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  1. Interpretations of the Concepts of Resilience and Evolution in the Philosophy of Leibniz.Vincenzo De Florio - manuscript
    In this article I interpret resilience and evolution in view of the philosophy of Leibniz. First, I discuss resilience as a substance’s or a monad’s “quantity of essence” — its “degree of perfection” — which I express as the quality of the Whole with respect to the sum of the qualities of the Parts. Then I discuss evolution, which I interpret here as the autopoietic Principle that sets Itself in motion and creates all reality, including Itself. This Principle may be (...)
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  2. Concepts of "Time" and "Place" in Leibniz's Philosophy.Muhammed Safian & Abdullah Amini - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 56.
    Leibniz initially believed in the absoluteness of time and place, but later he changed his idea. His true and final view is that time and place are relative and subjective concepts, whereas Newton believed that they are absolute and have a real and objective existence independent of other phenomena. In his correspondence with Samuel Clark, he refers to the weak points of the views of Newton and Clark and presents several philosophical and theological arguments to reject them. Time and place (...)
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  3. God, Beauty, and Evil in Leibniz's Best of All Possible Worlds.Eric Wampler - unknown - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 18.
  4. The Metaphysics of Leibniz’s New System.Julia Borcherding - forthcoming - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide. Oxford, UK:
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  5. The Space Between and the Space Within: On the Definition, Conception, and Function of Space in Leibniz's Late Metaphysics.Julia Bursten - forthcoming - Think.
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  6. Power, Harmony, and Freedom: Debating Causation in 18th Century Germany.Corey Dyck - forthcoming - In Frederick Beiser & Brandon Look (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Eighteenth Century German Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    As far as treatments of causation are concerned, the pre-Kantian 18th century German context has long been dismissed as a period of uniform and unrepentant Leibnizian dogmatism. While there is no question that discussions of issues relating to causation in this period inevitably took Leibniz as their point of departure, it is certainly not the case that the resulting positions were in most cases dogmatically, or in some cases even recognizably, Leibnizian. Instead, German theorists explored a range of positions regarding (...)
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  7. 18th Century German Philosophy Prior to Kant.Corey W. Dyck & Brigitte Sassen - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  8. The Discreteness of Matter: Leibniz on Plurality and Part-Whole Priority.Adam Harmer - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    Leibniz argues against Descartes’s conception of material substance based on considerations of unity. I examine a key premise of Leibniz’s argument, what I call the Plurality Thesis—the claim that matter (i.e. extension alone) is a plurality of parts. More specifically, I engage an objection to the Plurality Thesis stemming from what I call Material Monism—the claim that the physical world is a single material substance. I argue that Leibniz can productively engage this objection based on his view that matter is (...)
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  9. On Some Leibnizian Arguments for the Principle of Sufficient Reason.Stephen Harrop - forthcoming - History of Philosophy Quarterly.
    Leibniz often refers to the Principle of Sufficient Reason (PSR) as something like a first principle. In some texts, however, he attempts to give positive arguments in its favor. I examine two such arguments, and find them wanting. The first argument has two defects. First, it is question-begging; and second, when the question-begging step is excised, the principle one can in fact derive is highly counter-intuitive. The second argument is valid, but has the defect of only reaching a nearly trivial (...)
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  10. Force, Motion, and Leibniz’s Argument From Successiveness.Peter Myrdal - forthcoming - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    This essay proposes a new interpretation of a central, and yet overlooked, argument Leibniz offers against Descartes’s power-free ontology of the corporeal world. Appealing to considerations about the successiveness of motion, Leibniz attempts to show that the reality of motion requires force. It is often assumed that the argument is driven by concerns inspired by Zeno. Against such a reading, this essay contends that Leibniz’s argument is instead best understood against the background of an Aristotelian view of the priority of (...)
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  11. Essence and Existence in Leibniz's Ontology.Lorenzo Pena - forthcoming - Synthesis Philosophica.
