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  1. Contraception and Abortion: A Utilitarian View.Leslie Allan - manuscript
    Conservative and liberal approaches to the problem of abortion are oversimplified and deeply flawed. Accepting that the moral status of the conceptus changes during gestation, the author advances a more nuanced perspective. Through applying a form of rules in practice utilitarianism within the context of overall population policy, he provides a compelling ethical and legal framework for regulating contraception and abortion practices.
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  2. The Argument From Back-Street Abortion Revisited.Josiah Della Foresta - manuscript
    Motivated by recent political trends surrounding the legality of abortion, and noting the apparent difficulty with which partisan agreement can be found when engaging with arguments from foetal personhood, this paper revisits a classic axiological argument for the legalisation of abortion which relies on a commitment to the moral relevancy of consequences and the empirically sound nature of said consequences. Academically known as the Argument from Back-Street Abortion, agreement with the argument's premises entails the legalisation of abortion is morally obligatory, (...)
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  3. Self-Ownership and Abortion.Rajiv Shah - manuscript
    This paper argues that in the absence of general duties to rescue a woman may, at any time, terminate an unintended pregnancy even if the foetus is a person. However the rights of the foetus restrict the procedures one may use. In particular only an evictionist procedure may be used. Furthermore the argument presented does not rely on any act of balancing the rights of the woman against the rights of the foetus. There is no “clash of rights” involved. This (...)
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  4. Pregnant Women with Fetal Abnormalities: The Forgotten People in the Abortion Debate.L. De Crespigny & Savulescu, J. - manuscript
    of (from Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics) Medical Journal of Australia, 188 (2) 100 - 102.
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  5. Decriminalising Abortion in the UK. What Would It Mean?Ilaria Bertini - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  6. Don't Risk Homicide: Abortion After 10 Weeks Gestation.Matthew Braddock - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    When an abortion is performed, someone dies. Are we killing an innocent human person? Widespread disagreement exists. However, it’s not necessary to establish personhood in order to establish the wrongness of abortion: a substantial chance of personhood is enough. We defend The Don’t Risk Homicide Argument: abortions are wrong after 10 weeks gestation because they substantially and unjustifiably risk homicide, the unjust killing of an innocent person. Why 10 weeks? Because the cumulative evidence establishes a substantial chance (a more than (...)
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  7. Illegal Abortion and Reproductive Injustice in the Pacific Islands: A Qualitative Analysis of Court Data.Kate Burry, Kristen Beek, Lisa Vallely, Heather Worth & Bridget Haire - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  8. Illegal Abortion and Reproductive Injustice in the Pacific Islands: A Qualitative Analysis of Court Data.Kate Burry, Kristen Beek, Lisa Vallely, Heather Worth & Bridget Haire - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  9. The Duty to Protect, Abortion, and Organ Donation.Emily Carroll & Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    Some people oppose abortion on the grounds that fetuses have full moral status and thus a right to not be killed. We argue that special obligations that hold between mother and fetus also hold between parents and their children. We argue that if these special obligations necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of abortion, then they also necessitate the sacrifice of bodily autonomy in the case of organ donation. If we accept the argument that it is obligatory (...)
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  10. Decriminalising Abortion in the UK. What Would It Mean?Ilaria Bertini Dr - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-4.
    Decriminalising Abortion in the UK. What would it Mean, edited by Sally Sheldon and Kaye Wellings (Profess...
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  11. The Politics of Legal Abortion: From Direct Action to Dialogue.Jeffrey A. Gauthier - forthcoming - Hypatia:1-5.
    In her highly influential 1984 study Abortion and the Politics of Motherhood, Kristin Luker speculates that opposition to legal abortion among women was likely to be strongest among those who were full-time homemakers without a college education. But despite a marked decline in that demographic group and a well-documented rise in public support for gender equality since then, the rate of support for legal abortion has remained stubbornly fixed at between fifty and fifty-five percent. This tepid support has coincided with (...)
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  12. My Body, Not My Choice: Against Legalised Abortion.Perry Hendricks - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-107194.
