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  1. Rare but Routine: The Physician's Obligation to Protect Third Parties.Elmer D. Abbo & Angelo E. Volandes - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (2):34 – 36.
  2. What Determines Whether Patients Are Willing to Participate in Resuscitation Studies Requiring Exception From Informed Consent?P.-A. Abboud - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):468-472.
    Objectives: To examine the willingness of patients to participate in a resuscitation study that requires exception from informed consent and to determine if willingness to participate is associated with demographic and other characteristics.Methods: Adult patients in an emergency department and in a geriatric outpatient clinic were surveyed. Patients were asked to imagine that they presented to an emergency department with cardiac arrest and asked about their willingness to receive a new drug outside of a study, receive a new drug as (...)
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  3. Difficult Healthcare Transitions.R. Abdool, M. Szego, D. Buchman, L. Justason, S. Bean, A. Heesters, H. Kaufman, B. Parke, F. Wagner & J. Gibson - 2016 - Nursing Ethics 23 (7):770-783.
  4. Collection, Storage and Use of Blood Samples for Future Research: Views of Egyptian Patients Expressed in a Cross-Sectional Survey.A. Abou-Zeid, H. Silverman, M. Shehata, M. Shams, M. Elshabrawy, T. Hifnawy, S. A. Rahman, B. Galal, H. Sleem, N. Mikhail & N. Moharram - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (9):539-547.
    Objective To determine the attitudes of Egyptian patients regarding their participation in research and with the collection, storage and future use of blood samples for research purposes. Design Cross-sectional survey. Study population Adult Egyptian patients (n=600) at rural and urban hospitals and clinics. Results Less than half of the study population (44.3%) felt that informed consent forms should provide research participants the option to have their blood samples stored for future research. Of these participants, 39.9% thought that consent forms should (...)
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  5. Children's Capacity to Agree to Psychological Research: Knowledge of Risks and Benefits and Voluntariness.Rona Abramovitch, Jonathan L. Freedman, Kate Henry & Michelle Van Brunschot - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):25 – 48.
    A series of studies investigated the capacity of children between the ages of 7 and 12 to give free and informed consent to participation in psychological research. Children were reasonably accurate in describing the purpose of studies, but many did not understand the possible benefits or especially the possible risks of participating. In several studies children's consent was not affected by the knowledge that their parents had given their permission or by the parents saying that they would not be upset (...)
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  6. Moral Duties of Parents and Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Procedures Involving Children.Terrence Ackerman - 1980 - Journal of Medical Humanities 2 (2):94-111.
    Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive (...)
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  7. Medical Ethics and the Two Dogmas of Liberalism.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1984 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).
    Two dogmas of liberalism in the therapeutic setting are challenged: (1) that patients have a ready-made ability to act autonomously; and (2) that non-intervention by physicians is the best strategy for protecting the autonomy of patients. Recognition of the impact of illness upon autonomous behavior forms the basis of this challenge. It is suggested that autonomy is better conceived as a process of personal growth by which patients become better able to overcome the disruptive effects of illness. The physician is (...)
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  8. Why Doctors Should Intervene.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (4):14-17.
  9. The Limits of Beneficence: Jehovah's Witnesses & Childhood Cancer.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1980 - Hastings Center Report 10 (4):13-18.
  10. Moral Duties of Parents and Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Procedures Involving Children.Terrence F. Ackerman - 1980 - Bioethics Quarterly 2 (2):94-111.
    Shared views regarding the moral respect which is owed to children in family life are used as a guide in determining the moral permissibility of nontherapeutic clinical research procedures involving children. The comparison suggests that it is not appropriate to seek assent from the preadolescent child. The analogy with interventions used in family life is similarly employed to specify the permissible limit of risk to which children may be exposed in nontherapeutic research procedures. The analysis indicates that recent writers misconceive (...)
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  11. Capacity, Consent, and Selection Bias in a Study of Delirium.D. Adamis - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (3):137-143.
