Pious Theist: Pamphilus.James Tarrant - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (2):95-113.
    Pamphilus's neglected role of narrator in Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, with its twin themes of piety and world origination, is vital in appreciating the significance of the work. Pamphilus illustrates the stultifying effects of the early inculcation of piety on the creative arguments of natural religion and mirrors the contemporary institutional opposition to Hume. The DNR is not simply a brilliant dissection of divine authorship of morality and creation; it is a model of impiety. Philo's brilliant attack on the (...)
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  9.  62
    Perception as a Multi-Stage Process: A Reidian Account.Marina Folescu - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):57-74.
    The starting point of this paper is Thomas Reid's anti-skepticism: our knowledge of the external world is justified. The justificatory process, in his view, starts with and relies upon one of the main faculties of the human mind: perception. Reid's theory of perception has been thoroughly studied, but there are some missing links in the explanatory chain offered by the secondary literature. In particular, I will argue that we do not have a complete picture of the mechanism of perception of (...)
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  10.  11
    Impartiality Through ‘Moral Optics’: Why Adam Smith Revised David Hume's Moral Sentimentalism.Christel Fricke & Maria Alejandra Carrasco - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):1-18.
    We read Adam Smith's Theory of Moral Sentiments as a critical response to David Hume's moral theory. While both share a commitment to moral sentimentalism, they propose different ways of meeting its main challenge, that is, explaining how judgments informed by sentiments can nevertheless have a justified claim to general authority. This difference is particularly manifest in their respective accounts of ‘moral optics’, or the way they rely on the analogy between perceptual and moral judgments. According to Hume, making perceptual (...)
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  11.  3
    Otto Pipatti, Morality Made Visible: Edward Westermarck's Moral and Social Theory.Aaron Garrett - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):91-94.
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  12.  2
    Religion, Evolution and Scottish Philosophy.Gordon Graham - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):75-89.
    This paper explores developments in the defence of theism within Scottish philosophy following Hume's Dialogues and the advent of Darwinian evolutionary biology. By examining the writings of two nineteenth-century Scottish philosophers, it aims to show that far from Darwinian biology completing Hume's destruction of natural theology, it prompted a new direction for the defence of philosophical theism. Henry Calderwood and Andrew Seth Pringle-Pattison occupied, respectively, the Chairs of Moral Philosophy and Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh in the (...)
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  13.  1
    Thomas Carlyle, Scotland's Migrant Philosophers, and Canadian Idealism, C. 1870–1914.Alexander Jordan - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):39-56.
    That the great Scottish man of letters Thomas Carlyle exercised a formative influence over late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century ‘British Idealism’ has long been recognized by historians. Through works such as Sartor Resartus, Heroes and Hero-Worship, Past and Present, and Latter-Day Pamphlets, Carlyle transmitted his ideas regarding the immanence of the divine in nature and man, the infinite character of duty, and the ethical role of the state to a generation of subsequent philosophers. The following article will extend this insight, arguing that (...)
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  14.  10
    Hume's General Point of View, Smith's Impartial Spectator, and the Moral Value of Interacting with Outsiders.John McHugh - 2021 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 19 (1):19-37.
    Here is an appealing position: one reason to pursue interaction with people from backgrounds that differ from our own is that doing so can improve our moral judgment. As some scholars have noticed, this position seems pedigreed by support from the famed philosophers of human sociability, David Hume and Adam Smith. But regardless of whether Hume or Smith personally held anything like the appealing position, neither might have had theoretically grounded reason to do so. In fact, both philosophers explain moral (...)
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