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  1. Reconstructing the Right to Privacy.Mark Alfino & G. Randolph Mayes - 2003 - Social Theory & Practice 29 (1):1-18.
    The article undertakes to develop a theory of privacy considered as a fundamental moral right. The authors remind that the conception of the right to privacy is silent on the prospect of protecting informational privacy on consequentialist grounds. However, laws that prevent efficient marketing practices, speedy medical attention, equitable distribution of social resources, and criminal activity could all be justified by appeal to informational privacy as a fundamental right. Finally, the authors show that in the specter of terrorism, privacy can (...)
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  2.  72
    Argument-Explanation Complementarity and the Structure of Informal Reasoning.G. Randolph Mayes - 2010 - Informal Logic 30 (1):92-111.
    Argument and explanation are distinct forms of reasoning with an underappreciated complementary relationship. In this essay I define these terms precisely, identify the mischief that results from conflating them, elucidate their complementary relationship and employ this relationship to provide a fruitful approach to analyzing the logical structure of the common editorial.
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    Reconstructing the Right to Privacy.G. Randolph Mayes - 2003 - Social Theory and Practice 29 (1):1-18.
  4.  59
    The Internal Aspect of Law: Rethinking Hart’s Contribution to Legal Positivism.G. Randolph Mayes - 1989 - Social Theory and Practice 15 (2):231-255.
  5.  91
    Naturalizing Cruelty.G. Randolph Mayes - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (1):21–34.
    Cruelty is widely regarded to be a uniquely human trait. This follows from a standard definition of cruelty as involving the deliberate infliction of suffering together with the empirical claim that humans are unique in their ability to attribute suffering (or any mental state) to other creatures. In this paper I argue that this definition is not optimum for the purposes of scientific inquiry. I suggest that its intuitive appeal stems from our abhorrence of cruelty, and our corresponding desire to (...)
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  6. Resisting Explanation.G. Randolph Mayes - 2000 - Argumentation 14 (4):361-380.
    Although explanation is widely regarded as an important concept in the study of rational inquiry, it remains largely unexplored outside the philosophy of science. This, I believe, is not due to oversight as much as to institutional resistance. In analytic philosophy it is basic that epistemic rationality is a function of justification and that justification is a function of argument. Explanation, however, is not argument nor is belief justification its function. I argue here that the task of incorporating explanation into (...)
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  7.  66
    Beware the Convincing Explanation.G. Randolph Mayes - 2011 - Think 10 (28):17-26.
    Most advice for sharpening our thinking skills concerns how to avoid bad arguments. But argument is only one of the two basic forms of reasoning. The other is explanation, and it is equally susceptible to abuse. You may already be familiar with certain forms of explanatory malfeasance. One of the best known is circular explanation, in which the stated cause is just a different way of describing the effect. Here I'd like to introduce you to a less appreciated error of (...)
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  8. Theories of Explanation.G. Randolph Mayes - 2001 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
     
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  9.  40
    Rationality and the Right to Privacy.Mark Alfino & G. Randolph Mayes - 2001 - In Daniel Bonevac (ed.), Today's Moral Issues. Mayfield Publishing.
    When tennis fan Jane Bronstein attended the 1995 U.S. Open she probably knew there was a remote chance her image would end up on television screens around the world. But she surely did not know she was at risk of becoming the object of worldwide attention on the David Letterman Show. As it happened, Letterman spotted an unflattering clip from the U.S. Open showing a heavyset Bronstein with peach juice dripping down her chin. Not only did he show the footage (...)
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  10.  12
    Rationality and the Right to Privacy.G. Randolph Mayes & Mark Alfino - unknown
    When tennis fan Jane Bronstein attended the 1995 U.S. Open she probably knew there was a remote chance her image would end up on television screens around the world. But she surely did not know she was at risk of becoming the object of worldwide attention on the David Letterman Show. As it happened, Letterman spotted an unflattering clip from the U.S. Open showing a heavyset Bronstein with peach juice dripping down her chin. Not only did he show the footage (...)
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  11. Ross and Scotus on the Existence of God: Two Proofs From Possibility.G. Randolph Mayes - 1990 - The Thomist 54 (1):97-114.
    In his Philosophical Theology James Ross claims to have uncovered an assumption essential to the proof of God's existence advanced by Duns Scotus: the equivalence of logical and real possibility. Ross argues that the omission is reparable, and that Scotus's proof is ultimately satisfactory. In this paper I examine his claim and determine that while Scotus may have believed there to be a significant connection between these two concepts, his proof of God does not depend on it. Ross's attempt to (...)
     
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