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Diego Lucci
American University in Bulgaria
  1.  4
    The Biblical Roots of Locke's Theory of Personal Identity.Diego Lucci - 2021 - Zygon 56 (1):168-187.
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  2. La Memoria Del Male: Percorsi Tra Gli Stermini Del Novecento E Il Loro Ricordo.Paolo Bernardini, Diego Lucci & Gadi Luzzatto Voghera (eds.) - 2006 - Cleup.
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  3.  15
    Ante-Nicene Authority and the Trinity in Seventeenth-Century England.Diego Lucci - 2018 - Intellectual History Review 28 (1):101-124.
    This article investigates the growth and decline of the use of the ante-Nicene Fathers in relation to Trinitarian issues in seventeenth-century Anglican apologetics. Anglican apologists referred to the writings of the ante-Nicene Fathers as the earliest and most reliable testimonies of Christianity contra what they perceived as Popish, Puritan, and Socinian corruptions of the true religion. On the other hand, Catholic, Reformed, and anti-Trinitarian polemicists stigmatized the incompatibility of the ante-Nicenes’ writings with the Trinitarian dogma formulated at Nicaea and elaborated (...)
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    An Eighteenth-Century Skeptical Attack on Rational Theology and Positive Religion: 'Christianity Not Founded on Argument' by Henry Dodwell the Younger.Diego Lucci - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (4):453-478.
    In the early 1740s, one book caused turmoil and debate among the English cultural elites of the time. Entitled Christianity Not Founded on Argument, it was attributed to Henry Dodwell the Younger (1706-1784). This book went through four editions between 1741 and 1746, and the controversy that followed its publication involved some of the major figures of English religious thought in the mid-eighteenth century. Dodwell purposely led a skeptical attack on any sort of rational theology, including deistic doctrines of natural (...)
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    Christian Hebraism in the Reformation Era (1500–1660): Authors, Books, and the Transmission of Jewish Learning.Diego Lucci - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (2):279-281.
  6.  22
    “God Does Not Act Arbitrarily, or Interpose Unnecessarily:” Providential Deism and the Denial of Miracles in Wollaston, Tindal, Chubb, and Morgan.Diego Lucci & Jeffrey R. Wigelsworth - 2015 - Intellectual History Review 25 (2):167-189.
    The philosophical debate on miracles in Enlightenment England shows the composite and evolutionary character of the English Enlightenment and, more generally, of the Enlightenment’s relation to religion. In fact, that debate saw the confrontation of divergent positions within the Protestant field and led several deists and freethinkers to resolutely deny the possibility of “things above reason” (i.e. things that, according to such Protestant philosophers as Robert Boyle and John Locke, human reason can neither comprehend nor refute, and that humanity must (...)
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  7. John Locke's Christianity.Diego Lucci - 2021 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    John Locke's religious interests and concerns permeate his philosophical production and are best expressed in his later writings on religion, which represent the culmination of his studies. In this volume, Diego Lucci offers a thorough analysis and reassessment of Locke's unique, heterodox, internally coherent version of Protestant Christianity, which emerges from The Reasonableness of Christianity and other public as well as private texts. In order to clarify Locke's views on morality, salvation, and the afterlife, Lucci critically examines Locke's theistic ethics, (...)
     
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  8.  6
    L’Ateismo Dei Moderni. Filosofia E Negazione di Dio da Spinoza a D’Holbach.Diego Lucci - 2018 - Journal of Early Modern Studies 7 (2):118-124.
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