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  1.  31
    Stasis, or the Greek Invention of Politics.M. Berent - 1998 - History of Political Thought 19 (3):331-362.
    The Greek word stasis meant ‘faction’, ‘civil war’ but also ‘political standing’. This seems a strange contradiction, particularly since we credit the Greeks with having invented politics. This strange contradiction is partly explained by the nature of the Greek polis, which was not a State, but rather what anthropologists call a stateless community. The latter is a relatively unstratified egalitarian community characterized by the absence of public coercive apparatuses. However, though stateless, the Greek polis was also different from stateless communities (...)
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  2.  6
    In Search of the Greek State: A Rejoinder to M.H. Hansen.Moshe Berent - 2004 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 21 (1-2):107-146.
    In a collection of articles based on my Cambridge doctoral thesis I have argued that, contrary to what has been traditionally assumed, the Greek polis was not a State but rather what anthropologists call ‘a stateless society’. The latter is characterized by the absence of ‘government’, that is, an agency which has separated itself out from the rest of social life and which monopolizes the use of violence. In a recent article Mogens Herman Hansen discusses and rejects my notion of (...)
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  3.  11
    Hobbes and the ‘Greek Tongues’.M. Berent - 1996 - History of Political Thought 17 (1):36-59.
    In this paper I wish to illuminate the Hobbesian-Aristotelian controversy from a new angle. I suggest that contrary to what has been assumed from Hobbes's time down to this day, the Greek polis was not a State, or what Hobbes called a Common-wealth, but rather what anthropologists call a stateless community. The latter is characterized by the absence of coercive apparatuses, which means that the ability to apply force is more or less evenly distributed among the armed, or potentially armed, (...)
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  4.  2
    Sovereignty: Ancient and Modern.Moshe Berent - 2000 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 17 (1-2):2-34.
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  5.  29
    Anthropology and the Classics: War, Violence, and the Stateless Polis1.Moshe Berent - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (01):257-.
    I. INTRODUCTION It has become a commonplace in contemporary historiography to note the frequency of war in ancient Greece. Yvon Garlan says that, during the century and a half from the Persian wars to the battle of Chaeronea , Athens was at war, on average, more than two years out of every three, and never enjoyed a period of peace for as long as ten consecutive years. ‘Given these conditions’, says Garlan, ‘one would expect them to consider war as a (...)
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    Anthropology and the Classics: War, Violence, and the Stateless Polis.Moshe Berent - 2000 - Classical Quarterly 50 (1):257-289.
    I. INTRODUCTIONIt has become a commonplace in contemporary historiography to note the frequency of war in ancient Greece. Yvon Garlan says that, during the century and a half from the Persian wars to the battle of Chaeronea, Athens was at war, on average, more than two years out of every three, and never enjoyed a period of peace for as long as ten consecutive years. ‘Given these conditions’, says Garlan, ‘one would expect them to consider war as a problem …. (...)
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  7.  11
    "A Philosopher of the" God State," or a Communitarian?".Moshe Berent - 2004 - The European Legacy 9:533-536.
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