    Objectives: To investigate whether different methods of obtaining informed consent affected recruitment to a study of delirium in older, medically ill hospital inpatients.Design: Open randomised study.Setting: Acute medical service for older people in an inner city teaching hospital.Participants: Patients 70 years or older admitted to the unit within three days of hospital admission randomised into two groups.Intervention: Attempted recruitment of subjects to a study of the natural history of delirium. This was done by either a formal test of capacity, followed (...)
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  12. Promoting Social Responsibility Amongst Health Care Users: Medical Tourists' Perspectives on an Information Sheet Regarding Ethical Concerns in Medical Tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:19.
    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from (...)
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  13. Ethical Considerations in Informed Consent for Potential Future Use of Human Tissue Samples.Mary Adams, Ernest D. Prentice & G. S. Oki - 1995 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 18 (2):6-7.
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  14. Should Blood-Borne Virus Testing Be Part of Operative Consent? When the Doctor Becomes the Patient.S. T. Adams & S. H. Leveson - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):476-478.
    Point-of-care testing (POCT) is a sensitive, specific and rapid form of testing for the presence of HIV antibodies. Post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection can reduce seroconversion rates by up to 80%. Needlestick injuries are the second commonest cause of occupational injury in the NHS and 20% of these occur during operations. In the NHS, in order to protect staff and patients from the risk of bloodborne viruses such as HIV, it is mandatory to report such injuries; however, numerous studies have (...)
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  15. A Mixed-Methods Study on Perceptions Towards Use of Rapid Ethical Assessment to Improve Health Research Informed Consent Processes in a Low-Income Setting.Adamu Addissie, Gail Davey, Yeweyenhareg Feleke, Thomas Addissie, Hayley Macgregor, Melanie Newport & Bobbie Farsides - unknown
    Background Rapid Ethical Assessment is a form of rapid ethnographic assessment conducted at the beginning of research project to guide the consent process with the objective of reconciling universal ethical guidance with specific research contexts. The current study is conducted to assess the perceived relevance of introducing REA as a mainstream tool in Ethiopia. Methods Mixed methods research using a sequential explanatory approach was conducted from July to September 2012, including 241 cross-sectional, self-administered and 19 qualitative, in-depth interviews among health (...)
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  16. Acceptance and Perception of Nigerian Patients to Medical Photography.W. L. Adeyemo, B. O. Mofikoya, O. A. Akadiri, O. James & A. A. Fashina - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):105-110.
    The aim of the study was to determine the acceptance and perception of Nigerian patients to medical photography. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among Nigerian patients attending oral and maxillofacial surgery and plastic surgery clinics of 3 tertiary health institutions. Information requested included patients' opinion about consent process, capturing equipment, distribution and accessibility of medical photographs. The use of non-identifiable medical photographs was more acceptable than identifiable to respondents for all purposes (P = 0.003). Most respondents were favourably disposed to (...)
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  17. HIV, Confidentiality and 'a Delicate Balance': A Reply to Leone Ridsdale.M. W. Adler - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (4):196-198.
    The passing on of information to GPs by genito-urinary doctors is to be encouraged but is not always possible and ultimately the patient's wishes and confidentiality must be respected if sexually transmitted diseases and HIV infection are to be controlled. Infected health-care workers should seek counselling and medical support and clear guidelines from professional organisations which are in existence. However, they will only do so if strict confidentiality is maintained and assurance about future employment can be given.
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  18. Informed Consent and Collaborative Research: Perspectives From the Developing World.Salman A. Wali Adnan A. Hyder - 2006 - Developing World Bioethics 6 (1):33-40.
    ABSTRACTIntroduction: Informed consent has been recognized as an important component of research protocols and procedures of disclosure and consent in collaborative research have been criticized, as they may not be in keeping with cultural norms of developing countries. This study, which is part of a larger project funded by the United States National Bioethics Advisory Commission, explores the opinions of developing country researchers regarding informed consent in collaborative research.Methods: A survey of developing country researchers, involved in human subject research, was (...)
