Search results for 'Jim Marshall' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jim Marshall (2008). Philosophy as Literature. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (3):383–393.score: 240.0
    How best to introduce philosophical ideas? Is the best and only way by studying the history of philosophy and its rational arguments and discussions? But can literature, usually hived off from philosophy, be used instead and can this be as effective as rational argument? This paper explores these questions. First it considers a text which introduces philosophy through the analysis of literature, in particular James Joyce's 'Araby', arguing that the traditional analytic approach employed by the text, by concentrating on epistemology, (...)
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  2. Michael A. Peters, Paulo Ghiraldelli, Steven Best, Ramin Farahmandpur, Jim Garrison, Douglas Kellner, James D. Marshall, Peter McLaren, Michael Peters, Björn Ramberg, Alberto Tosi Rodrigues, Juha Suoranta & Kenneth Wain (2001). Richard Rorty: Education, Philosophy, and Politics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 240.0
    This distinctive collection by scholars from around the world focuses upon the cultural, educational, and political significance of Richard Rorty's thought. The nine essays which comprise the collection examine a variety of related themes: Rorty's neopragmatism, his view of philosophy, his philosophy of education and culture, Rorty's comparison between Dewey and Foucault, his relation to postmodern theory, and, also his form of political liberalism.
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  3. A. C. Besley (2005). Jim Marshall: Foucault and Disciplining the Self. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):309–315.score: 150.0
    This paper notes how Jim influenced my own use of Foucault and also focuses on two of James Marshall's New Zealand oriented texts. In the first, Discipline and Punishment in New Zealand Education he provides a Foucauldian genealogy of New Zealand approaches to both punishment and discipline, in particular corporal punishment. The second, his 1996 book co‐written with Michael Peters, Individualism and Community: Education and Social Policy in the Postmodern Condition, analyses political philosophy and social and educational policy as (...)
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  4. Erik Marshall (2002). Fatal Strategies and Film Studies. Film-Philosophy 6 (3).score: 120.0
    Jean Baudrillard _Fatal Strategies_ Translated by Philip Beitchman and W. G. J. Niesluchowski Edited by Jim Fleming London: Pluto Press, 1999 ISBN 0-7453-1453-8 191 pp.
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  5. Paul Marshall (2005). Mystical Encounters with the Natural World: Experiences and Explanations. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Mystical experiences of the natural world bring a sense of unity, knowledge, self-transcendence, eternity, light, and love. This is the first detailed study of these intriguing phenomena. Paul Marshall surveys and evaluates a wide range of explanations put forward by religious thinkers, philosophers, and scientists, and offers his own perspective on the nature of these experiences.
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  6. James D. Marshall (1989). The Incompatibility of Punishment and Moral Education: A Reply to Peter Hobson. Journal of Moral Education 18 (2):144-147.score: 60.0
    Abstract In his paper ?The compatibility of punishment and moral education?, Hobson (1986) attempts to refute arguments which I had advanced (Marshall, 1984) to the effect that there were incompatibilities between claims to be morally educating children and to be punishing them. I wish to point out in Hobson's paper some questionable interpretations of the punishment literature and a serious flaw in the argument. More importantly, I wish to advance the debate by recourse to historical material and the work (...)
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  7. John Marshall (1998). Descartes's Moral Theory. Cornell University Press.score: 60.0
    In this long awaited volume, John Marshall invites us to reconsider Rene Descartes as an ethicist.
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  8. Eugene Marshall (2014). The Spiritual Automaton: Spinoza's Science of the Mind. OUP Oxford.score: 60.0
    Eugene Marshall presents an original, systematic account of Spinoza's philosophy of mind, in which the mind is presented as an affective mechanism that, when rational, behaves as a spiritual automaton. He explores key themes in Spinoza's thought, and illuminates his philosophical and ethical project in a striking new way.
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  9. M. Victoria Marshall (1996). Types in Class Set Theory and Inaccessible Cardinals. Archive for Mathematical Logic 35 (3):145-156.score: 60.0
    In this paper I prove the following theorems which are the converses of some results of Judah and Laver (1983) and of Judah and Marshall (1993).-IfKM+ATW is not an extension by definition ofKM (and the model involved is well founded), then the existence of two inaccessible cardinals is consistent with ZF.-IfKM+ATW is not a conservative extension ofKM (and the model involved is well founded), then the existence of an inaccessible number of inaccessible cardinals is consistent with ZF.whereKM is Kelley (...)
