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  1.  19
    Towards an ethical theory in disaster situations.Pierre Mallia - 2015 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 18 (1):3-11.
    Health Care professionals working in disaster situations have to face urgent choices which diverge from their normal deontological ethos and are more utilitarian. Such is the triage system used to choose whom to treat. Instead of entering a crisis these professionals should be thought that ethics is not harmonizable to all situations and that there are situations in which saving as many lives as possible mean sacrificing others. This calls for defining a perimeter zone in which such choices occur, and (...)
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  2.  27
    Problems faced with legislating for IVF technology in a Roman Catholic Country.Pierre Mallia - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):77-87.
    Malta traditionally enjoys a Roman Catholic Society, with the official religion of the country being cited in the second article of the constitution. Recently the government proposed to legislate to regulate human reproductive technology, in particular In Vitro Fertilization, which has been practiced for over two decades without controlling legislation. A Parliamentary Committee for social affairs was set up to study the situation inviting most stakeholders. The arguments gravitated mostly on issues of the status of the embryo and the media (...)
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  3.  14
    The case of the Maltese Siamese Twins — when moral arguments balance out should parental rights come into play.Pierre Mallia - 2002 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (2):205-209.
  4.  28
    Can the Four Principles Help in Genetic Screening Decision-Making?Henk ten Have & Pierre Mallia - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (2):131-140.
    Although principles, as a framework to resolving moral dilemmas are still debated and seem to be in a philosophical quagmire, there are strong arguments that by specification one can resolve case-specific dilemmas in certain areas of bioethics. When it comes to genetic screening and testing however, the problem at the base is a moral disagreement on higher-order principles—such as the status of the embryo and parental issues. No amount of specification can resolve these issues without a dose of relativism. We (...)
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  5.  18
    Developments in IVF legislation in a Catholic Country.Pierre Mallia - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):385-390.
    Some time ago an article was published in this journal relating the difficulties of legislating for InVitro Fertilization in a Catholic country and the issues and side issues which had to be faced. Since then one has approached closer to having a law which regulates this technology. However several issues continue to challenge the country. The main concern, other than IVF not being a natural method of having children is the status of the embryo. The normative values of the country (...)
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  6.  18
    Is there a Mediterranean bioethics?Pierre Mallia - 2012 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 15 (4):419-429.
    Is there a special Mediterranean approach to Bioethics and if so what are the roots of this approach? And why not a Bosphorus, or a ‘lake Michigan’ bioethics? The answer to such a question depends on the focus one takes on defining ‘Mediterranean’? On the one hand one can refer to the Mediterranean region which includes the surrounding coasts, having Europe on its northern coast line, northern Africa on its southern coast line (and these will include the north and South (...)
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  7.  15
    Maltese Conjoined Twins.Pierre Mallia - 2001 - Hastings Center Report 31 (6):4.
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  8.  24
    Pragmatic approaches to genetic screening.Pierre Mallia & Henk ten Have - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):69-77.
    Pragmatic approaches to genetic testing are discussed and appraised. Whilst there are various schools of pragmatism, the Deweyan appraoch seems to be the most appreciated in bioethics as it allows a historical approach indebted to Hegel. This in turn allows the pragmatist to specify and balance principles in various contexts. There are problems with where to draw a line between what is referred to here as the micro- and macro-level of doing bioethics, unless one is simply to be classified as (...)
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  9.  67
    From what should we protect future generations: Germ-line therapy or genetic screening?Pierre Mallia & Henk ten Have - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):17-24.
    This paper discusses the issue of whether we have responsibilities to future generations with respect to genetic screening, including for purposes of selective abortion or discard. Future generations have been discussed at length among scholars. The concept of ‘Guardianfor Future Generations’ is tackled and its main criticisms discussed. Whilst germ-line cures, it is argued, can only affect family trees, genetic screening and testing can have wider implications. If asking how this may affect future generations is a legitimate question and since (...)
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