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Eric J. Loomis [5]Eric Loomis [4]Eric John Loomis [1]
  1.  98
    Analyticity.Cory Juhl & Eric Loomis - 2009 - Routledge.
    Analyticity, or the 'analytic/synthetic' distinction is one of the most important and controversial problems in contemporary philosophy. It is also essential to understanding many developments in logic, philosophy of language, epistemology and metaphysics. In this outstanding introduction to analyticity Cory Juhl and Eric Loomis cover the following key topics: The origins of analyticity in the philosophy of Hume and Kant Carnap's arguments concerning analyticity in the early twentieth century Quine's famous objections to analyticity in his classic 'Two Dogmas of Empiricism' (...)
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  2. Empirical Equivalence in the Quine-Carnap Debate.Eric J. Loomis - 2006 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 87 (4):499–508.
    Alexander George has put forward a novel interpretation of the Quine-Carnap debate over analyticity. George argues that Carnap's claim that there exists an analytic-synthetic distinction was held by Carnap to be empty of empirical consequences. As a result, Carnap understood his position to be empirically indistinguishable from Quine's. Although George defends his interpretation only briefly, I show that it withstands further examination and ought to be accepted. The consequences of accepting it undermine a common understanding of Quine's criticism of Carnap, (...)
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  3. Necessity, the a Priori, and the Standard Meter.Eric Loomis - 1999 - Synthese 121 (3):291-307.
    This article critically examines Saul Kripke's (1972) argument for the separability of necessary truths from truths known a priori, focusing on his criticism of the standard meter case presented by Wittgenstein (1968). It attempts to show that Kripke's argument is unworkable on any of several readings. Wittgenstein's own broadly conventionalist account of necessary truth is then considered in the light of the standard meter example.
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  4. Eternal Truth by Convention.Eric J. Loomis - unknown
    Within the epistemology of the sciences, conventionalism has been the subject of regular criticism for over six decades. Critics such as W. V. Quine and Morton White, and more recently Nathan Salmon (1992), and Paul Boghossian (1996), have attacked even the most basic tenet of conventionalism, namely its claim that the truth of certain statements is fixed not by stipulation-independent facts, but by the conventions governing the meaning of those statements and their constituents.
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  5. Criteria and Defeasibility : When Good Evidence is Not Good Enough.Eric J. Loomis - 2007 - In Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (ed.), Perspicuous Presentations: Essays on Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Psychology. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  6.  54
    Logical Form and Propositional Function in the Tractatus.Eric J. Loomis - 2005 - Theoria 71 (3):215-240.
    Wittgenstein's Tractatus carefully distinguished the concept all from\nthe notion of a truth-function, and thereby from the quantifiers.\nI argue that Wittgenstein's rationale for this distinction is lost\nunless propositional functions are understood within the context\nof his picture theory of the proposition. Using a model Tractatus\nlanguage, I show how there are two distinct forms of generality implicit\nin quantified Tractatus propositions. Although the explanation given\nin the Tractatus for this distinction is ultimately flawed, the distinction\nitself is a genuine one, and the forms of generality that (...)
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  7. Speaking of Logical Form: The Tractatus and Carnap’s Logical Syntax of Language.Eric Loomis - 2005 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 8.
    Carnap’s Logical Syntax of Language was one of the first philosophical applications of the results in logical metatheory that appeared in the early 1930s. In using these results, Carnap claimed that he stood in general agreement with Wittgenstein’s Tractatus, but had overcome the limits on the scope of logic that Wittgenstein believed he had found. I argue that Carnap had in fact presupposed a conception of linguistic meaning fundamentally at odds with that presented in the Tractatus, and that he had (...)
     
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  8.  5
    Speaking of Logical Form: The Tractatus and Carnap’s Logical Syntax of Language.Eric J. Loomis - 2005 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 8 (1):176-202.
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  9.  13
    Review of Ilham Dilman, Wittgenstein's Copernican Revolution: The Question of Linguistic Idealism[REVIEW]Eric Loomis - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (7).
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