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  19. Hyder & Salmon A. Informed Consent and Collaborative Research Perspectives From the Developing World.A. Adnan - 2006 - Bioethics 6:33-40.
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  20. Informed Consent in Psychiatry: European Perspectives of Ethics, Law and Clinical Practice.G. Adshead - 1999 - Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (5):428-429.
  21. Views of Patients with Heart Failure About Their Role in the Decision to Start Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Treatment: Prescription Rather Than Participation.A. Agard, R. Lofmark, N. Edvardsson & I. Ekman - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):514-518.
    Background: There is a shortage of reports on what potential recipients of implantable cardioverter–defibrillators need to be informed about and what role they can and want to play in the decision-making process when it comes to whether or not to implant an ICD.Aims: To explore how patients with heart failure and previous episodes of malignant arrhythmia experience and view their role in the decision to initiate ICD treatment.Patients and methods: A qualitative content analysis of semistructured interviews was used. The study (...)
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  22. Liberal Forensic Medicine.Joseph Agassi - 1978 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (3):226-241.
    The liberal approach to ethics quite naturally tends toward the classic individualistic theory of society, to reductionism or psychologism so-called, that is, to a reduction of all social action to individual action. For example, liberalism allows one to experiment with new medications on one's own body. By extension, liberalism allows one to experiment, it seems, on another person's body with new medication if one acts as the other person's agent, that is, if one has the other person's proper consent. We (...)
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  23. When Consent is Unbearable: An Alternative Case Analysis.G. J. Agich - 1979 - Journal of Medical Ethics 5 (1):26-28.
    Dr Agich takes up a previous difficult case related by Dr Kottow in an earlier issue of the Journal. He analyses the three ethical problems as presented in the case and offers his own opinion of it as well as his own conclusions with regard to the medical ethical aspects of it. Unlike Dr Kottow, Dr Agich's reading of the case indicates that the application of the principle of informed consent does not rule out ethical decisions for the physician, but (...)
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  24. Reassessing Autonomy in Long‐Term Care.George J. Agich - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (6):12-17.
  25. Facing the Ethical Questions in Facial Transplantation.George J. Agich & Maria Siemionow - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):25 – 27.
  26. Choice is Not the Issue. The Misrepresentation of Healthcare in Bioethical Discourse.Kari Milch Agledahl, Reidun Førde & Åge Wifstad - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):212-215.
    Next SectionThe principle of respect for autonomy has shaped much of the bioethics' discourse over the last 50 years, and is now most commonly used in the meaning of respecting autonomous choice. This is probably related to the influential concept of informed consent, which originated in research ethics and was soon also applied to the field of clinical medicine. But while available choices in medical research are well defined, this is rarely the case in healthcare. Consideration of ordinary medical practice (...)
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  27. Improving Informed Consent: The Medium is Not the Message.Patricia Agre, Frances A. Campbell, Barbara D. Goldman, Maria L. Boccia, Nancy Kass, Laurence B. McCullough, Jon F. Merz, Suzanne M. Miller, Jim Mintz & Bruce Rapkin - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  28. The Impossibility of Reliably Determining the Authenticity of Desires: Implications for Informed Consent.Jesper Ahlin - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):43-50.
    It is sometimes argued that autonomous decision-making requires that the decision-maker’s desires are authentic, i.e., “genuine,” “truly her own,” “not out of character,” or similar. In this article, it is argued that a method to reliably determine the authenticity (or inauthenticity) of a desire cannot be developed. A taxonomy of characteristics displayed by different theories of authenticity is introduced and applied to evaluate such theories categorically, in contrast to the prior approach of treating them individually. The conclusion is drawn that, (...)
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  29. Paying for Informed Consent.A. Akabayashi - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):212-213.
    The Japanese Ministry of Health and Welfare has implemented a policy of paying physicians to explain the nature of the patient's medical condition and the treatment plan. We describe the precepts of this policy and examine ethical dimensions of this development. We question whether this policy will be sufficient to ensure patients will have the opportunity to become informed participants in medical decision making. The policy also raises a broader philosophical question as to whether informed consent is a fundamental ethical (...)