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  10. David L. Marshall (2010). Vico and the Transformation of Rhetoric in Early Modern Europe. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Considered the most original thinker in the Italian philosophical tradition, Giambattista Vico has been the object of much scholarly attention but little consensus. In this new interpretation, David L. Marshall examines the entirety of Vico's oeuvre and situates him in the political context of early modern Naples. He demonstrates Vico's significance as a theorist who adapted the discipline of rhetoric to modern conditions. Marshall presents Vico's work as an effort to resolve a contradiction. As a professor of rhetoric (...)
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  11. Cbe Marshall (ed.) (2005). Proceedings of the British Academy Volume 130, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, Iv. OUP/British Academy.score: 60.0
    Eleven obituaries of recently deceased Fellows of the British Academy: Isaiah Berlin; Christopher Hill; Rodney Hilton; Keith Hopkins; Peter Laslett; Geoffrey Marshall; John Roskell; Isaac Schapera; Ben Segal; John Cyril Smith and Richard Wollheim.
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  12. Jim Mackenzie (1995). Peters and Marshall on the Philosophy of the Subject. Educational Philosophy and Theory 27 (1):25–40.score: 36.0
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  13. Eugene Marshall (2008). Adequacy and Innateness in Spinoza. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 4:51-88.score: 30.0
  14. Eugene Marshall (2010). Spinoza on the Problem of Akrasia. European Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):41-59.score: 30.0
    : Two common ways of explaining akrasia will be presented, one which focuses on strength of desire and the other which focuses on action issuing from practical judgment. Though each is intuitive in a certain way, they both fail as explanations of the most interesting cases of akrasia. Spinoza's own thoughts on bondage and the affects follow, from which a Spinozist explanation of akrasia is constructed. This account is based in Spinoza's mechanistic psychology of cognitive affects. Because Spinoza's account explains (...)
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  15. Eugene Marshall (2008). Spinoza's Cognitive Affects and Their Feel. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):1 – 23.score: 30.0
  16. Colin R. Marshall (2009). The Mind and the Body as 'One and the Same Thing' in Spinoza. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (5):897-919.score: 30.0
    I argue that, contrary to how he is often read, Spinoza did not believe that the mind and the body were numerically identical. This means that we must find some alternative reading for his claims that they are 'one and the same thing' (I describe three such alternative readings).
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  17. Dan Marshall (2009). Can 'Intrinsic' Be Defined Using Only Broadly Logical Notions? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (3):646-672.score: 30.0
    An intrinsic property is roughly a property things have in virtue of how they are, as opposed to how they are related to things outside of them. This paper argues that it is not possible to give a definition of 'intrinsic' that involves only logical, modal and mereological notions, and does not depend on any special assumptions about either properties or possible worlds.
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  18. I. N. Marshall (1995). Some Phenomenological Implications of a Quantum Model of Consciousness. Minds and Machines 5 (4):609-20.score: 30.0
    We contrast person-centered categories with objective categories related to physics: consciousness vs. mechanism, observer vs. observed, agency vs. event causation. semantics vs. syntax, beliefs and desires vs. dispositions. How are these two sets of categories related? This talk will discuss just one such dichotomy: consciousness vs. mechanism. Two extreme views are dualism and reductionism. An intermediate view is emergence. Here, consciousness is part of the natural order (as against dualism), but consciousness is not definable only in terms of physical mass, (...)
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  19. Jonathan Marshall (1979). William Graham Sumner: Critic of Progressive Liberalism. Journal of Libertarian Studies 3 (3):261-277.score: 30.0
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  20. Pierre Hadot, tr Simmons, J. Aaron & ed Marshall, Mason (2005). There Are Nowadays Professors of Philosophy, but Not Philosophers. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (3):229-237.score: 30.0
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  21. Dan Marshall & Josh Parsons (2001). Langton and Lewis on 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):347-351.score: 30.0
  22. Patricia A. Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Abdallah S. Daar (1996). Marketing Human Organs: The Autonomy Paradox. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).score: 30.0
    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a gift of life and a commodity exchange. The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We (...)
