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  1.  4
    Herder on Nationality, Humanity, and History.Frederick M. Barnard - 2003 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    F.M. Barnard demonstrates that Herder, despite his innovative work on the idea of nationality, was fully aware not only of the dangers of ethnic fanaticism but also of the hazards of what is now know as globalization, recognizing that these must be tempered by a sense of universal humanity. Barnard shows that Herder anticipated modern theories of the dynamics of cultures and traditions through the problematic interplay of persistence and change and that his speculations on cultural and political pluralism, on (...)
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  2.  8
    Self-Direction and Political Legitimacy: Rousseau and Herder.Frederick M. Barnard - 1988 - Oxford University.
    Johann Gottfried Herder (1744-1803) has been called the German Rousseau. Yet while Rousseau is recognized as a political thinker, Herder is not. This book explores each thinker's ideas--on nature and culture, selfhood and mutuality, paternalism, freedom, and autonomy--and compares their conceptions of legitimate statehood. Arguing that the crux of political legitimacy for both men was the possibility of "extended selfhood," Barnard shows that Herder, like Rousseau, profoundly altered human self-understandings, thus influencing modes of justifying political allegiance.
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  3.  2
    Democratic Legitimacy: Plural Values and Political Power.Frederick M. Barnard - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Barnard argues that Western democracy, if it is to continue to exist as a legitimate political system, must maintain the integrity of its application of performative principles. Consequently, if both social and political democracy are legitimate goals, limitations designed to curb excessive political power may also be applicable in containing excessive economic power. Barnard stresses that whatever steps are taken to augment civic reciprocity, the observance and self-imposition of publicly recognized standards is vital. Democratic Legitimacy will appeal to political scientists (...)
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  4.  1
    “Aufklärung” and “Mündigkeit”: Thomasius, Kant, and Herder.Frederick M. Barnard - 1983 - Deutsche Vierteljahrsschrift für Literaturwissenschaft Und Geistesgeschichte 57 (2):278-297.
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    Jürgen Misch, "Die Politische Philosophie Ludwig Woltmanns: Im Spannungsfeld von Kantianismus, Historischem Materialismus Und Sozialdarwinismus". [REVIEW]Frederick M. Barnard - 1978 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 16 (2):240.
  6. Spinozism.Frederick M. Barnard - 1967 - In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York: Macmillan. pp. 5--541.
     
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  7.  1
    Democratic Legitimacy: Plural Values and Political Power.Frederick M. Barnard - 2001 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    Barnard argues that Western democracy, if it is to continue to exist as a legitimate political system, must maintain the integrity of its application of performative principles. Consequently, if both social and political democracy are legitimate goals, limitations designed to curb excessive political power may also be applicable in containing excessive economic power. Barnard stresses that whatever steps are taken to augment civic reciprocity, the observance and self-imposition of publicly recognized standards is vital. Democratic Legitimacy will appeal to political scientists (...)
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