Metaphor and Meaning in Early China

Western scholarship on early Chinese thought has tended to either dismiss the foundational role of metaphor or to see it as a uniquely Chinese mode of apprehending the world. This article argues that, while human cognition is in fact profoundly dependent on imagistic conceptual structures, such dependence is by no means a unique feature of Chinese thought. The article reviews empirical evidence supporting the claims that human thought is fundamentally imagistic; that sensorimotor schemas are often used to structure our understanding of abstract concepts; that these schemas can be selectively combined to result in novel structures; and that there are inextricable connections between body, emotion, and thought in both everyday and philosophical cognition. It also provides a review of a recent trend where, explicitly or not, scholars from a variety of backgrounds have begun to take metaphor more seriously as a foundational bearer of philosophical meaning in early China
Keywords No keywords specified (fix it)
Categories (categorize this paper)
DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9198-6
 Save to my reading list
Follow the author(s)
My bibliography
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Revision history Request removal from index
Download options
PhilPapers Archive

Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy on self-archival     Papers currently archived: 15,974
External links
Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
References found in this work BETA

View all 41 references / Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles
Xiong Liwen (2008). Dialogues Between Western and Eastern Culture From the Aspect of Logic. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:83-90.
Donald J. Munro (1969). The Concept of Man in Early China. Stanford, Calif.,Stanford University Press.

Monthly downloads

Added to index


Total downloads

27 ( #112,700 of 1,725,822 )

Recent downloads (6 months)

5 ( #134,315 of 1,725,822 )

How can I increase my downloads?

My notes
Sign in to use this feature

Start a new thread
There  are no threads in this forum
Nothing in this forum yet.