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Forthcoming articles
  1. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). An Enchanting Abundance of Types: Nietzsche's Modest Unity of Virtue Thesis. Journal of Value Inquiry.
    Although Nietzsche accepted a distant cousin of Brian Leiter’s “Doctrine of Types,” according to which, “Each person has a fixed psycho-physical constitution, which defines him as a particular type of person,” the details of his actual view are quite different from the flat-footed position Leiter attributes to him. Leiter argues that Nietzsche thought that type-facts partially explain the beliefs and actions, including moral beliefs and actions, of the person whom those type-facts characterize. With this much, I agree. However, the Doctrine (...)
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  2. Bagnoli Carla (forthcoming). Moral Objectivity: A Kantian Illusion? Journal of Value Inquiry.
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  3. David DeGrazia (forthcoming). Jeremy R. Garrett (Ed), The Ethics of Animal Research. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  4. Leigh Duffy (forthcoming). Louise M. Antony (Ed.), Philosophers Without Gods: Meditations on Atheism and the Secular Life. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
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  5. Holly Lawford-Smith (forthcoming). Juha Räikkä, Social Justice in Practice. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    Imagine yourself standing on the edge of a canyon, marveling at the terrain below, wondering about all the sights currently obscured from your view, and lamenting that you just don’t have time to commit to the steep descent in and long trek across, which would give you a perspective from right up close. Being handed Juha Räikkä’s new book Social Justice in Practice is like being told there’s a flying fox you can take: the canyon is applied political theory, and (...)
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  6. Adam R. Thompson (forthcoming). Valerie Tiberius, Ed. Moral Psychology: An Introduction. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-5.
    Valerie Tiberius’s Moral Psychology: An Introduction is a gem. Clearly and crisply drawing on empirical and non-empirical work in philosophy and psychology, Tiberius illuminates the many ways in which the issues central to moral psychology arise in and bear on normative ethics, meta-ethics, and the study of agency and responsibility. Tiberius articulates deep debates, complex concepts and rationales, intricate empirical data points, and obscure assumptions with an enviable ease. Further, though the book is pitched in a manner that is accessible (...)
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  7. Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Michael W. Austin, Ed. Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    This ain’t your grandma’s virtue theory.In Michael Austin’s bold new collection, Virtues in Action: New Essays in Applied Virtue Ethics, gone are the pretentions of defining right action generically as what a virtuous person would do in the circumstances, while acting in and from character, provided that a virtuous person would end up in those circumstances. Instead, we find detailed explorations of specific virtues and vices related to specific fields of activity and problems, with attention (some of it careful – (...)
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  8. Mahesh Ananth (forthcoming). Gregory E. Kaebnick and Thomas H. Murray, Eds., Synthetic Biology and Morality: Artificial Life and the Bounds of Nature. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry:1-8.
    One way of acknowledging the putative progress of science is to trace its successes with respect to description, manipulation, and genuine innovation. In this regard, the history of genetics can be viewed as an exemplary case study. Indeed, the ground breaking work of Watson and Crick, the remarkable results associated with both describing and manipulating regulatory genes (e.g., early and recent work on Drosophila), and the cutting edge efforts related to nuclear transfer (i.e., cloning) are stunning progress-worthy accomplishments. Yet, there (...)
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  9. Stephen de Wijze (forthcoming). Searching for the Mark of Cain–Barry's Exploration of Evil Persons. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-9.
    When is it justified to refer to someone as evil? How, if at all, is this different from saying that this person is deeply immoral or simply very bad? Moreover, does identifying a person as evil have practical implications for the criminal law and the institution of punishment more generally? These are central questions that Barry seeks to answer in Evil and Moral Psychology. His wide-ranging analysis attempts to identify and reliably predict who is, and who will become, evil by (...)
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  10. Phillip Deen (forthcoming). What Moral Virtues Are Required to Recognize Irony? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-17.
    The Onion, a widely known satirical newspaper, frequently finds its articles taken as the literal truth. One article from May 2011, “Planned Parenthood Opens $8 Billion Abortionplex,” featured teenage girls gushing over the amusement park amenities like a ten-screen theater, nightclub and “lazy river” and a fake PR representative touting, “Whether she’s a high school junior who doesn’t want to go to prom pregnant, a go-getter professional who can’t be bothered with the time commitment of raising a child, or a (...)
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  11. Leigh Duffy (forthcoming). Katrina Hutchison and Fiona Jenkins , Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    In the introduction to Women in Philosophy: What Needs to Change?, editors, Fiona Jenkins and Katrina Hutchison, note that women in many fields of study feel frustrated, hurt, or merely annoyed at some of their experiences in academia. However, they also note something unusual about these feelings when it comes to philosophy: the feelings have given way “to careful reflection on how to make sense of such experience, how to find an articulation of its form, structure, causes, and potential remedies” (...)
