10 found
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  1.  4
    The Neurobiology of Social Distance.Danilo Bzdok & Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2020 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 24 (9):717-733.
  2.  45
    Human Conversational Behavior.Robin I. M. Dunbar, Anna Marriott & Neil D. C. Duncan - 1997 - Human Nature 8 (3):231-246.
  3.  25
    The Microbiome in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience.Amar Sarkar, Siobhán Harty, Soili M. Lehto, Andrew H. Moeller, Timothy G. Dinan, Robin I. M. Dunbar, John F. Cryan & Philip W. J. Burnet - 2018 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 22 (7):611-636.
  4.  20
    Altruism in Social Networks: Evidence for a 'Kinship Premium'.Oliver Curry, Sam G. B. Roberts & Robin I. M. Dunbar - unknown
    Why and under what conditions are individuals altruistic to family and friends in their social networks? Evolutionary psychology suggests that such behaviour is primarily the product of adaptations for kin- and reciprocal altruism, dependent on the degree of genetic relatedness and exchange of benefits, respectively. For this reason, individuals are expected to be more altruistic to family members than to friends: whereas family members can be the recipients of kin and reciprocal altruism, friends can be the recipients of reciprocal altruism (...)
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  5.  24
    Do Birds of a Feather Flock Together?Oliver Curry & Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (3):336-347.
    Cooperation requires that individuals are able to identify, and preferentially associate with, others who have compatible preferences and the shared background knowledge needed to solve interpersonal coordination problems. The present study investigates the nature of such similarity within social networks, asking: What do friends have in common? And what is the relationship between similarity and altruism? The results show that similarity declines with frequency of contact; similarity in general is a significant predictor of altruism and emotional closeness; and, specifically, sharing (...)
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  6. The Small World of Shakespeare’s Plays.James Stiller, Daniel Nettle & Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2003 - Human Nature 14 (4):397-408.
    Drama, at least according to the Aristotelian view, is effective inasmuch as it successfully mirrors real aspects of human behavior. This leads to the hypothesis that successful dramas will portray fictional social networks that have the same properties as those typical of human beings across ages and cultures. We outline a methodology for investigating this hypothesis and use it to examine ten of Shakespeare’s plays. The cliques and groups portrayed in the plays correspond closely to those which have been observed (...)
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  7.  21
    Evolution and the Social Sciences.Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2007 - History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):29-50.
    When the social sciences parted company from evolutionary biology almost exactly a century ago, they did so at a time when evolutionary biology was still very much in its infancy and many key issues were unresolved. As a result, the social sciences took away with them an understanding of evolution that was in fact based on 18th- rather than 19th-century biology. I argue that contemporary evolutionary thinking has much more to offer the social sciences than most people have assumed. Contemporary (...)
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  8.  6
    Euphoria Versus Dysphoria: Differential Cognitive Roles in Religion?Yvan Russell, Robin I. M. Dunbar & Fernand Gobet - 2011 - In Slim Masmoudi, Abdelmajid Naceur & David Y. Dai (eds.), Attention, Representation & Performance. New York: Psychology Press. pp. 147-165.
    The original book chapter does not have an abstract. However, I have written an abstract for this repository: Religious life encompasses a wide diversity of situations for which the emotional tone is on a continuum from extreme euphoria to extreme dysphoria. In this book chapter, we propose the novel hypothesis that euphoria and dysphoria have distinctly separate functional consequences for religious evolution and survivability. This is due to the differential cognitive states that are created in euphoric and dysphoric situations. Based (...)
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  9.  19
    Menstrual Cycle Effects on Attitudes Toward Romantic Kissing.Rafael Wlodarski & Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (4):402-413.
    Hormonal changes associated with the human menstrual cycle have been previously found to affect female mate preference, whereby women in the late follicular phase of their cycle (i.e., at higher risk of conception) prefer males displaying putative signals of underlying genetic fitness. Past research also suggests that romantic kissing is utilized in human mating contexts to assess potential mating partners. The current study examined whether women in their late follicular cycle phase place greater value on kissing at times when it (...)
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  10.  5
    Text Analysis Shows Conceptual Overlap as Well as Domain-Specific Differences in Christian and Secular Worldviews.Joseph Watts, Sam Passmore, Joshua Conrad Jackson, Christoph Rzymski & Robin I. M. Dunbar - 2020 - Cognition 201:104290.
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