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  23. Terence E. Marshall (1978). Rousseau and Enlightenment. Political Theory 6 (4):421-455.score: 30.0
  24. Kerry L. Pedigo & Verena Marshall (2009). Bribery: Australian Managers' Experiences and Responses When Operating in International Markets. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):59 - 74.score: 30.0
    Managers seeking to respect local norms when operating in cross-cultural settings may encounter ethical dilemmas when faced with values that potentially conflict with their own. The question of whose ethics or values should be applied or whether a set of universal eth- ical norms should be developed often confronts managers in their international business dealings. This article explores the findings from a qualitative research study that examines critical ethical dilemmas confronting Australian managers in their international business operations and their responses (...)
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  25. Peter W. Halligan & John C. Marshall (1998). Neglect of Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (3):356-380.score: 30.0
    We describe some of the signs and symptoms of left visuo-spatial neglect. This common, severe and often long-lasting impairment is the most striking consequence of right hemisphere brain damage. Patients seem to (over-)attend to the right with subsequent inability to respond to stimuli in contralesional space. We draw particular attention to how patients themselves experience neglect. Furthermore, we show that the neglect patient's loss of awareness of left space is crucial to an understanding of the condition. Even after left space (...)
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  26. S. E. Marshall (1999). Bodyshopping: The Case of Prostitution. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):139–150.score: 30.0
  27. John Marshall (1994). John Locke: Resistance, Religion, and Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
    A major account of the development of the political, religious, social and moral thought of John Locke.
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  28. Brian Weatherson & Dan Marshall (2012). Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Properties. In Edward N. Zalta (ed.), The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Fall 2014 Edition).score: 30.0
    I have some of my properties purely in virtue of the way I am. (My mass is an example.) I have other properties in virtue of the way I interact with the world. (My weight is an example.) The former are the intrinsic properties, the latter are the extrinsic properties. This seems to be an intuitive enough distinction to grasp, and hence the intuitive distinction has made its way into many discussions in ethics, philosophy of mind, metaphysics and even epistemology. (...)
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  29. Kimball P. Marshall (1999). Has Technology Introduced New Ethical Problems? Journal of Business Ethics 19 (1):81 - 90.score: 30.0
    Drawing on William F. Ogburn's cultural lag thesis, an inherent conflict is proposed between the rapid speed of modern technological advances and the slower speed by which ethical guidelines for utilization of new technologies are developed. Ogburn's cultural lag thesis proposes that material culture advances more rapidly than non-material culture. Technology is viewed as part of material culture and ethical guidelines for technology utilization are viewed as an adaptive aspect of non-material culture. Cultural lag is seen as a critical ethical (...)
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  30. G. D. Marshall (1970). Attention and Will. Philosophical Quarterly 20 (January):14-25.score: 30.0
  31. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1916). Retentiveness and Dreams. Mind 25 (98):206-222.score: 30.0
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  32. Patricia A. Marshall (1996). Introduction: Organ Transplantation — Defining the Boundaries of Personhood, Equity and Community. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).score: 30.0
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  33. D. Zohar & I. N. Marshall (1990). The Quantum Self. Morrow.score: 30.0
  34. Ruth Marshall (2010). The Sovereignty of Miracles:Pentecostal Political Theology in Nigeria. Constellations 17 (2):197-223.score: 30.0
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  35. James D. Marshall (2008). Wittgenstein, Freud, Dreaming and Education: Psychoanalytic Explanation as 'Une Façon de Parler'. Educational Philosophy and Theory 40 (5):606-620.score: 30.0
    Freud saw the dream as occupying a very important position in his theoretical model. If there were to be problems with his theoretical account of the dream then this would impinge upon proposed therapy and, of course, education as the right balance between the instincts and the institution of culture. Wittgenstein, whilst stating that Freud was interesting and important, raised several issues in relation to psychology/psychoanalysis, and to Freud in particular. Why would Wittgenstein have seen Freud as having some important (...)
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  36. Sarah Marshall (2003). Scanlon and Reasons. In Matt Matravers (ed.), Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy. Frank Cass 13-32.score: 30.0
    Scanlon's account of reasons is essential to his contractualism as a whole, providing an extensive foundation in practical reasoning for his theory. A full understanding of his account of reasons is therefore vital to understanding the nature of Scanlon's contractualism. With the aim of contributing to such an understanding, in this essay I reconstruct several of Scanlon's most significant arguments concerning reasons. I focus on two areas: his discussion of the role of desire in practical reasoning and his arguments for (...)
