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  1. To What Extent Can We Overcome the „Bystander Effects‟ of Collective Responsibility in Matters of Global Injustice?“.Isabelle Baker - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    Where do we draw the line between individual and collective responsibilities? Can collectives be „morally responsible‟ in the same way that individuals can? This paper explores the Bystander Effect – how an individual‟s sense of personal responsibility can become „diffused‟ when they become part of a collective. This is compared to the issue of the collective responsibility of the „developed world‟ to aid the „Third World‟ that ethicists, such Peter Singer and Iris Marion Young believe to be true. I consider (...)
     
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  2. Rethinking the Abortion Issue: The Problem of Normative Femininity and Hermeneutical Injustice.Millicent Churcher - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    To date the wealth of literature on abortion has been dedicated to resolving the question of its legal and moral permissibility in relation to the fetus and pregnant woman as subjects of moral standing. This has created a dichotomised way of talking about abortion chiefly in terms of conflicting rights; as a „wrongful‟ versus „legitimate‟ form of killing. The tension between this individualistic rights-based discourse and the „ethic of care‟ to which women are often expected to conform in their moral (...)
     
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  3. Does Socrates Vindicate The Coherence Theory Of Truth?Warren Deane - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    Within Plato's Socratic Dialogues we routinely observe the character of Socrates employing a formal, yet largely unexplained method of investigation into the beliefs that his interlocutors hold as true. Socrates even goes so far as to claim there will be discord within them their whole life should they not be able refute one of his controversial and counter-intuitive revealed truths. With the beliefs under investigation striking to the core of how one should live a good life, this paper seeks to (...)
     
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  4. Editorial: Issue 4.Dean Goorden & Mathew Paul - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
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  5. Morality is Not Good.Samuel Green - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    Moral nihilism (the denial of the existence of objective moral values) has been argued for for thousands of years. Despite such arguments this view is by no means the majority view. One of the most influential moral nihilists of the 20th Century was John Leslie Mackie, who gave arguments for this position. These arguments, despite many objections, have not been convincingly or decisively overcome. If the arguments are still good, why is moral nihilism such an uncommon view? One possible reason (...)
     
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  6. Embodied Understanding: On a Path Not Travelled in Gadamer's Hermeneutics.Kieran Owens - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    This article challenges and builds upon the language-centred model of understanding found in Gadamer‟s hermeneutics. The alternative that is developed employs a concept of embodied understanding, derived from the work of Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty, which is better able to comprehend that which lies on the borders of language such as animality, infant development and aesthetic experience.
     
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  7. Kierkegaard's Ontological and Ethical Conception of Christian Being.Benjamin Vialle - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers 4 (1).
    Though much philosophical and theological debate centres on various aspects of religious life, the very definition of a religious life in any given tradition is often unclear. This paper focuses on Christianity and asks, what does it mean to be a Christian? Kierkegaard‟s authorship offers an insightful conception of Christian being. An ontological account of being in „correct relation‟ and an ethical imperative to imitate Christ and love one‟s neighbour constitute Kierkegaard‟s idea of what it means to be a Christian. (...)
     
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  8. The Ethics of Belief.Michael Lopresto - 2011 - Emergent Australasian Philosophers (4):9.
    Most people think there are things we ought to believe, and things we ought not to believe, otherwise means-ends rationality wouldn‟t be possible. But are there things that we ought to believe, or ought not to believe, irrespective of our ends? Clifford (1879) and James (1896) have different views about how this question should be answered. Clifford has an absolutist view, that it is always morally wrong for one to believe something upon insufficient evidence or reasoning. James argues that there (...)
     
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