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  1.  40
    Neurotrauma and the Rule of Rescue.S. Honeybul, G. R. Gillett, K. M. Ho & C. R. P. Lind - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):707-710.
    The rule of rescue describes the powerful human proclivity to rescue identified endangered lives, regardless of cost or risk. Deciding whether or not to perform a decompressive craniectomy as a life-saving or ‘rescue’ procedure for a young person with a severe traumatic brain injury provides a good example of the ethical tensions that occur in these situations. Unfortunately, there comes a point when the primary brain injury is so severe that if the patient survives they are likely to remain severely (...)
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  2.  16
    Paper: Neurotrauma and the RUB: Where Tragedy Meets Ethics and Science.G. R. Gillett, S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & C. R. P. Lind - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):727-730.
    Decompressive craniectomy is a technically straightforward procedure whereby a large section of the cranium is temporarily removed in cases where the intracranial pressure is dangerously high. While its use has been described for a number of conditions, it is increasingly used in the context of severe head injury. As the use of the procedure increases, a significant number of patients may survive a severe head injury who otherwise would have died. Unfortunately some of these patients will be left severely disabled; (...)
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  3.  13
    Unnecessary Holes in the Head.G. R. Gillett - 2001 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 23 (6):1.
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  4.  26
    Informed Consent and Moral Integrity.G. R. Gillett - 1989 - Journal of Medical Ethics 15 (3):117-123.
    Informed consent is required for any medical procedure although the situations in which it is given are beset by uncertainties and indeterminacies. These make medicolegal scrutiny of such situations very difficult. Although some people find the decision in the Sidaway case incomprehensible because of its continuing regard for a 'professional practice standard' in informed consent, I will argue that an important fact in many cases is the moral integrity of the doctor concerned and the pattern of his practice. This may (...)
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  5.  9
    The Neurophilosophy of Pain: G. R. Gillett.G. R. Gillett - 1991 - Philosophy 66 (256):191-206.
    The ability to feel pain is a property of human beings that seems to be based entirely in our biological natures and to place us squarely within the animal kingdom. Yet the experience of pain is often used as an example of a mental attribute with qualitative properties that defeat attempts to identify mental events with physiological mechanisms. I will argue that neurophysiology and psychology help to explain the interwoven biological and subjective features of pain and recommend a view of (...)
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  6.  9
    Disembodied Persons: G. R. Gillett.G. R. Gillett - 1986 - Philosophy 61 (237):377-386.
    In discussing Disembodied Persons we need to confront two problems: A. Under what conditions would we consider that a person was present in the absence of the normal bodily cues? B. Could such circumstances arise? The first question may be regarded as epistemic and the second as metaphysical.
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  7. Locked in Syndrome, PVS and Ethics at the End of Life.G. R. Gillett & Nick Chisholm - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):1-4.
    I had my accident on the rugby field on July 29, 2000 about 2.00 p.m. during a simple line - out, even before the ball was thrown in. I t just felt like another simple case of concussion , I staggered to the sideline, the coach asked me “what ’s wrong”? He said I told him I just felt sick and to put me back on the field in 10 minutes. Then I collapsed, eventually blacked out and then was rushed (...)
     
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  8.  2
    Why Let People Die?G. R. Gillett - 1986 - Journal of Medical Ethics 12 (2):83-86.
    This paper concerns those patients whose brain is irreversibly damaged to the point where they will never recover significant mental life. I examine the reasons which justify the decision to withhold or discontinue active medical intervention in these patients. They involve the identity, quality of life and agency of those beings whom we value as persons.
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  9.  3
    Tacit Semantics.G. R. Gillett - 1988 - Philosophical Investigations 11 (1):1-12.
  10.  17
    Traumatic Brain Injury: An Objective Model of Consent. [REVIEW]S. Honeybul, K. M. Ho & G. R. Gillett - 2014 - Neuroethics 7 (1):11-18.
    The aim of this paper was to explore the issue of consent when considering the use of a life saving but not necessarily restorative surgical intervention for severe traumatic brain injury. A previous study has investigated the issue amongst 500 healthcare workers by using a two-part structured interview to assess opinion regarding decompressive craniectomy for three patients with varying injury severity. A visual analogue scale was used to assess the strengths of their opinions both before and after being shown objective (...)
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