    There are some cases in which the government should coerce its citizens into providing care to vulnerable persons. For example, suppose that a woman and her infant are snowed in a cabin, and that the only available food for the infant is her mother's breastmilk. The government should coerce the mother into breastfeeding her infant. This fact, however, has significant implications: first, it shows that David Boonin's recent argument for legalised abortion fails. And second, it shows that (given fetal personhood) (...)
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  13. The Axiology of Abortion: Should We Hope Pro-Choicers or Pro-Lifers Are Right?Perry Hendricks - forthcoming - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy.
    The ethics of abortion considers whether abortion is immoral. Pro-choice philosophers think that it is not immoral, while pro-life philosophers think that it is. The axiology of abortion considers whether world would be better if the pro-choice or pro-life position is right. While much attention has been given to the ethics of abortion, there has been no attention given to the axiology of abortion. In this article, I seek to change that. I consider various arguments for thinking our world would (...)
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  14. The Impairment Argument Against Abortion.Perry Hendricks - forthcoming - In Nicholas Colgrove, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger (eds.), Agency, Pregnancy, and Persons: Essays in Defense of Human Life.
    I provide an updated version of The Impairment Argument against abortion and respond to numerous objections that can be (and have been) raised to it.
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  15. Autonomy Rights and Abortion After the Point of Viability.Kristen Hine - forthcoming - Wiley: Bioethics.
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  16. Maternal Autonomy and Prenatal Harm.Nathan Robert Howard - forthcoming - Bioethics.
    Inflicting harm is generally preferable to inflicting death. If you must choose between the two, you should choose to harm. But prenatal harm seems different. If a mother must choose between harming her fetus or aborting it, she may choose either, at least in many cases. So it seems that prenatal harm is particularly objectionable, sometimes on a par with death. This paper offers an explanation of why prenatal harm seems particularly objectionable by drawing an analogy to the all-or-nothing problem. (...)
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  17. The Transition From Abortion to Miscarriage to Describe Early Pregnancy Loss in British Medical Journals: A Prescribed or Natural Lexical Change?Beth Malory - forthcoming - Medical Humanities:medhum-2021-012373.
    In British medical research, the transition from abortion to miscarriage, to describe early pregnancy loss, occurred in the late twentieth century. A 1985 letter to The Lancet by a group of eminent obstetricians was long considered unilaterally to have prompted this shift. More recently, however, this conclusion was challenged, and it was suggested instead that the transition constituted natural language change, as medical professionals responded to their changing social and professional milieu. This paper, however, uses a pioneering statistical modelling technique (...)
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  18. Love as a Journey in the Informed Consent Context: Legal Abortion in England and Wales as a Case Study.Caterina Milo - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-15.
    The right to informed consent, as established in the Supreme Court judgment in Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board [2015] UKSC 11, I claim involves a ‘journey of love’ between clinicians and...
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  19. Early and Later Abortions: Ethics and Law.Nathan Nobis - forthcoming - In Bob Fischer (ed.), Ethics Left and Right: The Moral Issues that Divide Us. Oxford University Press.
    Most abortions occur early in pregnancy. I argue that these abortions, and so most abortions, are not morally wrong and that the best arguments given to think that these abortions are wrong are weak. I also argue that these abortions, and probably all abortions, should be legal. -/- I begin by observing that people sometimes respond to the issue by describing the circumstances of abortion, not offering reasons for their views about those circumstances; I then dismiss “question-begging” arguments about abortion (...)
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  20. The Right to Choose to Abort an Abortion: Should Pro-Choice Advocates Support Abortion Pill Reversal?Michal Pruski, Dominic Whitehouse & Steven Bow - forthcoming - The New Bioethics:1-16.
    Abortion pill reversal treatment aims to halt an initiated medical abortion, wherein a pregnant woman takes progesterone after having taken the first of the two consecutive abortion pills, ty...
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  21. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - forthcoming - Tandf: The New Bioethics:1-4.
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  22. Border‐Crossing for Abortion: A Feminist Challenge to Border Theory.Amy Reed-Sandoval - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  23. Border‐Crossing for Abortion: A Feminist Challenge to Border Theory.Amy Reed-Sandoval - forthcoming - Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  24. Border‐Crossing for Abortion: A Feminist Challenge to Border Theory.Amy Reed-Sandoval - forthcoming - Wiley: Journal of Social Philosophy.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, EarlyView.
