18 found
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  1.  17
    Serial Participation and the Ethics of Phase 1 Healthy Volunteer Research.Rebecca L. Walker, Marci D. Cottingham & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (1):83-114.
    Phase 1 healthy volunteer clinical trials—which financially compensate subjects in tests of drug toxicity levels and side effects—appear to place pressure on each joint of the moral framework justifying research. In this article, we review concerns about phase 1 trials as they have been framed in the bioethics literature, including undue inducement and coercion, unjust exploitation, and worries about compromised data validity. We then revisit these concerns in light of the lived experiences of serial participants who are income-dependent on phase (...)
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  2.  12
    To Report or Not to Report: Exploring Healthy Volunteers' Rationales for Disclosing Adverse Events in Phase I Drug Trials.Lisa McManus & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (2):82-90.
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  3.  5
    Research Payment and Its Social Justice Concerns.Jill A. Fisher - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (9):35-36.
    Volume 19, Issue 9, September 2019, Page 35-36.
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  4.  3
    Appraising Harm in Phase I Trials: Healthy Volunteers' Accounts of Adverse Events.Lisa McManus, Arlene Davis, Rebecca L. Forcier & Jill A. Fisher - 2019 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 47 (2):323-333.
    While risk of harm is an important focus for whether clinical research on humans can and should proceed, there is uncertainty about what constitutes harm to a trial participant. In Phase I trials on healthy volunteers, the purpose of the research is to document and measure safety concerns associated with investigational drugs, and participants are financially compensated for their enrollment in these studies. In this article, we investigate how characterizations of harm are narrated by healthy volunteers in the context of (...)
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  5.  42
    Procedural Misconceptions and Informed Consent: Insights From Empirical Research on the Clinical Trials Industry.Jill A. Fisher - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (3):251-268.
    : This paper provides a simultaneously reflexive and analytical framework to think about obstacles to truly informed consent in social science and biomedical research. To do so, it argues that informed consent often goes awry due to procedural misconceptions built into the research context. The concept of procedural misconception is introduced to describe how individuals respond to what is familiar in research settings and overlook what is different. In the context of biomedical research, procedural misconceptions can be seen to function (...)
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  6.  44
    Expanding the Frame of "Voluntariness" in Informed Consent: Structural Coercion and the Power of Social and Economic Context.Jill A. Fisher - 2013 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4):355-379.
    Whether intended or not, conceptions of informed consent are often rooted in archetypal notions of the researcher and prospective study participant. The former is assumed problematically to be a disinterested yet humanitarian individual who is well trained to conduct robust science. The latter is often characterized as being motivated by some altruistic notions about the contribution to science and society they are making even as they seek some personal benefit from the research. Cast in a dyad, the researcher has the (...)
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  7.  16
    Introduction.Raymond de Vries & Jill A. Fisher - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (4):389-390.
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  8.  3
    "My Body is One of the Best Commodities": Exploring the Ethics of Commodification in Phase I Healthy Volunteer Clinical Trials.Rebecca L. Walker & Jill A. Fisher - 2020 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (4):305-331.
    In phase I clinical trials, healthy volunteers are dosed with investigational drugs and subjected to blood draws and other bodily monitoring procedures. In exchange, they are paid. Healthy volunteers are, in a very direct sense, selling access to their bodies for pharmaceutical companies and their associates to run drugs through. In his ethnographic study of socalled professional guinea pigs, Roberto Abadie writes, "Paid volunteers are well aware of the demand for an idealized, perfectly healthy volunteer. They also realize that their (...)
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  9.  3
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  10.  11
    Institutional Mistrust in the Organization of Pharmaceutical Clinical Trials.Jill A. Fisher - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (4):403-413.
    In this paper I explore the politics of trust in the clinical testing of pharmaceuticals in the US. Specifically, I analyze trust in terms of its institutional manifestations in the pharmaceutical clinical trials industry. In the process of testing new drugs, pharmaceutical companies must (1) protect their proprietary information from the clinicians who conduct their studies, and (2) find a way to ensure human subjects’ compliance to study protocols. Concern with these two critical issues leads drug companies to approach clinicians (...)
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  11.  18
    Companion Animal Studies: Slipping Through a Research Oversight Gap.Rebecca L. Walker & Jill A. Fisher - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (10):62-63.
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  12.  2
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  13.  1
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  14.  1
    Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
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  15.  26
    Tattooing the Body, Marking Culture.Jill A. Fisher - 2002 - Body and Society 8 (4):91-107.
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  16.  26
    Playing Patient, Playing Doctor: Munchausen Syndrome, Clinical S/M, and Ruptures of Medical Power. [REVIEW]Jill A. Fisher - 2006 - Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (3):135-149.
    This article deploys sadomasochism as a framework for understanding medical practice on an institutional level. By examining the case of the factitious illness Munchausen syndrome, this article analyzes the operations of power in the doctor-patient relationship through the trope of role-playing. Because Munchausen syndrome causes a disruption to the dyadic relationship between physicians and patients, a lens of sadomasochism highlights dynamics of power in medical practice that are often obscured in everyday practice. Specifically, this article illustrates how classification and diagnosis (...)
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  17.  18
    Investigating the Barons: Narrative and Nomenclature in Munchausen Syndrome.Jill A. Fisher - 2006 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 49 (2):250-262.
  18.  4
    Review of Donald W. Light and Antonio F. Maturo, Good Pharma: The Public-Health Model of the Mario Negri Institute1. [REVIEW]Jill A. Fisher - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):W9 - W10.
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