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  12. Stephen Galoob (forthcoming). Stephen Winter, Transitional Justice in Established Democracies: A Political Theory. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    The fundamental question of political reparation is: why should a state provide redress for an injustice? The predominant answer justifies redress in terms of debts—the perpetration of an injustice creates a debt, and a state is required to make redress for the same reasons that it is required to repay its debts . Other approaches justify redress on the grounds that it will facilitate the achievement of some broader political goal, like the fair distribution of social resources or political reconciliation.In (...)
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  13. Paul Hughes (forthcoming). David Konstan, Before Forgiveness: The Origins of a Moral Idea. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-8.
    For the past thirty-five years or so forgiveness has been of great interest to philosophers, and the recent spate of new books and scholarly essays on the topic is evidence that this interest continues unabated. David Konstan’s Before Forgiveness: The Origins of a Moral Idea is among the recent contributions to this literature. Konstan argues that none of the various ways in which people in the classical Greek and Roman world managed angry emotional states such as resentment constitute the modern (...)
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  14. Whitley R. P. Kaufman (forthcoming). The Doctrine of Double Effect and the Trolley Problem. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-11.
    It is widely held by moral philosophers that J.J. Thomson’s “Loop Variant,” a version of the Trolley Problem first presented by her in 1985, decisively refutes the Doctrine of Double Effect as the right explanation of our moral intuitions in the various trolley-type cases.See Bruers and Brackman, “A Review and Systematization of the Trolley Problem,” Philosophia 42:2 : 251–269; T. Scanlon, Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame ; Peter Singer, “Ethics and Intuitions,” Journal of Ethics 9:314 : 331–352, p. 340; Matthew (...)
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  15. Chris Mayer (forthcoming). Anthony Cunningham, Modern Honor: A Philosophical Defense. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-5.
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  16. Juha Räikkä & Rosa Rantanen (forthcoming). James Stacey Taylor (Ed.): The Metaphysics and Ethics of Death. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-6.
    This is the first collection of essays of philosophical thanatology that explicitly connects the metaphysical and the ethical questions of death, including some bioethical questions. The volume has four sections, and the discussion moves from historical and theoretical problems to practical issues of bioethics. However, as the editor of the book, James Stacey Taylor, has surely intended, the practical questions discussed are closely related to traditional metaphysical problems, most notably to the questions such as whether death is a harm to (...)
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  17. Michael Ridge (forthcoming). Naïve Practical Reasoning and the Second-Person Standpoint: Simple Reasons for Simple People? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-14.
    Much contemporary first-order moral theory revolves around the debate between consequentialists and deontologists. Depressingly, this debate often seems to come down to irresolvable first-order intuition mongering about runaway trolleys, drowning children in shallow ponds, lying to murderers at doors, and the like. Prima facie, common sense morality contains both consequentialist and deontological elements, so it may be no surprise that direct appeal to first-order intuitions tend towards stalemate. One might infer from this that we should simply embrace some sort of (...)
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  18. David Rocheleau-Houle (forthcoming). Michael Ridge, Impassioned Belief. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-5.
    Michael Ridge’s Impassioned Belief is part of an important new wave in metaethics: hybrid theories. Ridge is a pioneer of hybrid expressivism; his own version is called “ecumenical expressivism.” His book is not only a collection of papers published in the last ten years. It covers more topics, and he also proposes some important improvements to his theory. Ridge’s work is an expansive one; in this review I shall limit myself to present what I consider to be the most important (...)
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  19. Uwe Steinhoff (forthcoming). Stephen Kershnar, Gratitude Toward Veterans: Why Americans Should Not Be Very Grateful to Veterans. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-3.
    Stephen Kershnar’s main argument in Gratitude toward Veterans is that Americans should not be very grateful towards veterans. More precisely, he not only argues that veterans do not deserve the gratitude that many Americans offer them, but also that it is morally objectionable to be grateful towards them. His argument is applicable to war veterans generally, not only to those in the USA. Yet, it does have specific relevance to the United States given that, as Kershnar demonstrates, public gratitude towards (...)
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  20. Sor-Hoon Tan (forthcoming). Xunzi and Naturalistic Ethics. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-19.
    The ascendency of science in modern times makes it commonplace to accept that science presents the only true and correct image of reality. This has led to naturalization attempts in various domains, from epistemology, metaphysics, to philosophy of mind, and ethics. Naturalistic ethics may mean different things depending on what we consider natural. David Copp equates it with the empirical – emphasizing the relevance of empirical evidence to justification – while admitting that what is empirical is itself problematic.David Copp, Morality (...)
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