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  1. Jane Grimshaw, Linguistics Research Center.
    Optimality Theory is a theory of the economy of constraint violation. Can this property of the theory be exploited in our understanding of economy effects in general? Can economy of structure and movement be derived without reference to economy of structure and movement? The central idea of this paper is that the choice between filling positions by movement and filling positions with independent material is determined by markedness and faithfulness constraints. There is no ‘economy of movement’ constraint, just economy of (...)
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  2. Jane Grimshaw, Economy of Structure in Ot.
    Many recent studies have appealed to the idea that linguistic systems are subject to economy of structure or representation, e.g. Chomsky 1995, Rizzi 1997, Bresnan 2001. The guiding idea of economy of structure is that small structures are preferred over large ones, other things being equal. Other things being equal, projections with fewer elements are preferred over projections with more elements, and structures containing fewer projections are preferred over structures with more projections.
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  3. Jane Grimshaw, Last Resorts and Grammaticality.
    A “last resort” is argued to be nothing more than a winning, i.e. grammatical form, once it is understood in terms of competition between alternative candidates. It is a theorem of OT that we find last resort effects, since it follows from the nature of competition and constraint interaction.
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  4. Jane Grimshaw, Verbs, Nouns and Affixation∗∗∗.
    What explains the rich patterns of deverbal nominalization? Why do some nouns have argument structure, while others do not? We seek a solution in which properties of deverbal nouns are composed from properties of verbs, properties of nouns, and properties of the morphemes that relate them. The theory of each plus the theory of how they combine, should give the explanation. In exploring this, we investigate properties of two theories of nominalization. In one, the verb-like properties of deverbal nouns result (...)
     
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  5. Jane Grimshaw (2013). Response to Roberts. Mind and Language 28 (4):573-578.
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  6. Jane Grimshaw (2013). The Structure of Syntactic Typologies. Mind and Language 28 (4):538-559.
    This article illustrates how language variation and the limits of variation are given a shared and principled explanation in Optimality Theory. It shows that languages can be ‘uniform’, choosing the same grammatical structures in three different sentence types. They can also be ‘non-uniform’, but the combinations of grammatical structures that they can exhibit are extremely restricted. The theory characterizes possible and impossible grammatical systems without special stipulations or additional theoretical machinery.
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  7. Jane Grimshaw & Steven Pinker (1989). Positive and Negative Evidence in Language Acquistion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):341.
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  8. Jane Grimshaw (1987). The Components of Learnability Theory. In Jay L. Garfield (ed.), Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding. Mit Press. 207--220.
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  9. Lewis P. Shapiro, Edgar Zurif & Jane Grimshaw (1987). Sentence Processing and the Mental Representation of Verbs. Cognition 27 (3):219-246.
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