    The concept of every real thing from all eternity contains the unavoidability of its existence before the divine decision. Thus every complete concept of a real thing contains the property of being such that the thing will exist if a created universe exists. Then a thing's existence cannot be external to its concept. There is bound to be more in the concept of something that exists than in that of "something" that does not-since existence is explained through the quidditative property (...)
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  12. Leibnizian Pluralism and Bradleian Monism: A Question of Relations.Pauline Phemister - forthcoming - Studia Leibnitiana.
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  13. The Principles of Contradiction, Sufficient Reason, and Identity of Indiscernibles.Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra - forthcoming - In Maria Rosa Antognazza (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Leibniz. Oxford University Press.
    Leibniz was a philosopher of principles: the principles of Contradiction, of Sufficient Reason, of Identity of Indiscernibles, of Plenitude, of the Best, and of Continuity are among the most famous Leibnizian principles. In this article I shall focus on the first three principles; I shall discuss various formulations of the principles (sect. 1), what it means for these theses to have the status of principles or axioms in Leibniz’s philosophy (sect. 2), the fundamental character of the Principles of Contradiction and (...)
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  14. Kant and Russell on Leibniz' Existential Assertions.Alessandro Rossi - forthcoming - Sophia:1-21.
    Leibniz believed in a God that has the power to create beings and whose existence could be a priori demonstrated. Kant (KrV, A 592-602/B 620-630) rejected such demonstrations as they all presuppose the false claim that existence is a real property. Moreover, (Russell 1992) added that if existence were a real property Leibniz should have concluded that God does not actually have the power to create anything at all. First, I show that Leibniz’ conception of existence is incompatible with the (...)
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  15. Requisite Theory in Leibniz= Teoría de Los Requisitos En Leibniz.Julian Velarde Lombrana - forthcoming - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy.
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  16. Het spatium: Leibniz en Deleuze over ruimte en uitgebreidheid.Florian Vermeiren - forthcoming - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie.
    This paper aims to show that Deleuze’s ideas on space and extension are heavily in debt to Leibniz. The focus is on chapter five, ‘the Asymmetrical Synthesis of the Sensible’, of Difference and Repetition. Concepts such as ‘intensive magnitude’, ‘distance’, ‘order’ and most importantly ‘spatium’ are shown to have their origin in Leibniz’s philosophy. In order to do so, the article starts with Leibniz’s critique on Cartesian mechanics and how this leads Leibniz to a conception of space that goes beyond (...)
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  17. Leibniz's Exoteric Philosophy.John Whipple - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  18. From Theism to Idealism to Monism: A Leibnizian Road Not Taken.Samuel Newlands - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (4):1143-1162.
    This paper explores a PSR-connected trail leading from theistic idealism to a form of substance monism. In particular, I argue that the same style of argument available for a Leibnizian form of metaphysical idealism actually leads beyond idealism to something closer to Spinozistic monism. This path begins with a set of theological commitments about the nature and perfection of God that were widely shared among leading early modern philosophers. From these commitments, there arises an interesting case for metaphysical idealism, roughly (...)
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  19. Somethings and Nothings: Śrīgupta and Leibniz on Being and Unity.Allison Aitken & Jeffrey K. McDonough - 2020 - Philosophy East and West (4).
    Śrīgupta, a Buddhist philosopher in the Middle Way tradition, was born in Bengal in present-day India in the seventh century. He is best known for his Introduction to Reality with its accompanying auto-commentary,1 in which he presents the first Middle Way iteration of the influential "neither-one-nor-many argument."2 This antifoundationalist line of reasoning sets out to prove that nothing enjoys ontologically independent being.Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz was born some one thousand years later, in the city of Leipzig, situated on the outskirts of (...)
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  20. Principle of Sufficient Reason.Fatema Amijee - 2020 - In Michael J. Raven (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding. New York: Routledge. pp. 63-75.
