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  1.  29
    Order in Multiplicity: Homonymy in the Philosophy of Aristotle.Christopher John Shields - 1998 - Oxford University Press.
    Aristotle attaches particular significance to the homomyny of many of the central concepts in philosophy and science: that is, to the diversity of ways of being that are denoted by a single concept. Shields here investigates and evaluates Aristotle's approach to questions about homonymy, characterizing the metaphysical and semantic commitments necessary to establish the homonymy of a given concept. Then, in a series of case studies, he examines in detail some of Aristotle's principal applications of homonymy--to the body, sameness and (...)
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  2.  43
    Leibniz's Doctrine of the Striving Possibles.Christopher John Shields - 1986 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 24 (3):343-357.
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    The Truth Evaluability of Stoic Phantasiai : Adversus Mathematicos VII 242-46.Christopher John Shields - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3):325-347.
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    The Truth Evaluability of Stoic.Christopher John Shields - 1993 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 31 (3).
  5. Aristotle's Philosophy of Mind.Christopher John Shields - 1986 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    Aristotle argues that the soul and body are non-identical substances; the soul is an immaterial particular form, while the body is a diachronic material continuant. Despite their immateriality, Aristotle argues that souls are not separable from bodies, and so implicitly rejects any version of Cartesian dualism. But because of his commitment to immaterialism, Aristotle's position cannot be assimilated to any contemporary materialist theory in the philosophy of mind. We need not, however, regard him as inconsistent in rejecting both Cartesian dualism (...)
     
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