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  1.  55
    ‘Impiety’ and ‘Atheism’ in Euripides' Dramas.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1989 - Classical Quarterly 39 (01):70-.
    In the surviving plays of Aeschylus and Sophocles the gods appear to men only rarely. In the Eumenides Apollo and Athena intervene to bring acquittal to Orestes. In Sophocles' Philoctetes Heracles appears ex machina to ensure that the hero returns to Troy, and we learn from a messenger how the gods have summoned the aged Oedipus to a hero's tomb. In Sophocles' Ajax Athena drives Ajax mad and taunts him cruelly. Prometheus Bound might seem to be an exception, since all (...)
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  2.  12
    The Poet as Hero: Fifth-Century Autobiography and Subsequent Biographical Fiction.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1978 - Classical Quarterly 28 (02):459-.
    The old proverb can still more accurately be applied to their biographers.‘ Even the more plausible and psycho logically tempting details in the lives of literary figures derive from these authors’ fictional works, poems, and dramas, and not from the kind of source material biographers use today, letters, documents, eyewitness testimony. Critics and readers eager to establish some historical correlation between any ancient poet's life and his work should expect to be disappointed. But even if the ancient lives are useless (...)
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  3.  10
    Who Sang Pindar's Victory Odes?Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1988 - American Journal of Philology 109 (1).
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  4.  8
    Commentary on Vlastos.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1989 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 5 (1):239-246.
  5.  3
    Pindar's "Nemean" XI.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1979 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:49-56.
    Pindar, perhaps more than any other ancient poet, seems to demand from his interpreters declarations of their critical premises. In recent years scholars customarily have made initial acknowledgment to the work of E. R. Bundy, as psychoanalysts must to Freud, before they begin to offer their own modifications to and expansions of his fundamental work. Much contemporary scholarship has concentrated on the identification and classification in the odes of the elements whose function Bundy labelled and explained. But useful as this (...)
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  6.  32
    African Athena: New Agendas Ed. By Daniel Orrells, Gurminder K. Bhambra, Tessa Roynon (Review).Mary R. Lefkowitz - 2013 - American Journal of Philology 134 (2):347-350.
  7.  12
    A Herodotus for Our Time.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 2009 - History and Theory 48 (3):248-256.
  8.  9
    Commentary on Saxonhouse.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1998 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 14 (1):130-138.
  9. Euterpe, An Anthology of Early Greek Lyric, Elegiac, and Iambic Poetry.Mary R. Lefkowitz & Douglas E. Gerber - 1973 - American Journal of Philology 94 (2):192.
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  10. Greek Lyric Poetry. A Selection of Early Greek Lyric, Elegiac and Iambic Poetry.Mary R. Lefkowitz, David A. Campbell & D. L. Page - 1970 - American Journal of Philology 91 (4):466.
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  11.  6
    The Pindar Scholia.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 1985 - American Journal of Philology 106 (3):269.
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  12.  20
    Women's Letters From Ancient Egypt, 300 B.C.−A.D. 800.Mary R. Lefkowitz - 2007 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 101 (1):116-117.