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  30. The Adequacy of Informed Consent Forms in Genetic Research in Oman: A Pilot Study.Asya Al-Riyami, Deepali Jaju, Sanjay Jaju & Henry J. Silverman - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (2):57-62.
    Genetic research presents ethical challenges to the achievement of valid informed consent, especially in developing countries with areas of low literacy. During the last several years, a number of genetic research proposals involving Omani nationals were submitted to the Department of Research and Studies, Ministry of Health, Oman.The objective of this paper is to report on the results of an internal quality assurance initiative to determine the extent of the information being provided in genetic research informed consent forms. In order (...)
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  31. The Evolution of Consent Forms for Research: A Quarter Century of Changes.Ilene Albala, Margaret Doyle & Paul Appelbaum - 2010 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 32 (3):7-11.
    Institutional review boards and researchers have struggled to ensure that subjects receive sufficient information to make knowledgeable decisions about study participation. But the quality of the consent forms that are a key component of this process has rarely been evaluated. We reviewed 215 consent forms approved by an IRB serving a major academic department from 1978–2002 and discovered two trends: greater consistency in the description of risks, and an increase in the length of consent forms. However, despite data indicating that (...)
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  32. Consent and the Social Context.Priscilla Alderson - 1995 - Nursing Ethics 2 (4):347-350.
    A series of eight multidisciplinary conferences on consent to health care and research was held in London during the period 1992 to 1995. The aim was to present a rich and varied account of consent from the perspectives of academics (especially social scientists), practitioners, and people affected by personal experience. This report summarizes some of the main contributions.
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  33. Reconsidering the Value of Consent in Biobank Research.Judy Allen & Beverley Mcnamara - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (3):155-166.
    Biobanks for long-term research pose challenges to the legal and ethical validity of consent to participate. Different models of consent have been proposed to answer some of these challenges. This paper contributes to this discussion by considering the meaning and value of consent to participants in biobanks. Empirical data from a qualitative study is used to provide a participant view of the consent process and to demonstrate that, despite limited understanding of the research, consent provides the research participants with some (...)
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  34. Medical Ghostwriting and Informed Consent.Ben Almassi - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (9):491-499.
    Ghostwriting in its various forms has received critical scrutiny from medical ethicists, journal editors, and science studies scholars trying to explain where ghostwriting goes wrong and ascertain how to counter it. Recent analyses have characterized ghostwriting as plagiarism or fraud, and have urged that it be deterred through stricter compliance with journal submission requirements, conflict of interest disclosures, author-institutional censure, legal remedies, and journals' refusal to publish commercially sponsored articles. As a supplement to such efforts, this paper offers a critical (...)
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  35. Limiting Factors Impacting on Voluntary First Person Informed Consent in the Philippines.Alvarez Castillo Fatima - 2002 - Developing World Bioethics 2 (1):21-27.
    How well can institutional guidelines help ensure the dignity, rights, safety and well being of research participants in an underdeveloped country? In this paper I describe the limits of informed consent as an instrument for the protection of participants in the context of the Philippines. I bring to this paper my experiences as an advocate of rights, a member of an ethics review board, a researcher on the ethics of research and as an observer of the dynamics of clinical practice (...)
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  36. Selecting a Surrogate to Consent to Medical Research.Robert Amdur, Natalie Bachir & Elizabeth Stanton - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  37. Vulnerability: Sex Workers in Nairobi's Majengo Slum.Pamela Andanda - 2009 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (2):138.
    Researchers from the Universities of Oxford, Nairobi, and Manitoba are collaborating on a project to develop an HIV vaccine based on the immunological protection mechanisms found in commercial sex workers from the Majengo slum in Nairobi. This group consists of educationally and economically disadvantaged women who resort to commercial sex work for a living. A clinic was established in the slum to study sexually transmitted diseases, which now includes HIV/AIDS. The clinic serves as a research facility for the collaborating researchers (...)