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  25. Public Health, Induced Abortion, and Spontaneous Abortion.William Simkulet - forthcoming - Wiley: Bioethics.
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  26. On Anti‐Abortion Violence.Jeremy Williams - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Anti‐abortion violence (‘AAV’) is anathema to almost everyone, on all sides of the abortion debate. Yet, as this article aims to show, it is far more difficult than has previously been recognised to avoid the deeply unpalatable conclusion that it can sometimes be justified. Some of the most frequently‐occupied positions on the morality of abortion will imply precisely that conclusion, I argue, unless conjoined with an especially stringent and unattractive form of pacifism. This is true not only of strict anti‐abortion (...)
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  27. On Anti‐Abortion Violence.Jeremy Williams - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
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  28. Your Mother Should Know: Pregnancy, the Ethics of Abortion, and Knowledge Through Acquaintance of Moral Value.Fiona Woollard - forthcoming - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
    An important strand in the debate on abortion focuses on the moral status of fetuses. Knowledge of the moral value of fetuses is needed to assess fetuses’ moral status. As Errol Lord argues, acquaintance plays a key role in moral and aesthetic knowledge. Many pregnant persons have acquaintance with their fetus that provides privileged access to knowledge about that fetus’ moral value. This knowledge is (a) very difficult to acquire without being pregnant and (b) relevant for assessing the moral status (...)
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  29. Can Prolife Theorists Justify an Exception for Rape?Bruce P. Blackshaw - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (1):49-53.
    Prolife theorists typically hold to the claim that all human beings possess equal moral status from conception and consequently possess a right to life. This, they believe, entails that abortion is impermissible in all circumstances. Critics characterize this as an extreme anti-abortion position, as it prima facie allows no exceptions, even in cases of rape. Here, I examine whether the prolife claim regarding equal moral status is compatible with a more attractive moderate stance that permits an exception in the case (...)
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  30. Why Inconsistency Arguments Fail: A Response to Shaw.Bruce P. Blackshaw, Nicholas Colgrove & Daniel Rodger - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):139-151.
    Opponents of abortion are commonly said to be inconsistent in their beliefs or actions, and to fail in their obligations to prevent the deaths of embryos and fetuses from causes other than induced...
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  31. Public Health Ethics and Abortion: A Response to Simkulet.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2022 - Wiley: Bioethics 36 (4):469-471.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 4, Page 469-471, May 2022.
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  32. The FDA Ought to Change Plan B’s Label.Christopher ChoGlueck - 2022 - Contraception 106.
    This commentary defends 3 arguments for changing the label of levonorgestrel-based emergency contraception (LNG EC) so that it no longer supports the possibility of a mechanism of action after fertilization. First, there is no direct scientific evidence confirming any postfertilization mechanisms. Second, despite the weight of evidence, there is still widespread public misunderstanding over the mechanism of LNG EC. Third, this FDA label is not a value-free claim, but instead it has functioned like a political tool for reducing contraceptive access. (...)
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  33. Viewing the Image? Ultrasound Examination During Abortion Preparations, Ethical Challenges.Marianne Kjelsvik, Ragnhild J. T. Sekse, Elin M. Aasen & Eva Gjengedal - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (2):511-522.
    During preparation for early abortion in Norway, an ultrasound examination is usually performed to determine gestation and viability. This article aims to provide a deeper understanding of women’s and health care personnel’s experiences with ultrasound viewing during abortion preparation in the first trimester. Qualitative in-depth interviews with women who had been prepared for early abortion and focus group interviews with HCP from gynaecological units were carried out. A hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis, inspired by van Manen, was chosen. Thirteen women who were pregnant (...)
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  34. Restrictions on Abortion, Social Justice and the Ethics of Research in Maternal-Fetal Therapy Trials.Mary Faith Marshall, Alaia Verite & Anne D. Lyerly - 2022 - American Journal of Bioethics 22 (3):78-81.
    At no time in recent decades has more attention been paid to ethical issues in pregnancy. Particularly riveting—and alarming, to many—was the passage of Senate Bill 8, a Texas law banning abortion...
