24 found
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  1. Murphy on Postmodernity, Science, and Religion.J. Wesley Robbins - 1998 - Zygon 33 (3):463-466.
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  2. Pragmatism, Critical Realism, and the Cognitive Value of Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1999 - Zygon 34 (4):655-666.
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  3. Broken-Backed Naturalism.J. Wesley Robbins - 1997 - Zygon 32 (4):585-592.
    While reading, and thinking about how to respond to, Willem Drees’s Religion, Science and Naturalism, I was reminded of an earlier dispute between George Santayana and John Dewey about, among other things, how to incorporate religion into a naturalistic world view. Dewey described Santayana’s naturalism as "broken backed" because of his dualistic distinction between the mechanism of nature and the life of the mind and his relegation of religion to the latter, epiphenomenal realm.
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  4.  86
    Seriously, but Not Literally: Pragmatism and Realism in Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1988 - Zygon 23 (3):229-245.
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  5.  90
    A Neopragmatist Perspective on Religion and Science.J. Wesley Robbins - 1993 - Zygon 28 (3):337-349.
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  6.  57
    Is Belief in God Properly Basic?J. Wesley Robbins - 1983 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 14 (4):241 - 248.
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  7.  14
    When Christians Become Naturalists.J. Wesley Robbins - 1992 - Religious Studies 28 (2):195.
    The classical pragmatists were as concerned as any of their modern philosophical predecessors that the moral and religious aspects of human life not be swamped by the successes of the physical sciences. It was John Dewey, after all, who said that The problem of restoring integration and cooperation between man's beliefs about the world in which he lives and his beliefs about the values and purposes that should direct his conduct is the deepest problem of modern life. It is the (...)
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  8.  42
    Is Naturalism Irrational?J. Wesley Robbins - 1994 - Faith and Philosophy 11 (2):255-259.
    Alvin Plantinga titles the closing chapter of his book Warrant and Proper Function "Is Naturalism Irrational?" He answers that it is. More precisely, he claims that anyone who is aware of the epistemological argument that he presents in this chapter has an unavoidable reason to doubt the combination of naturalism (according to which there is no God as conceived of in traditional theism) and evolutionary theory (according to which our cognitive capabilities are the products of blind processes operating on genetic (...)
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  9.  13
    C. B. Martin on Religious Experience.J. Wesley Robbins - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 53 (2):167-171.
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  10.  37
    If Our Genes Are for Us, Who Can Be Against Us? Thoughts of a Pragmatist on Science and Morality.J. Wesley Robbins - 1995 - Zygon 30 (3):357-367.
    The philosopher Michael Ruse accounts for the difference between hypothetical and categorical imperatives, and thus the origin of distinctively moral obligations like that of altruism, in genetic terms. This is part of an attempt to develop a philosophy that takes Darwin seriously by substituting respectable scientific entities, specifically those of evolutionary biology, for suspect theological or philosophical ones, like God or the transcendental ego, as a basis for addressing philosophical questions. Pragmatists take Darwin seriously, but in a very different way (...)
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  11.  34
    John Hick on Religious Experience and Perception.J. Wesley Robbins - 1974 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (2):108 - 118.
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  12.  26
    Science and Religion: Critical Realism or Pragmatism? [REVIEW]J. Wesley Robbins - 1987 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 21 (2):83 - 94.
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  13.  16
    Does Belief In God Need Proof?J. Wesley Robbins - 1985 - Faith and Philosophy 2 (3):272-286.
  14.  4
    Pragmatism and Religious Freedom.J. Wesley Robbins - 1999 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 20 (1):3 - 14.
    Pragmatism is first and foremost an intellectual self-image. It is a unique way of understanding the mental abilities that distinguish we humans from other living things on earth. The pragmatist description of our mind and its relationship to the rest of the world is a relatively new one. It has its roots in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century work of Charles Sanders Peirce, William James, and John Dewey. These philosophers, influenced by Darwinian biology among other things, redefined the (...)
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  15.  7
    Neo-Pragmatism and the Philosophy of Experience.J. Wesley Robbins - 1993 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 14 (2):177 - 187.
    The organizers of the 1992 Highlands Institute seminar were kind enough to invite me to comment as a neo-pragmatist on John E. Smith's keynote paper "Experience, God, and Classical American Philosophy." It is my pleasure to do so. I read portions of both GOD AND EXPERIENCE and THE ANALOGY OF EXPERIENCE when they were published. I was impressed then, and continue to be impressed, with Professor Smith's intellectually responsible and powerful defense of Christianity, carried out, as it was, in a (...)
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  16. A Common Faith Revisited.J. Wesley Robbins - manuscript
    John Dewey's A Common Faith is an exercise in cultural innovation. In those lectures Dewey re-works some of the key words from traditional Christianity into vocabulary for what amounts to a new, humanistic, religion. Faith is made to be a matter of devotion to ideals that are imaginatively projected out of goods currently enjoyed. Divinity becomes a function, that of uniting ideals with one another and with actual conditions.
     
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  17. Pragmatism and American Public Religion.J. Wesley Robbins - manuscript
    William Dean is a tireless proponent of a public role for religion in American society, most recently in his American Academy of Religion award winning book The Religious Critic in American Culture . He writes there about the importance of, and need for, both a common American spiritual culture and public intellectuals who would understand, criticize, and innovatively rework that shared American religion. Dean represents a metaphysical strand of American pragmatism. His thought is rooted in William James’s radical empiricism, Bernard (...)
     
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  18. Pragmatism and Christianity.J. Wesley Robbins - manuscript
    I will, first, describe my brand of pragmatism. Then, second, I will use it to discuss two beliefs that have played an important role in American religious history, the belief that America is a Christian nation and the belief in religious freedom.
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  19. Religious Naturalism: Humanistic Versus Theistic.J. Wesley Robbins - manuscript
    We Americans put a lot of stock in ingenuity. We admire people who come up with better mousetraps or with better ways to predict economic cycles. William James, in his early essay "Great Men and Their Environment," was the first American pragmatist to suggest that there are interesting analogies between the roles that ingenious people play in social change and bearers of genetic variations play in biological evolution.(1) He proposed that the categories in terms of which we conduct various cultural (...)
     
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  20. Two Pragmatisms: Comments on Sheila Davaney's.J. Wesley Robbins - manuscript
    Sheila Davaney’s Pragmatic Historicism provides yet another opportunity for us to discuss disagreements between two kinds of pragmatism. One, which I espouse, is a non-metaphysical pragmatism. It is rooted in James’s and Dewey’s appropriation of Darwinian biology for philosophical purposes and, more recently, Donald Davidson’s philosophy of language. Richard Rorty is its most influential contemporary spokesman. The other is a metaphysical pragmatism. It is rooted in James’s radical empiricism and Whitehead’s process philosophy. In the Highlands Institute, William Dean and now (...)
     
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  21.  4
    Donald Davidson and Religious Belief.J. Wesley Robbins - 1996 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 17 (2):141 - 155.
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  22.  3
    Democracy and Pragmatism: A Reply to Malone-France.J. Wesley Robbins - 2003 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 24 (2):169 - 180.
  23.  3
    God-Less Pragmatism.J. Wesley Robbins - 2004 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 25 (2):157 - 162.
  24.  4
    Critical Comment: Folk Psychology Versus the Metaphysics of Subjectivity.J. Wesley Robbins - 1998 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 19 (1):107 - 111.