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  38. Module Two: Informed Consent.Pamela Andanda - 2005 - Developing World Bioethics 5 (1):14–29.
    ABSTRACTThe objective of this module is to familiarise you with the concept of informed consent, its ethical basis, its elements, and typical problems that are encountered even by the most well intentioned researchers when trying to achieve genuine informed consent.
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  39. The Need for Additional Safeguards in the Informed Consent Process in Schizophrenia Research.K. K. Anderson & S. D. Mukherjee - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (11):647-650.
    The process of obtaining informed consent to participate in a clinical study presents many challenges for research conducted in a population of patients with schizophrenia. Morally valid, informed consent must include information sharing, decisional capacity, and capacity for voluntarism. This paper examines the unique features of schizophrenia that may threaten each of these elements of informed consent, and it proposes additional safeguards in the process of gaining informed consent from individuals with schizophrenia in order to maximise the decision-making potential of (...)
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  40. Critical Issues on Informed Consent in Africa.Cletus T. Andoh - 2008 - Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):109-123.
    Biomedical research has made tremendous advances during the last decade in improving human health and well being. In spite of these advances, research has encountered serious emerging challenges as it moves across boarders and confronts different societies with different cultural practices, beliefs, moral thoughts and different values. A pervasive and perplexing issue affecting the current advances in research is the perception that research might end up exploiting populations unless it is conducted in the context of a strong ethical framework. Furthermore, (...)
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  41. Harnessing the Benefits of Biobanks.Lori B. Andrews - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (1):22-30.
  42. The Role and Responsibilities of Witnesses in the Informed Consent Process.Angélica R. Ángeles-llerenas, Veronika Wirtz & César Francisco Lara-álvarez - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):18-25.
  43. The Role and Responsibilities of Witnesses in the Informed Consent Process.Veronika Wirtz Angélica R. Ángeles‐Llerenas - 2009 - Developing World Bioethics 9 (1):18-25.
    ABSTRACTVarious mechanisms to ensure the protection of subjects in human research have been suggested, including the presence of witnesses during the informed consent process. For our commentary on the use of witnesses and their potential role and responsibility during the consent process, we start by addressing current guidelines for human subjects research in four Latin American countries. By using examples from public health research, we highlight some of the practical difficulties of using witnessed consent, from becoming a meaningless ritual at (...)
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  44. Interviews and Informed Consent.Nancy R. Angoff - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (5):44-44.
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  45. The Goals of Informed Consent.George J. Annas - 1980 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 8 (3):13-13.
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  46. "Informed Consent": When "Good Medicine May Not Be Good Law".George J. Annas - 1973 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 1 (1):3-3.
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  47. Do as I Say, Not as I Do: Why Bioethicists Should Seek Informed Consent for Some Case Studies.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (3):28-34.
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  48. An Empirical Study on the Preferred Size of the Participant Information Sheet in Research.E. E. Antoniou, H. Draper, K. Reed, A. Burls, T. R. Southwood & M. P. Zeegers - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):557-562.
    Background Informed consent is a requirement for all research. It is not, however, clear how much information is sufficient to make an informed decision about participation in research. Information on an online questionnaire about childhood development was provided through an unfolding electronic participant sheet in three levels of information. Methods 552 participants, who completed the web-based survey, accessed and spent time reading the participant information sheet (PIS) between July 2008 and November 2009. The information behaviour of the participants was investigated. (...)
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  49. Privacy Versus History - How Far Should the Dead Hand Reach?Jacob Appel - 2012 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 21 (1):51-63.
    One of the most fundamental tenets of medical research, enshrined in the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki, is that scientific investigation involving human beings requires the informed consent of the subjects.
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  50. False Hopes and Best Data: Consent to Research and the Therapeutic Misconception.Paul S. Appelbaum, Loren H. Roth, Charles W. Lidz, Paul Benson & William Winslade - 1987 - Hastings Center Report 17 (2):20-24.
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