6 found
Order:
See also
  1.  10
    The Elements and Hobbesian Moral Thinking.Alan Cromartie - 2011 - History of Political Thought 32 (1):21-47.
    It is easy to read Hobbes's moral thinking as a deviant contribution to 'modern' natural law, especially if Leviathan (1651) is read through a lens provided by De Cive (1642). But The Elements of Law (1640) encourages the view that Hobbes's argument is 'physicalist', that is, that it requires no premises beyond those required by his physics of matter in motion. The Elements included a draft De Homine and its argument is intimately connected with De Cive's; it shows how such (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  38
    Hobbes, History, and Non-Domination.Alan Cromartie - 2009 - Hobbes Studies 22 (2):171-177.
    Pettit's and Skinner's stimulating books are open to historically-minded objections. Pettit's reading of Hobbes is Rousseauian, but he rejects the Hobbesian/Rousseauian belief that some modern people are driven by amour-propre/“glory”. If Hobbes is right, there is, in Pettit's sense, no “common good”. Skinner's treatment of the neo-Roman “theorists” over-estimates their self-consciousness and their consistency. Leviathan chapter 21 is not a response to neo-Romanism; it treats civil liberty as non-obligation, not as non-interference.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Thomas Hobbes: A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student, of the Common Laws of England.Alan Cromartie & Quentin Skinner (eds.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment on the issue of regal succession, 'Questions relative to Hereditary Right', discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. The former work is the last of Hobbes's major political writings. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, it should be essential reading for anybody (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4.  15
    Thomas Hobbes: Writings on Common Law and Hereditary Right: A Dialogue Between a Philosopher and a Student, of the Common Laws of England. Questions Relative to Hereditary Right.Alan Cromartie & Quentin Skinner (eds.) - 2005 - Clarendon Press.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment 'Questions relative to Hereditary Right', discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, the Dialogue should be essential reading for anybody interested in English political thought or legal theory. Cromartie has established when and why the work (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Thomas Hobbes: Writings on Common Law and Hereditary Right.Alan Cromartie & Quentin Skinner (eds.) - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    A critical edition of two great works by Thomas Hobbes. The Dialogue of the Common Laws is his classic critique of common law, essential reading for anyone interested in English political thought or legal theory. It is accompanied by Hobbes's last word on politics, a fragment in which he mounts a robust defence of hereditary right.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Writings on Common Law and Hereditary Right.Alan Cromartie & Quentin Skinner (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This volume in the Clarendon Edition of the Works of Thomas Hobbes contains A dialogue between a philosopher and a student, of the common laws of England, edited by Alan Cromartie, supplemented by the important fragment on the issue of regal succession, 'Questions relative to Hereditary Right', discovered and edited by Quentin Skinner. The former work is the last of Hobbes's major political writings. As a critique of common law by a great philosopher, it should be essential reading for anybody (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark