16 found
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  1.  17
    Hemispheric laterality in animals and the effects of early experience.Victor H. Denenberg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):1-21.
  2.  9
    Critical periods, stimulus input, and emotional reactivity: A theory of infantile stimulation.Victor H. Denenberg - 1964 - Psychological Review 71 (5):335-351.
  3.  7
    Population asymmetry and cross-species similarity.Victor H. Denenberg - 1981 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (1):38-49.
  4.  32
    Behavioral symmetry and reverse asymmetry in the chick and rat.Victor H. Denenberg - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):597-597.
    Chicks reared in the absence of light and rat pups reared without extra stimulation fail to exhibit behavioral laterality, implying that a threshold amount of environmental stimulation is necessary for the brain to follow an asymmetry pathway. Reverse asymmetry has been reported in the chick, but not the rat, though a sex difference resembling reverse asymmetry has been found in the rat.
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  5.  14
    Default is not in the female, but in the theory.Roslyn Holly Fitch & Victor H. Denenberg - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):341-346.
    A number of commentators agree that the evidence reviewed in the target article supports a previously unrecognized role for ovarian hormones in feminization of the brain. Others question this view, suggesting that the traditional model of sexual differentiation already accounts for ovarian influence. This position is supported by various reinterpretations of the data presented (e.g., ovarian effects are secondary to the presence/absence of androgen, ovarian effects are smaller than testicular effects, ovarian effects are not organizational). We discuss these issues, and (...)
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  6.  18
    Testosterone is non-zero, but what is its strength?Victor H. Denenberg - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):372-372.
    Mazur & Booth have shown an association between testosterone and dominance behavior, but the strength of the relationship is not given. In addition to being statistically significant, it is also necessary that testosterone account for a meaningful proportion of the variance; a multivariate model is probably necessary. A cautionary tale from the animal literature is related.
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  7.  12
    Mental duality and motor decisions.Victor H. Denenberg - 1987 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):153-153.
  8.  10
    Effects of language training: Some comparative considerations.Victor H. Denenberg - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):144-145.
  9.  11
    Sex, brain, and learning differences in rats.Victor H. Denenberg, Albert S. Berrebi & Roslyn H. Fitch - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (2):188-189.
  10.  9
    Supplementary report: The Yerkes-Dodson law and shift in task difficulty.Victor H. Denenberg & George G. Karas - 1960 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 59 (6):429.
  11.  6
    Handedness hangups and species snobbery.Victor H. Denenberg - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):721-722.
  12.  5
    Micro and macro theories of the brain.Victor H. Denenberg - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (1):174-178.
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  13.  5
    Stranger in a strange situation: Comments by a comparative psychologist.Victor H. Denenberg - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):150.
  14.  5
    Some principles for interpreting laterality differences.Victor H. Denenberg - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):232-233.
  15.  4
    Effects of correlation on interactions in the analysis of variance.Victor H. Denenberg - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):129-130.
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  16.  18
    A role for ovarian hormones in sexual differentiation of the brain.Roslyn Holly Fitch & Victor H. Denenberg - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (3):311-327.
    Historically, studies of the role of endogenous hormones in developmental differentiation of the sexes have suggested that mammalian sexual differentiation is mediated primarily by testicular androgens, and that exposure to androgens in early life leads to a male brain as defined by neuroanatomy and behavior. The female brain has been assumed to develop via a hormonal default mechanism, in the absence of androgen or other hormones. Ovarian hormones have significant effects on the development of a sexually dimorphic cortical structure, the (...)
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