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  37. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1889). Prof. O. N. Rood, on Colour-Contrast. Mind 14 (54):312.score: 30.0
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  38. Colin Marshall (2009). Kant and Skepticism (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (2):pp. 319-320.score: 30.0
    Kant's theoretical philosophy is often read as a response to skeptical challenges raised by his predecessors. Yet Kant himself explicitly discusses skepticism in relatively few places in his published work, so Michael Forster's focused examination of Kant's relation to skepticism is a useful addition to the literature. Forster sets out to distinguish different types of skepticism to which Kant might be responding, determine what responses Kant offers, and evaluate the strength of those responses.Perhaps the most valuable part of the book (...)
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  39. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1889). The Classification of Pleasure and Pain. Mind 14 (56):511-536.score: 30.0
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  40. R. Scott Marshall (2011). Conceptualizing the International For-Profit Social Entrepreneur. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (2):183 - 198.score: 30.0
    This article looks at social entrepreneurs that operate for-profit and internationally, offering that international for-profit social entrepreneurs (IFPSE) are of a unique type. Initially, this article utilizes the entrepreneurship, social entrepreneurship, and international entrepreneurship literatures to develop a definition of the IFPSE. Next, a proposed model of the IFPSE is built utilizing the dimensions of mindset, opportunity recognition, social networks, and outcomes. Case studies of three IFPSE are then used to examine the proposed model. In the final section, findings from (...)
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  41. Norman A. Marshall (1980). Corrigibility and Inference. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (1/2):158-166.score: 30.0
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  42. Alan Marshall (2007). Questioning Nuclear Waste Substitution: A Case Study. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (1):83-98.score: 30.0
    This article looks at the ethical quandaries, and their social and political context, which emerge as a result of international nuclear waste substitution. In particular it addresses the dilemmas inherent within the proposed return of nuclear waste owned by Japanese nuclear companies and currently stored in the United Kingdom. The UK company responsible for this waste, British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL), wish to substitute this high volume intermediate-level Japanese-owned radioactive waste for a much lower volume of much more highly radioactive (...)
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  43. Peter Marshall (1981). Two Scholastic Discussions of the Perception of Depth by Shading. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 44:170-175.score: 30.0
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  44. Patricia A. Marshall (2005). Human Rights,Cultural Pluralism, and International Health Research. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):529-557.score: 30.0
    In the field of bioethics, scholars have begun to consider carefully the impact of structural issues on global population health, including socioeconomic and political factors influencing the disproportionate burden of disease throughout the world. Human rights and social justice are key considerations for both population health and biomedical research. In this paper, I will briefly explore approaches to human rights in bioethics and review guidelines for ethical conduct in international health research, focusing specifically on health research conducted in resource-poor settings. (...)
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  45. James D. Marshall (2002). Michel Foucault: Liberation, Freedom, Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):413–418.score: 30.0
  46. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1896). Consciousness and Biological Evolution. Mind 5 (19):367-387.score: 30.0
  47. Henry Rutgers Marshall (1919). Of Outer-World Objects. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 16 (2):46-50.score: 30.0
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  48. Mary Faith Marshall (2004). The Placebo Effect in Popular Culture. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):37-42.score: 30.0
    This paper gives an overview of the placebo effect in popular culture, especially as it pertains to the work of authors Patrick O’Brian and Sinclair Lewis. The beloved physician as placebo, and the clinician scientist as villain are themes that respectively inform the novels, The Hundred Days and Arrowsmith. Excerpts from the novels, and from film show how the placebo effect, and the randomized clinical trial, have emerged into popular culture, and evolved over time.
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  49. Douglas A. Marshall (2002). Behavior, Belonging, and Belief: A Theory of Ritual Practice. Sociological Theory 20 (3):360-380.score: 30.0
    A new model of ritual based on Durkheim's ([1912] 1995) theory is developed. It is argued that ritual practices generate belief and belonging in participants by activating multiple social-psychological mechanisms that interactively create the characteristic outcomes of ritual. Specifically, the distinctive elements of ritual practice are shown to induce altered subjective states and effortful and/or anomalous behaviors, which are subsequently misattributed in such a way that belief and belonging are created or maintained around the focus of ritual attention. These processes (...)
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