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  35. Pathways to Affluence: Socioeconomic Incentives in Prenatal Testing and Abortion.Marsha Michie & Megan Allyse - 2022 - In Megan A. Allyse & Marsha Michie (eds.), Born Well: Prenatal Genetics and the Future of Having Children. Springer Verlag. pp. 105-122.
    In this chapter we discuss the ways in which a ‘healthy’ pregnancy is frequently seen as a more worthwhile pregnancy—and, by extension, evidence of maternal success—while deviation signals the pregnant woman’s failure. We argue that, as prenatal screening has continually expanded, so, too, has womens’ perceived duty to pre-emptively assess the value of their future child as an individual and as a productive citizen. The underlying assumptions of such calculations, how they have been mobilized to promote universal prenatal genetic screening, (...)
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  36. When Does “Life” Begin? When It Comes to Abortion, It Depends on What You Mean by "Life".Nathan Nobis - 2022 - Salon.
    To many, it seems like the debate of "when life begins" is irresolvable. This is unfortunate since this failure to make progress is largely a result of people not asking what the question means, or clarifying what is being asked, and listening carefully to try to understand the range of answers. -/- As a philosophy professor who teaches logic and critical thinking, I suggest that asking the simple, but powerful, question, "What do you mean?" and seeking to understand different answers (...)
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  37. Triumph and Concession? The Moral and Emotional Construction of Ireland's Campaign for Abortion Rights.Aideen Catherine O’Shaughnessy - 2022 - European Journal of Women's Studies 29 (2):233-249.
    In March 2018, the Irish government confirmed that a referendum would be held on 25 May, allowing for the Irish public to vote on the legalisation of abortion. The same month, Together for Yes – the national civil society campaign advocating for a ‘Yes’ vote in the referendum – was launched. This article draws upon findings from 27 in-depth interviews conducted in December 2019 and January 2020 with Irish abortion activists, to explore the moral and emotional construction of abortion within (...)
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  38. The Case for Telemedical Early Medical Abortion in England: Dispelling Adult Safeguarding Concerns.Jordan A. Parsons & Elizabeth Chloe Romanis - 2022 - Health Care Analysis 30 (1):73-96.
    Access to abortion care has been hugely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. This has prompted several governments to permit the use of telemedicine for fully remote care pathways, thereby ensuring pregnant people are still able to access services. One such government is that of England, where these new care pathways have been publicly scrutinised. Those opposed to telemedical early medical abortion care have raised myriad concerns, though they largely centre on matters of patient safeguarding. It is argued that healthcare professionals (...)
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  39. Abortion and the Veil of Ignorance: A Response to Minehan.Joona Räsänen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):411-412.
    In a recent JME paper, Matthew John Minehan applies John Rawls’ veil of ignorance against Judith Thomson’s famous violinist argument for the permissibility of abortion. Minehan asks readers to ‘imagine that one morning you are back to back in bed with another person. One of you is conscious and the other unconscious. You do not know which one you are’. Since from this position of ignorance, you have an equal chance of being the unconscious violinist and the conscious person attached (...)
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  40. Ethics of Fetal Reduction: A Reply to My Critics.Joona Räsänen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):142-143.
    In the article, Twin pregnancy, fetal reduction and the ‘all or nothing problem’, I argued that there is a moral problem in multifetal pregnancy reduction from a twin to a singleton pregnancy. Drawing on Horton’s original version of the ‘all or nothing problem’, I argued that there are two intuitively plausible claims in 2-to-1 MFPR: aborting both fetuses is morally permissible, aborting only one of the twin fetuses is morally wrong. Yet, with the assumption that one should select permissible choice (...)
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  41. Twin Pregnancy, Fetal Reduction and the 'All or Nothing Problem’.Joona Räsänen - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (2):101-105.
    Fetal reduction is the practice of reducing the number of fetuses in a multiple pregnancy, such as quadruplets, to a twin or singleton pregnancy. Use of assisted reproductive technologies increases the likelihood of multiple pregnancies, and many fetal reductions are done after in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer, either because of social or health-related reasons. In this paper, I apply Joe Horton’s all or nothing problem to the ethics of fetal reduction in the case of a twin pregnancy. I argue (...)
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  42. Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies.J. Burke Rea - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):83-86.
