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  1.  12
    The French Reception of Völkerpsychologie and the Origins of the Social Sciences.Egbert Klautke - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):293-316.
    This article reconstructs French readings and debates of German approaches to Vlkerpsychologie was a symptomatic approach during a transformative period in German, and indeed European, intellectual history: based on the idea of progressand on the belief in the primordial importance of the Volk, it represented the mindset of in an almost pure form. The relevance and importance of Vlkerpsychologie was not restricted to German academics: it was in France where central elements of VThlestin Bougle, Emile Durkheim, and Marcel Mausssocial sciencelkerpsychologie (...)
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  2.  14
    Defining the Volk: Willy Hellpach's Völkerpsychologie Between National Socialism and Liberal Democracy, 1934–1954.Egbert Klautke - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (5):693-708.
    This article introduces the Völkerpsychologie of the German psychologist and liberal politician Willy Hellpach. It shows how Hellpach used the once venerable approach of Völkerpsychologie, introduced by Moritz Lazarus and Heymann Steinthal in the nineteenth century, to adapt to the Third Reich and distract the authorities from his political career. The article provides a close reading of Hellpach's main text on the subject, the Einführung in die Völkerpsychologie published in 1938, and explains the ease with which he was able to (...)
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  3.  22
    ‘The Germans Are Beating Us at Our Own Game’: American Eugenics and the German Sterilization Law of 1933.Egbert Klautke - 2016 - History of the Human Sciences 29 (3):25-43.
    This article assesses interactions between American and German eugenicists in the interwar period. It shows the shifting importance and leading roles of German and American eugenicists: while interactions and exchanges between German and American eugenicists in the interwar period were important and significant, it remains difficult to establish direct American influence on Nazi legislation. German experts of race hygiene who advised the Nazi government in drafting the sterilization law were well informed about the experiences with similar laws in American states, (...)
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