Searle's wager

AI and Society 26 (4):363-369 (2011)
Abstract
Nicholas Agar has recently argued that it would be irrational for future human beings to choose to radically enhance themselves by uploading their minds onto computers. Utilizing Searle’s argument that machines cannot think, he claims that uploading might entail death. He grants that Searle’s argument is controversial, but he claims, so long as there is a non-zero probability that uploading entails death, uploading is irrational. I argue that Agar’s argument, like Pascal’s wager on which it is modelled, fails, because the principle that we (or future agents) ought to avoid actions that might entail death is not action guiding. Too many actions fall under its scope for the principle to be plausible. I also argue that the probability that uploading entails death is likely to be lower than Agar recognizes.
Keywords Agar  Searle  Consciousness  Radical enhancement  Uploading  Probability
Categories (categorize this paper)
Options
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
 
Download options
PhilPapers Archive


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 12,095
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA
David Cole, The Chinese Room Argument. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
John R. Searle (1980). Minds, Brains and Programs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):417-57.

View all 6 references

Citations of this work BETA
Similar books and articles
Larry Hauser, Searle's Chinese Room Argument. Field Guide to the Philosophy of Mind.
Graham Oppy (1991). On Rescher on Pascal's Wager. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 30 (3):159 - 168.
Christopher Toner (2006). Pascal's First Wager Reconsidered. International Philosophical Quarterly 46 (1):75-90.
Alan Hájek, Pascal's Wager. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Jerry A. Fodor & Ernest Lepore (1994). What is the Connection Principle? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (4):837-45.
Larry Hauser, Chinese Room Argument. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
Larry Hauser (2003). Nixin' Goes to China. In John M. Preston & John Mark Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. 123--143.
Analytics

Monthly downloads

Added to index

2011-10-28

Total downloads

26 ( #71,455 of 1,102,037 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

8 ( #34,166 of 1,102,037 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature


Discussion
Start a new thread
Order:
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.