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  1. A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375-413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996–2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable – awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  2. A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996–2003. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375 - 413.
    This review summarizes and critiques the empirical ethical decision-making literature from 1996-2003. One hundred and seventy-four articles were published in top business journals during this period. Tables are included that summarize the findings by dependent variable - awareness, judgment, intent, and behavior. We compare this review with past reviews in order to draw conclusions regarding trends in the ethical decision-making literature and to surface directions for future research.
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  3. The Ethical Context in Organizations: Influences on Employee Attitudes and Behavior.Linda Klebe Treviño, Kenneth D. Butterfield & Donald L. McCabe - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):447-476.
    This field survey focused on two constructs that have been developed to represent the ethical context in organizations: ethical climate and ethical culture. We first examined issues of convergence and divergence between these constructs through factor analysis andcorrelational analysis. Results suggested that the two constructs are measuring somewhat different, but strongly related dimensions ofthe ethical context. We then investigated the relationships between the emergent ethical context factors and an ethics-related attitude and behavior for respondents who work in organizations with and (...)
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  4. Cheating in Academic Institutions: A Decade of Research.Kenneth D. Butterfield, Linda Klebe Trevino & Donald L. McCabe - 2001 - Ethics and Behavior 11 (3):219-232.
    This article reviews 1 decade of research on cheating in academic institutions. This research demonstrates that cheating is prevalent and that some forms of cheating have increased dramatically in the last 30 years. This research also suggests that although both individual and contextual factors influence cheating, contextual factors, such as students' perceptions of peers' behavior, are the most powerful influence. In addition, an institution's academic integrity programs and policies, such as honor codes, can have a significant influence on students' behavior. (...)
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  5.  58
    The Influence of Collegiate and Corporate Codes of Conduct on Ethics-Related Behavior in the Workplace.Kenneth D. Butterfield - 1996 - Business Ethics Quarterly 6 (4):461-476.
    Codes of conduct are viewed here as a community’s attempt to communicate its expectations and standards of ethical behavior. Many organizations are implementing codes, but empirical support for the relationship between such codes and employee conduct is lacking. We investigated the long term effects of a collegiate honor code experience as well as the effects of corporate ethics codes on unethical behavior in the workplace by surveying alumni from an honor code and a non-honor code college who now work in (...)
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  6. The Influence of Unethical Peer Behavior on Observers' Unethical Behavior: A Social Cognitive Perspective. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (2):117-131.
    The relationship between unethical peer behavior and observers’ unethical behavior traditionally has been examined from a social learning perspective. We employ two additional theoretical lenses, social identity theory and social comparison theory, each of which offers additional insight into this relationship. Data from 600 undergraduate business students in two universities provide support for all the three perspectives, suggesting that unethical behavior is influenced by social learning, social identity, and social comparison processes. Implications for managers and future research are discussed.
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  7.  23
    Moral Differentiation: Exploring Boundaries of the “Monkey See, Monkey Do” Perspective. [REVIEW]Michael J. O’Fallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):379-399.
    Research in ethical decision making has consistently demonstrated a positive relationship between others’ unethical behavior and observers’ unethical behavior, providing support for the “Monkey See, Monkey Do” perspective (e.g., Robinson and O’Leary-Kelly, Acad Manage J 41:658–672, 1998 ). However, the boundaries of this relationship have received little research attention. Guided by theory and research in interpersonal distancing, we explore these boundaries by proposing and examining “moral differentiation,” the set of individual and situational characteristics that affect the degree to which one (...)
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  8.  13
    Guest Editors’ Introduction Individual and Organizational Reintegration After Ethical or Legal Transgressions: Challenges and Opportunities.Jerry Goodstein, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Michael D. Pfarrer & Andrew C. Wicks - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):315-342.
    In this article we set the context for this special issue focusing on individual and organizational reintegration in the aftermath of transgressions that violate ethical and legal boundaries. Following a brief introduction to the topic we provide an overview of each of the four articles selected for this special issue. We then present a number of potentially fruitful empirical, theoretical, and normative directions management and ethics scholars might pursue in order to further advance this evolving literature.
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  9.  29
    An Inductive Model of Collaboration From the Stakeholder's Perspective.Kenneth D. Butterfield, Richard Reed & David J. Lemak - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (2):162-195.
  10.  3
    Managers’ Restorative Versus Punitive Responses to Employee Wrongdoing: A Qualitative Investigation.Nathan Robert Neale, Kenneth D. Butterfield, Jerry Goodstein & Thomas M. Tripp - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    A growing body of literature has examined managers’ use of restorative practices in the workplace. However, little is currently known about why managers use restorative practices as opposed to alternative responses. We employed a qualitative interview technique to develop an inductive model of managers’ restorative versus punitive response in the context of employee wrongdoing. The findings reveal a set of key motivating and moderating influences on the manager’s decision to respond to wrongdoing in a restorative versus punitive manner. The findings (...)
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  11.  7
    The Effects of the Mission Statement on Corporate Illegal Behavior.Bruce C. Skaggs & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 1995 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 6:913-924.
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  12.  5
    The Social Network Structure of Unethical Behavior.Daniel J. Brass, Kenneth D. Butterfield & Bruce C. Skaggs - 1995 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 6:13-24.
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  13. A Review of The Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 1996ÔÇô2003. [REVIEW]M. J. OÔÇÖFallon & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):375.
     
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  14.  2
    A Multi-Level Model of Relational Effects in Organizational Ethical Decision-Making.Kenneth D. Butterfield - 1994 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 5:85-95.
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  15.  35
    Extending the Horizon of Business Ethics: Restorative Justice and the Aftermath of Unethical Behavior.Jerry Goodstein & Kenneth D. Butterfield - 2010 - Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (3):453-480.
    We call for business ethics scholars to focus more attention on how individuals and organizations respond in the aftermath of unethical behavior. Insight into this issue is drawn from restorative justice, which moves beyond traditional approaches that emphasize retribution or rehabilitation to include restoring victims and other affected parties, reintegrating offenders, and facilitating moral repair in the workplace. We review relevant theoretical and empirical work in restorative justice and develop a conceptual model that highlights how this perspective can enhance theory (...)
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