9 found
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  1.  9
    Free to Consume? Anti-Paternalism and the Politics of New York City’s Soda Cap Saga.Alison Bateman-House, Ronald Bayer, James Colgrove, Amy L. Fairchild & Caitlin E. McMahon - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (1).
    In 2012, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg proposed capping the size of sugary beverages that could be sold in the city’s restaurants, sporting and entertainment facilities and food carts. After a lawsuit and multiple appeals, the proposal died in June 2014, deemed an unconstitutional overreach. In dissecting the saga of the proposed soda cap, we highlight both the political perils of certain anti-obesity efforts and, more broadly, the challenges to public health when issues of consumer choice and the threat (...)
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  2.  3
    Health and Human Rights: Old Wine in New Bottles?Gerald M. Oppenheimer, Ronald Bayer & James Colgrove - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):522-532.
    It is one of the remarkable and significant consequence of the AIDS epidemic that out of the context of enormous suffering and death there emerged a forceful set of ideas linking the domains of health and human rights. At first, the effort centered on the observation that protecting individuals from discrimination and unwarranted intrusions on liberty were, contrary to previous epidemics, crucial to protecting the public health and interrupting the spread of HIV But in fairly short order, the scope of (...)
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  3.  1
    Health and Human Rights: Old Wine in New Bottles?Gerald M. Oppenheimer, Ronald Bayer & James Colgrove - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):522-532.
    It is one of the remarkable and significant consequence of the AIDS epidemic that out of the context of enormous suffering and death there emerged a forceful set of ideas linking the domains of health and human rights. At first, the effort centered on the observation that protecting individuals from discrimination and unwarranted intrusions on liberty were, contrary to previous epidemics, crucial to protecting the public health and interrupting the spread of HIV But in fairly short order, the scope of (...)
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  4.  5
    “Science in a Democracy”: The Contested Status of Vaccination in the Progressive Era and the 1920s.James Colgrove - 2005 - Isis 96 (2):167-191.
    In the first decades of the twentieth century, a heterogeneous assortment of groups and individuals articulated scientific, political, and philosophical objections to vaccination. They engaged in an ongoing battle for public opinion with medical and scientific elites, who responded with their own counterpropaganda. These ideological struggles reflected fear that scientific advances were being put to coercive uses and that institutions of the state and civil society were increasingly expanding into previously private realms of decision making, especially child rearing. This essay (...)
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  5.  15
    Privacy, democracy and the politics of disease surveillance.Amy L. Fairchild, Ronald Bayer & James Colgrove - 2008 - Public Health Ethics 1 (1):30-38.
    Fairchild, Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health in the Department of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health Abstract Surveillance is a cornerstone of public health. It permits us to recognize disease outbreaks, to track the incidence and prevalence of threats to public health, and to monitor the effectiveness of our interventions. But surveillance also challenges our understandings of the significance and role of privacy in a liberal democracy. In this paper we trace the (...)
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  6.  3
    Rights and dangers: Bioterrorism and the ideologies of public health.Ronald Bayer & James Colgrove - 2003 - In Jonathan D. Moreno (ed.), In the wake of terror: medicine and morality in a time of crisis. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. pp. 51--74.
  7.  1
    Minor Consent for Vaccination: Ethically Justified, Politically Fraught.James Colgrove - 2024 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 52 (1):62-64.
    Policies allowing some minors to consent to receive recommended vaccines are ethically defensible. However, a policy change at the federal level expanding minor consent for vaccinations nationwide risks triggering a political backlash. Such a move may be perceived as infringing on the rights of parents to make decisions about their children’s health care. In the current post-COVID environment of heightened anti-vaccination activism, changes to minor consent laws may be unadvisable, and policy makers should proceed with caution.
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    The Myth of Exceptionalism: The History of Venereal Disease Reporting in the Twentieth Century.Amy L. Fairchild, James Colgrove & Ronald Bayer - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):624-637.
    As therapeutic advances in the treatment of AIDS began to emerge in the late 1980s and public health began to have more to offer than just the threat, or the perceived threat, of quarantine or partner notification, fissures began to appear in the alliance against named HIV reporting that had emerged a few years earlier. In 1989, New York City’s Health Commissioner stated that the prospects of early clinical intervention warranted “a shift toward a disease-control approach to HIV infection along (...)
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  9.  4
    The Myth of Exceptionalism: The History of Venereal Disease Reporting in the Twentieth Century.Amy L. Fairchild, James Colgrove & Ronald Bayer - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):624-637.
    As therapeutic advances in the treatment of AIDS began to emerge in the late 1980s and public health began to have more to offer than just the threat, or the perceived threat, of quarantine or partner notification, fissures began to appear in the alliance against named HIV reporting that had emerged a few years earlier. In 1989, New York City’s Health Commissioner stated that the prospects of early clinical intervention warranted “a shift toward a disease-control approach to HIV infection along (...)
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