    According to the Principle of Sufficient Reason (henceforth ‘PSR’), everything has an explanation or sufficient reason. This paper addresses three questions. First, how continuous is the contemporary notion of grounding with the notion of sufficient reason endorsed by Spinoza, Leibniz, and other rationalists? In particular, does a PSR formulated in terms of ground retain the intuitive pull and power of the PSR endorsed by the rationalists? Second, to what extent can the PSR avoid the formidable traditional objections levelled against it (...)
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  21. Leibniz’s Early Theodicy and its Unwelcome Implications.Thomas Feeney - 2020 - The Leibniz Review 30:1-28.
    To explain why God is not the author of sin, despite grounding all features of the world, the early Leibniz marginalized the divine will and defined existence as harmony. These moves support each other. It is easier to nearly eliminate the divine will from creation if existence itself is something wholly intelligible, and easier to identify existence with an internal feature of the possibles if the divine will is not responsible for creation. Both moves, however, commit Leibniz to a necessitarianism (...)
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  22. Leibniz’s Lost Argument Against Causal Interaction.Tobias Flattery - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (12).
    Leibniz accepts causal independence, the claim that no created substance can causally interact with any other. And Leibniz needs causal independence to be true, since his well-known pre-established harmony is premised upon it. So, what is Leibniz’s argument for causal independence? Sometimes he claims that causal interaction between substances is superfluous. Sometimes he claims that it would require the transfer of accidents, and that this is impossible. But when Leibniz finds himself under sustained pressure to defend causal independence, those are (...)
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  23. The Role of Plurality in Leibniz’s Argument From Unity.Adam Harmer - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (3):437-457.
    I argue that Leibniz’s well-known Argument from Unity is equally an argument from plurality. I detail two main claims about plurality that drive the argument, and I provide evidence that they structure Leibniz’s argument from the late 1670s onwards. First, there is what I call Mereological Nihilism (i.e., the claim that a plurality cannot be made into a true unity by any available means). Second, there is what I call the Plurality Thesis (i.e., the claim that matter is a plurality (...)
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  24. The Correspondence with Arnauld.Julia Jorati - 2020 - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz’s Key Philosophical Writings. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 80-100.
    Leibniz’s correspondence with Antoine Arnauld is one of the clearest and most comprehensive expressions of Leibniz’s philosophy in the so-called middle period. This chapter will explore the philosophical content of this correspondence. It will concentrate on four of the most central topics: (a) complete concepts and contingency, (b) substance and body, (c) causation, and (d) the special status of rational souls in God’s plan.
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  25. Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by Richard Arthur. [REVIEW]Julia Jorati - 2020 - Mind 129 (514):664-673.
    Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads through Leibniz’s Labyrinth, by ArthurRichard. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. Pp. ix + 329.
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  26. Embodied Cognition Without Causal Interaction in Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2020 - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition in Early Modern Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 252–273.
    My aim in this chapter is to explain how and why all human cognition depends on the body for Leibniz. I will show that there are three types of dependence: (a) the body is needed in order to supply materials, or content, for thinking; (b) the body is needed in order to give us the opportunity for the discovery of innate ideas; and (c) the body is needed in order to provide sensory notions as vehicles of thought. The third type (...)
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  27. Newton and Leibniz.Julia Jorati - 2020 - Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    It is easy to get the impression that Newton and Leibniz do not see eye to eye on anything. Yet, as is so often the case, a closer look reveals that matters are much more complicated. Despite their disagreements, the two are frequently on the same side of central scientific and philosophical debates. This entry discusses some of the main agreements and disagreements between Newton and Leibniz, starting with their methodologies and then turning to their views on space, motion, and (...)
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  28. Dissertation on Combinatorial Art.G. W. Leibniz - 2020 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  29. Leibniz's Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide.Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.) - 2020 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    This volume presents introductory chapters from internationally-renowned experts on eleven of Leibniz's key philosophical writings. Offering accessible accounts of the ideas and arguments of his work, along with information on their composition and context, this book is an invaluable companion to the study of Leibniz.