    In Disputes in Bioethics: Abortion, Euthanasia, and Other Controversies, Christopher Kaczor presents a series of his previously published articles addressing recent scholarship in bioethics. As suc...
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  43. The Politics of Reproduction: Adoption, Abortion, and Surrogacy in the Age of Neoliberalism Ed. By Modhumita Roy and Mary Thompson.Vorathep Sachdev - 2022 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 15 (1):194-198.
    Divya is a surrogate mother from India. Aaliyah, an African-American teenager, has just terminated her pregnancy. Samantha, on the other hand, is childless and looking for ways to adopt. What connects these three women? Other than being sites for reproduction, one tends to think nothing else brings them together. This fantastic book shows us otherwise by revealing the interconnection of three reproductive lifecycles through neoliberalism and its biopolitical impact on their "choices". Modhumita Roy and Mary Thompson have thematically married twelve (...)
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  44. Incoherent Abortion Exceptions.M. Scarfone - 2022 - Wiley: Journal of Social Philosophy 53 (1):127-140.
    Journal of Social Philosophy, Volume 53, Issue 1, Page 127-140, Spring 2022.
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  45. Killing and Impairing Fetuses.Prabhpal Singh - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):127-138.
    Could it be that if a fetus is not a person abortion is still immoral? One affirmative answer comes in the form of ‘The Impairment Argument’, which utilizes ‘The Impairment Principle’ to argue that abortion is immoral even if fetuses lack personhood. I argue ‘The Impairment Argument’ fails. It is not adequately defended from objections, and abortion is, in fact, a counterexample to the impairment principle. Furthermore, it explains neither what the wrong-making features of abortion are nor what features of (...)
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  46. Covid-19 and Arguments About Abortion.Trevor Stammers - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (1):1-3.
    Covid-19 and arguments related to abortion – these two topics between them take up the majority of the pages of this issue. That the first of these should do so, is no surprise. Over two years on f...
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  47. Fine-Tuning the Impairment Argument.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Perry Hendricks - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (9):641-642.
    Perry Hendricks’ original impairment argument for the immorality of abortion is based on the impairment principle (TIP): if impairing an organism to some degree is immoral, then ceteris paribus, impairing it to a higher degree is also immoral. Since abortion impairs a fetus to a higher degree than fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and giving a fetus FAS is immoral, it follows that abortion is immoral. Critics have argued that the ceteris paribus is not met for FAS and abortion, and so (...)
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  48. Strengthening the Impairment Argument Against Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Perry Hendricks - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (7):515-518.
    Perry Hendricks’ impairment argument for the immorality of abortion is based on two premises: first, impairing a fetus with fetal alcohol syndrome is immoral, and second, if impairing an organism to some degree is immoral, then ceteris paribus, impairing it to a higher degree is also immoral. He calls this the impairment principle. Since abortion impairs a fetus to a higher degree than FAS, it follows from these two premises that abortion is immoral. Critics have focussed on the ceteris paribus (...)
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  49. Miscarriage Can Kill … But It Usually Does Not: Evaluating Inconsistency Arguments.Jessalyn A. Bohn - 2021 - The New Bioethics 27 (3):245-265.
    Recent publications debate the value of inconsistency arguments. Here, I argue that 'Cause of Death Arguments' - inconsistency arguments that claim miscarriage causes death far more often than induced abortion - are unsound or invalid. 'Miscarriage' ambiguously refers both to intrauterine death, an outcome that does not itself cause death, and preterm delivery, which only sometimes causes death. The referential ambiguity also obscures actions people do take to prevent 'miscarriage.' When using the most plausible versions of each premise, these arguments (...)
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  50. DRUG FACTS, VALUES, AND THE MORNING-AFTER PILL.Christopher ChoGlueck - 2021 - Public Affairs Quarterly 35 (1):51-82.
    While the Value-Free Ideal of science has suffered compelling criticism, some advocates like Gregor Betz continue to argue that science policy advisors should avoid value judgments by hedging their hypotheses. This approach depends on a mistaken understanding of the relations between facts and values in regulatory science. My case study involves the morning-after pill Plan B and the “Drug Fact” that it “may” prevent implantation. I analyze the operative values, which I call zygote-centrism, responsible for this hedged drug label. Then, (...)
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