10 found
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  1.  66
    Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse.Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):27 – 40.
  2.  77
    Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field.Leili Fatehi, Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey McCullough, Ralph Hall, Frances Lawrenz, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Cortney Jones, Stephen A. Campbell, Rebecca S. Dresser, Arthur G. Erdman, Christy L. Haynes, Robert A. Hoerr, Linda F. Hogle, Moira A. Keane, George Khushf, Nancy M. P. King, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gary Marchant, Andrew D. Maynard, Martin Philbert, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ronald A. Siegel & Samuel Wickline - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):716-750.
    Nanomedicine is yielding new and improved treatments and diagnostics for a range of diseases and disorders. Nanomedicine applications incorporate materials and components with nanoscale dimensions where novel physiochemical properties emerge as a result of size-dependent phenomena and high surface-to-mass ratio. Nanotherapeutics and in vivo nanodiagnostics are a subset of nanomedicine products that enter the human body. These include drugs, biological products, implantable medical devices, and combination products that are designed to function in the body in ways unachievable at larger scales. (...)
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  3.  1
    Standardization Across Non-Standard Domains: The Case of Organ Procurement.Linda F. Hogle - 1995 - Science, Technology and Human Values 20 (4):482-500.
    This article describes the work of negotiating and reinterpreting "standard" protocols and criteria at the level of local practice, using the example of the procurement of human cadaver organs for transplantation. The tension between efforts to starulardize and globalize biomedical science, on the one hand, and fitting these efforts into everyday practices and understandings of practitioners, on the other, results in new constructions of medical knowledge about bodies and persons.
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  4.  16
    Concepts of Risk in Nanomedicine Research.Linda F. Hogle - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):809-822.
    Risk takes center stage in ethical debates over nanomedical technologies. Yet concepts of risk may hold different meanings, and they are embedded within particular political, economic, and social contexts. This article discusses framings of risk in debates over medical innovations such as nanomedicine, and draws attention to organizational and institutional forms of risk which are less visible in bioethical policy debates. While significant, possibly unique risks may exist in specific nano-based products, risk may also arise from the very processes and (...)
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  5.  9
    Concepts of Risk in Nanomedicine Research.Linda F. Hogle - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):809-822.
    Risk is the most often cited reason for ethical concern about any medical science or technology, particularly those new technologies that are not yet well understood, or create unfamiliar conditions. In fact, while risk and risk-benefit analyses are but one aspect of ethical oversight, ethical review and risk assessment are sometimes taken to mean the same thing. This is not surprising, since both the Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration foreground procedures for minimizing risk for human subjects and require (...)
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  6.  9
    Science, Ethics, and the €œProblems” of Governing Nanotechnologies.Linda F. Hogle - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):749-758.
    Commentators continue to weigh in on whether there are ethical, social, and policy issues unique to nanotechnology, whether new regulatory schemes should be devised, and if so, how. Many of these commentaries fail to take into account the historical and political environment for nanotechnologies. That context affects regulatory and oversight systems as much as any new metrics to measure the effects of nanoscale materials, or organizational changes put in place to facilitate data analysis. What comes to count as a technical (...)
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  7.  24
    Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse".Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):W4 – W6.
  8.  4
    Science, Ethics, and the “Problems” of Governing Nanotechnologies.Linda F. Hogle - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (4):749-758.
    That cacophony you hear is coming from the growing number of commentators addressing ethical, social, and policy issues raised by nanotechnology. Like many novel technologies that disturb the status quo, nanotechnologies raise questions about the adequacy of oversight systems; the extent to which the technologies push legal, moral, and political boundaries; and ultimately, the implications for human health and well-being. Because nanoscale techniques and products challenge our ways of thinking about biology, physics, and chemistry, nanotechnology forces us to reconsider accepted (...)
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  9.  11
    Jordan Goodman;, Vivien Walsh. The Story of Taxol: Nature and Politics in the Pursuit of an Anti‐Cancer Drug. Xiii + 292 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001. $27.95. [REVIEW]Linda F. Hogle - 2002 - Isis 93 (4):762-763.
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  10.  8
    Bioethics Research and the Language of Methodological Uncertainty.Linda F. Hogle - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):13 – 14.
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