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  30. Continuity, Containment, and Coincidence: Leibniz in the History of the Exact Sciences: Vincenzo De Risi (Ed.): Leibniz and the Structure of Sciences: Modern Perspectives on the History of Logic, Mathematics, and Epistemology. Dordrecht: Springer, 2019, 298pp, 103.99€ HB.Christopher P. Noble - 2020 - Metascience 29 (3):523-526.
  31. The Logic of Leibniz’s Borrowed Reality Argument.Stephen Puryear - 2020 - Philosophical Quarterly 70 (279):350-370.
    Leibniz argues that there must be a fundamental level of simple substances because composites borrow their reality from their constituents and not all reality can be borrowed. I contend that the underlying logic of this ‘borrowed reality argument’ has been misunderstood, particularly the rationale for the key premise that not all reality can be borrowed. Contrary to what has been suggested, the rationale turns neither on the alleged viciousness of an unending regress of reality borrowers nor on the Principle of (...)
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  32. The "Monadology".Lloyd Strickland - 2020 - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz's Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide. Oxford, UK: pp. 206-227.
    Written in 1714, the “Monadology” is widely regarded as a classic statement of much of Leibniz’s mature philosophical system. In just 90 numbered paragraphs, Leibniz outlines—and argues for—the core features of his system, starting with his famous doctrine of monads (simple substances) and ending with the uplifting claim that God is concerned not only for the world as a whole but for the welfare of the virtuous in particular. This chapter begins by considering the circumstances of composition of the “Monadology” (...)
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  33. Discourse on Metaphysics.Lloyd Strickland - 2020 - In Paul Lodge & Lloyd Strickland (eds.), Leibniz's Key Philosophical Writings: A Guide. Oxford, UK: pp. 56-79.
    The “Discourse on Metaphysics” is widely considered to be Leibniz’s most important philosophical work from his so-called “middle period”. Written early in 1686, when Leibniz was 39 years old, it consolidates a number of philosophical ideas that he had developed and sketched out in the years beforehand in a host of short private essays, fragments, and letters. This chapter guides the reader through the key themes of the “Discourse”, such as God’s choice of the best, the nature of substance, final (...)
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  34. Nikolai Lossky’s Evolutionary Metaphysics of Reincarnation.Frédéric Tremblay - 2020 - Sophia 59 (4):733-753.
    The Russian philosopher Nikolai Onufrievich Lossky adhered to an evolutionary metaphysics of reincarnation according to which the world is constituted of immortal souls or monads, which he calls ‘substantival agents.’ These substantival agents can evolve or devolve depending on the goodness or badness of their behavior. Such evolution requires the possibility for monads to reincarnate into the bodies of creatures of a higher or of a lower level on the scala perfectionis. According to this theory, a substantival agent can evolve (...)
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  35. Samuel Clarke.Timothy Yenter - 2020 - In Dana Jalobeanu & Charles T. Wolfe (eds.), Encyclopedia of Early Modern Philosophy and the Sciences.
    Samuel Clarke (1675–1729) profoundly shaped early eighteenth-century European philosophy with an a priori demonstration of the existence of God and influential defenses of substance dualism and human freedom. Throughout his works, he defended absolute space, the passivity of matter, and constant divine activity in the world, which jointly provided a metaphysical basis for the quickly popularizing Newtonian thought.
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  36. Cause and Effect in Leibniz’s Brevis Demonstratio.Laurynas Adomaitis - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (1):120-134.
    Leibniz’s argument against Descartes’s conservation principle in the Brevis demonstratio (1686) has traditionally been read as passing from the premise that motive force must be conserved to the conclusion that motive force is not identical to quantity of motion and, finally, that quantity of motion is not conserved. In a lesser-known draft of the same year, Christiaan Huygens claimed that Descartes had in fact never held the view that Leibniz was attacking. Huygens is right as far as the traditional reading (...)
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  37. Organisme et corps organique de Leibniz à Kant, by F. Duchesneau.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:107-119.
