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Donald Ross [5]Donald L. Ross [3]
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Donald Ross
Marymount University
  1.  76
    Time, the Heaven of Heavens, and Memory in Augustine’s Confessions.Donald L. Ross - 1991 - Augustinian Studies 22:191-205.
    Five interpretations of Augustine's theory of time in Confessions XI are discussed. A distinction is made between the dimensionality, the sequentiality, and the unidirectionality of time; and various arguments are given for the thesis that Augustine regarded time as subjective in only the second and third senses. Then it is shown that for Augustine the heaven of heavens and the memory come as close as creatures can to a Godlike view of time--as extended but non-sequential .
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  2.  20
    Gregory of Nyssa.Donald L. Ross - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This is a general account of the Cappadocian Christian Father Gregory of Nyssa (c. 335 - c. 395 CE) as a philosopher. The article is divided into a discussion of his life and his views on God, the world, humanity, history, knowledge, and virtue. A common thread, which would later be systematized in the Palamite essence-energies distinction, is traced in all these topics. Of particular interest to philosophers are comparisons with John Locke and Immanuel Kant.
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  3.  31
    Features of Written Argument.Donald Ross & Deborah Rossen-Knill - 2016 - Argumentation 30 (2):181-205.
    To complement theoretically driven work on argument, we present a datadriven description of published, written argument. We analyze political or philosophical treatises, articles in scholarly journals, and U.S. Supreme Court decisions. The description has emerged out of an inductive and a posteriori process based in grounded theory. The result is a suite of thirty-eight features that begins with conditions antecedent to writing and continues through to the consequences for the reader. We relate observational data to theories and practices from the (...)
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  4.  31
    Thomizing Plotinus: A Critique of Professor Gerson.Donald Ross - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (2):197-204.
    This is a critique of L. P. Gerson's Plotinus. It criticizes Gerson's accounts of the existence of the One, the attributes of the One, Nous and forms, and Soul and souls. In general, it is contended that Gerson's approach, which views Plotinus through a Thomistic lens, is ahistorical.
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  5.  12
    The Deuteros Plous, Simmias' Speech, and Socrates' Answer to Cebes in Plato's 'Phaedo'.Donald Ross - 1982 - Hermes 110 (1):19-25.
    There is growing recognition in Phaedo scholarship of a parallel between the deuteros plous passage and the introduction to Simmias' speech: both speak of attempting to discover or to learn the truth about things, and then, if that proves impossible, to resort to divine or human logoi, the former being the "safer" of the two. It is contended that that model governs Socrates reply to Cebes: he first tried to discover the truth about causes by himself; then he tried to (...)
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  6.  11
    Time, the Heaven of Heavens, and Memory in Augustine’s Confessions.Donald L. Ross - 1991 - Augustinian Studies 22:191-205.
    Five interpretations of Augustine's theory of time in Confessions XI are discussed. A distinction is made between the dimensionality, the sequentiality, and the unidirectionality of time; and various arguments are given for the thesis that Augustine regarded time as subjective in only the second and third senses. Then it is shown that for Augustine the heaven of heavens and the memory come as close as creatures can to a Godlike view of time--as extended but non-sequential .
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  7.  5
    Ἐναντίου Αὐτῷ... Τινος at "Phaedo" 104 D 3.Donald Ross - 1981 - Hermes 109 (2):252-253.
    A defense is provided of the following translation of Phaedo 104d1-3: "Would they not, Cebes, be those things which, whatever they possess, force it to have not only their own form, but also in every case that of one of its opposites?".
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  8.  4
    The Text of Augustine's Confessions X 40.65.Donald Ross - 1997 - Hermes 125 (2):252-253.
    A defense is provided for repunctuating a sentence toward the end of Confessions X 40.65 to yield the following translation: "Neither did I myself discover them--that is, that ability of mine by which I did it--nor did that ability itself. Thou wast the one . . . .".
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