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Jennifer Faust [9]Jennifer Lynn Faust [1]
  1.  10
    Can Religious Arguments Persuade?Jennifer Faust - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1-3):71-86.
    In his famous essay "The Ethics of Belief," William K. Clifford claimed "it is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence." ). One might claim that a corollary to Clifford's Law is that it is wrong, always, everywhere, and for anyone, to withhold belief when faced with sufficient evidence. Seeming to operate on this principle, many religious philosophers—from St. Anselm to Alvin Plantinga—have claimed that non-believers are psychologically or cognitively deficient if they refuse to believe (...)
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  2.  85
    Can Religious Arguments "Persuade"?Jennifer Faust - 2008 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 63 (1-3):71-86.
    In his famous essay "The Ethics of Belief," William K. Clifford claimed "it is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence." ). One might claim that a corollary to Clifford's Law is that it is wrong, always, everywhere, and for anyone, to withhold belief when faced with sufficient evidence. Seeming to operate on this principle, many religious philosophers—from St. Anselm to Alvin Plantinga—have claimed that non-believers are psychologically or cognitively deficient if they refuse to believe (...)
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  3.  33
    Unreasonable Accommodations?Jennifer Faust - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):357-381.
    Since formal logic courses are typically required in philosophy programs, students with certain cognitive disabilities are barred from pursuing philosophy degrees. Are philosophy programs (legally or morally) obligated to waive such requirements in the case of students with disabilities? A comparison is made between the formal logic requirement and the foreign language competency requirement, which leads to a discussion of what areas of study are essential to mastery of philosophy. Ultimately, it is concluded that at this point in the discipline’s (...)
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  4.  37
    Moving the Academy Closer to Utopia: What All Professors Can Do to Create LGBT-Friendly Campuses.Jennifer Faust - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):201-215.
    In spite of the fact that most university campuses are considered bastions of liberalism, it remains difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered faculty members and students to come out, and instances of poor treatment still occur. In addition, curricular issues related to LGBT identities and concerns continue to be met with resistance or outright hostility. In this paper, I argue that all faculty—not just LGBT faculty—have an obligation to play a more active role in creating an LGBT-friendly environment on (...)
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  5.  20
    Idealism Meets Realism: The Problem of Convergence in Blanshard's "The Nature of Thought".Jennifer Faust - 1998 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 34 (4):923 - 947.
  6.  15
    The Ethics of Scientific Research Utilizing Race as a Variable.Jennifer Faust - 2008 - Social Philosophy Today 24:107-120.
    Many philosophers have called for elimination of racial taxonomies in biomedical contexts, basing their arguments on one of two claims: that the use of racial terminology is unjust, and that the use of racial terminology in scientific contexts is inappropriate because race is scientifically meaningless. I argue that each of these claims is flawed, because justice sometimes demands the use of racial terminology, and because the utility of race in biomedical contexts makes it scientifically meaningful. I suggest a third argument (...)
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  7.  33
    Unreasonable Accommodations?: Waiving Formal Logic Requirements for Students with Disabilities.Jennifer Faust - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):357-381.
    Since formal logic courses are typically required in philosophy programs, students with certain cognitive disabilities are barred from pursuing philosophy degrees. Are philosophy programs obligated to waive such requirements in the case of students with disabilities? A comparison is made between the formal logic requirement and the foreign language competency requirement, which leads to a discussion of what areas of study are essential to mastery of philosophy. Ultimately, it is concluded that at this point in the discipline’s development, formal logic (...)
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  8.  19
    Moving the Academy Closer to Utopia: What All Professors Can Do to Create LGBT-Friendly Campuses.Jennifer Faust - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (2):201-215.
    In spite of the fact that most university campuses are considered bastions of liberalism, it remains difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered faculty members and students to come out, and instances of poor treatment still occur. In addition, curricular issues related to LGBT identities and concerns continue to be met with resistance or outright hostility. In this paper, I argue that all faculty—not just LGBT faculty—have an obligation to play a more active role in creating an LGBT-friendly environment on (...)
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