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  1.  17
    Timing: A Missing Key Ingredient in Typical fMRI Studies of Emotion.Christian E. Waugh & James A. Schirillo - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (3):170-171.
    Lindquist et al. provide a compelling summary of the brain bases of the onset of emotion. Their conclusions, however, are constrained by typical fMRI techniques that do not assess a key ingredient in emotional experience – timing. We discuss the importance of timing in theories of emotion as well as the implications of neural temporal dynamics for psychological constructionism.
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  2.  10
    Hemispheric Laterality Measured in Rembrandt's Portraits Using Pupil Diameter and Aesthetic Verbal Judgements.W. Ryan Powell & James A. Schirillo - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):868-885.
  3.  48
    Color Memory Penetrates Early Vision.James A. Schirillo - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):393-393.
    Pylyshyn's concentration on form perception to demonstrate that early vision is cognitively impenetrable neglects that color perception is also part of early vision. Thus, the finding of Duncker (1939), Bruner et al. (1951), and Delk and Fillenbaum (1965) that the expected color of objects affects how they are perceived challenges Pylyshyn's thesis.
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  4.  21
    Self-Control: Acts of Free Will.James A. Schirillo - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):141-141.
    Rachlin overlooks that free will determines when and in what direction acts that appear impulsive will occur. Because behavioral patterns continuously evolve, animals are not guaranteed when they will, or how to, maximize larger-later reinforcements. An animal therefore uses self-control to emit free acts to vary behavioral patterns to optimize larger-later rewards.
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  5.  38
    The Sensorimotor Contingency of Multisensory Localization Correlates with the Conscious Percept of Spatial Unity.Gwendolyn E. Roberson, Mark T. Wallace & James A. Schirillo - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1001-1002.
    Two cross-modal experiments provide partial support for O'Regan & Noë's (O&N's) claim that sensorimotor contingencies mediate perception. Differences in locating a target sound accompanied by a spatially disparate neutral light correlate with whether the two stimuli were perceived as spatially unified. This correlation suggests that internal representations are necessary for conscious perception, which may also mediate sensorimotor contingencies.
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  6.  27
    When Dominance and Sex Are Both Right.James A. Schirillo & Melissa Fox - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):612-613.
    We have found that the left side of faces displayed in Rembrandt's portraits capture how humans rank male dominance, helping to coordinate avoidance behaviors among asymmetric individuals. Moreover, the left side of faces may also coordinate approach responses, like attractiveness, in human females. Therefore, adding sexual selection to dominance paints a more realistic picture of what the contralateral right hemisphere is doing.
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  7.  16
    Spatial Phenomenology Requires Potential Illumination.James A. Schirillo - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):425-426.
    Collapsing three-dimensional space into two violates Lehar's “volumetric mapping” constraint and can cause the visual system to construct illusory transparent regions to replace voxels that would have contained illumination. This may underlie why color constancy is worse in two dimensions, and argues for Lehar to revise his phenomenal spatial model by putting “potential illumination” in empty space.
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