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Paul Jorion [10]Paul J. M. Jorion [5]
  1. Paul Jorion (2006). Keeping Up with the Joneses: The Desire of the Desire for Money. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):187-188.
    The biological basis of money lies in a three-term relationship between one subject and some others, with money acting as a mediator. The drive to acquire money is a special case of a desire for recognition. What is aimed at by subjects is their desire for the desire of some others: the former derive satisfaction from representing to themselves the admiration, or envy, of these others. This raises reproductive advantage. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  2. Paul J. M. Jorion (2000). The Elementary Units of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):483-484.
    Examining the implications of a localist model for linguistic performance, I show the strengths of the P-graph, a network of elementary units of meaning where utterance results from relaxation through the operation of a dynamics of affect values. A unit of meaning is stored in a synaptic connection that brings together two words. Such a model, consistent with the anatomy and physiology of the neural tissue, eschews a number of traditional pitfalls of “semantic networks”: (1) ambiguity ceases to be an (...)
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  3. Paul Jorion (1999). What Do Mathematicians Teach Us About the World ? An Anthropological Perspective. Philosophical Explorations.
    The activity of mathematicians is examined here in an anthropological perspective. The task effectively performed reveals that, independently of their own representation, mathematicians produce in actuality a « virtual physics ». The principles of demonstrative proof as described and assessed by Aristotle, are first introduced, displaying a latitude in the demonstrative methodology open to mathematicians, with modes of proof ranging from the compelling to the plausible only. Even such leeway in the matter of proof has been felt at times by (...)
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  4. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). Syntax, or, the Embryogenesis of Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (6):1027-1028.
    Syntax is better viewed as the dynamics of a morphogenetic field on a semantic universe of “content” words. This may take widely different forms, making the acquisition of any language by an aspiring speaker an entirely new experience. The existence of an underlying “universal syntax” might be illusory.
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  5. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). Thought as Word Dynamics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):295-295.
    A Hebbian model for speech generation opens a number of paths. A cross-linguistic scheme of functional relationships (inspired by Aristotle) dispenses with distraction by the “parts of speech” distinctions, while bridging the gap between “content” and “structure” words. A gradient model identifies emotional and rational dynamics and shows speech generation as a process where a speaker's dissatisfaction gets minimized.
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  6. Paul J. M. Jorion (1999). The Uncanny Power of Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):622-623.
    In their quality as acoustic or visual percepts, words are linked to the emotional values of the state-of-affairs they evoke. This allows them to engender meanings capable of operating nearly entirely detached from percepts. Such a laying flat of meanings permits deliberation to take place within the window of consciousness. In such a theatre of the imagination, linguistically triggered, resides the originality of the human psyche.
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  7. Paul J. M. Jorion (1998). A Methodological Behaviourist Model for Imitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (5):695-695.
    Byrne & Russon's target article displays all the difficulties encountered when one fails to take a methodological behaviourist approach to imitation. Their conceptual apparatus is grounded in a mixture of introspection and folk psychology. Their distinction between action-level and program-level imitation falters on goal imputation for sequential acts. In an alternative gradient descent model, behaviour can be simulated as a frustration/satisfaction gradient descent in the animal's “potentiality space,” as defined by knowledge, inventiveness, and the surrounding environment.
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  8. Paul Jorion (1997). Ce QUI Fait Encore Cruellement Défaut à l'Intelligence Artificielle. Philosophical Explorations.
    Artificial Intelligence still lacks an adequate theory of meaning. Maybe the obstacles we observe to the progress of AI are partially imaginary. We suppose for instance that there is an essential difference between opening a window « mechanically » because someone has asked us to do so and converting to a religion under the inspiration of a preacher. What if the phenomena were in fact of a similar nature: the power on a mind that a word has through its meaning (...)
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  9. Paul Jorion (1997). Jean Pouillon Et le Mystère de la Chambre Chinoise. Philosophical Explorations.
    In an article published in 1984, Jean Pouillon claimed that a better rendition of a text heard can be achieved when contents is ignored and attention is focused only on syntactic structure. I examine the implications of this statement in the light of Pouillon’s earlier Temps et Roman, a theory of the novel published in 1946. The fact is that if we know for certain what meaning to attach to categoremes (content words) we hardly know how to express the meaning (...)
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  10. Paul Jorion (1994). L'intelligence Artificielle au Confluent Des Neurosciences Et de L'Informatique. Philosophical Explorations.
    Artificial Intelligence betrays the special dispositions and traditions of the fields which constitute its ancestry: neuro-physiology, psychology, logic and mathematics. The common thread between the divergent pull of these fields emerges in a model of thought processes as a gradient on a ?memory trace? landscape. Paths generated on this landscape are interpretable as clauses displaying emergent logical properties.
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