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  38. Leibniz and the Structure of Sciences: Modern Perspectives on the History of Logic, Mathematics, Epistemology.Vincenzo De Risi (ed.) - 2019 - Springer.
  39. A Reply to M. F. Camposampiero.François Duchesneau - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:121-128.
  40. Machines of Nature and Machines of Art: Christian Wolff's Reception of Leibniz.Matteo Favaretti Camposampiero - 2019 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 3:431-452.
  41. Leibniz on Human Finitude, Progress, and Eternal Recurrence: The Argument of the ‘Apokatastasis’ Essay Drafts and Related Texts.David Forman - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:225-270.
    The ancient doctrine of the eternal return of the same embodies a thoroughgoing rejection of the hope that the future world will be better than the present. For this reason, it might seem surprising that Leibniz constructs an argument for a version of the doctrine. He concludes in one text that in the far distant future he himself ‘would be living in a city called Hannover located on the Leine river, occupied with the history of Brunswick, and writing letters to (...)
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  42. Leibniz on the Problem of Evil, by P. Rateau.Kristen Irwin - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:161-165.
  43. Leibniz's Ontology of Force.Julia Jorati - 2019 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 8:189–224.
    Leibniz portrays the most fundamental entities in his mature ontology in at least three different ways. In some places, he describes them as mind-like, immaterial substances that perceive and strive. Elsewhere, he presents them as hylomorphic compounds. In yet other passages, he characterizes them in terms of primitive and derivative forces. Interpreters often assume that the first description is the most accurate. In contrast, I will argue that the third characterization is more accurate than the other two. If that is (...)
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  44. Leibniz on Spontaneity, The Eduction of Substantial Forms, and Creaturely Interaction: A Tension.Davis Kuykendall - 2019 - Studia Neoaristotelica 16 (2):229-274.
    Leibniz argued that (i) substantial forms only begin to exist via Divine creation; (ii) created substances cannot transeuntly cause accidents in distinct substances; and yet (iii) created substances immanently produce their accidents. Some of Leibniz’s support for (i) came from his endorsement of a widely-made argument against the eduction of substantial forms. However, in defense of eduction, Suárez argued that if creatures cannot produce substantial forms, they also cannot produce accidents, threatening the consistency of (i) and (iii). In this paper, (...)
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  45. (English Translation of) “Contexte Génétique Et Première Réception de la Monadologie. Leibniz, Wolff Et la Doctrine de L’Harmonie Préétablie,”.Antonio Lamarra, Catherine Fullarton & Ursula Goldenbaum - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:185-199.
    The many equivocations that, in several respects, characterised the reception of Leibniz's Principes de la Nature et de la Grâce and Monadologie, up until the last century, find their origins in the genetic circumstances of their manuscripts, which gave rise to misinformation published in an anonymous review that appeared in the Leipzig Acta eruditorum in 1721. Archival research demonstrates that the author of this review, as well as of the Latin review of the Monadologie, which appeared, the same year, in (...)
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  46. Response to C. Noble.Ohad Nachtomy - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:157-159.
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  47. Living Mirrors: Infinity, Unity, and Life in Leibniz's Philosophy, by O. Nachtomy.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:141-155.
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  48. Leibniz on the Divine Preformation of Souls and Bodies.Christopher P. Noble - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):327-342.
  49. Monads, Composition, and Force. Ariadnean Threads Through Leibniz's Labyrinth by Richard T. W. Arthur. [REVIEW]Stephen Puryear - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (4):761-762.
    Leibniz describes the problem of the composition of the continuum as one of the two famous labyrinths of the human mind. The problem is in brief that matter and motion appear to be continuous and thus would seem to be composed of an infinity of spatial or temporal points, which is absurd. Leibniz's strategy for escaping from this labyrinth involves distinguishing the realm of the real or actual from that of the ideal. In the former there is composition from parts (...)
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  50. Comments on “Leibniz on Internal Action and Why Mills Can't Think”.Paul Rateau - 2019 - The Leibniz Review 29:41-48.
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