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  1. Beverley Clack (2014). 'Beginning Something New': Control, Spontaneity and the Dancing Philosopher. Sophia 53 (2):261-273.
    This paper suggests ways in which a philosophy modelled as dance provides the means of challenging political structures that emphasise control and constraint at the expense of spontaneity and creativity. Through combining Arendt’s claim that spontaneity is the quintessential human quality with Nietzsche’s modelling of philosophy as disruptive dancing, the possibilities of modelling philosophy as dance are explored. Envisaging philosophical practice in this way provides a corrective to the prioritising of certainty in philosophical method, thus enabling further reflection on what (...)
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  2. Beverley Clack & Brian R. Clack (2014). Philosophy of Religion: A Critical Introduction. Polity.
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  3. Beverley Clack (2012). Being Human: Religion and Superstition in a Psychoanalytic Philosophy of Religion. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:255-279.
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  4. Beverley Clack (2008). The Philosophy of Religion: A Critical Introduction. Polity Press.
    This new edition of The Philosophy of Religion will continue to be essential reading for all students and practitioners of the subject.
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  5. Beverley Clack (2007). After Freud: Phantasy and Imagination in the Philosophy of Religion. Philosophy Compass 3 (1):203-221.
    Philosophers of religion have tended to focus on Freud’s dismissal of religion as an illusion, thus characterising his account as primarily hostile. Those who wish to engage with psychoanalytic ideas in order to understand religion in a more positive way have tended to look to later psychoanalysts for more sympathetic sources. This paper suggests that other aspects of Freud’s own writings might, surprisingly, provide such tools. In particular, a more subtle understanding of the relationship between illusion and reality emerges in (...)
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  6. Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.) (2004). Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.
    Feminist philosophy of religion as a subject of study has developed in recent years because of the identification and exposure of explicit sexism in much of the traditional philosophical thinking about religion. This struggle with a discipline shaped almost exclusively by men has led feminist philosophers to redress the problematic biases of gender, race, class and sexual orientation of the subject. Anderson and Clack bring together new and key writings on the core topics and approaches to this growing field. Each (...)
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  7. Beverley Clack (2002). Sex and Death: A Reappraisal of Human Mortality. Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction 1 -- 1. Transcending Mortality: Plato's Philosophy and Augustine's Theology 10 -- 2. Transcending the Void: Sex and Death in Sartre and Beauvoir's Existentialism 39 -- 3. Eros, Thanatos and the Human .Self: Sigmund Freud 60 -- 4. Sex and Death in a Meaningless Universe: The Marquis de Sade 80 -- 5. Living in Accordance with Nature: Seneca 104 -- Conclusion Sex, Death, and the Meaningful Life 126.
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  8. Beverley Clack (1999). A Tradition of Misogyny. The Philosophers' Magazine 7 (7):47-48.
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  9. Beverley Clack (ed.) (1999). Misogyny in the Western Philosophical Tradition: A Reader. Routledge.
    From some of the great philosophers of the Western tradition: "The Devils gateway" --Tertullian "A misbegotten male" --Aquinas "Big children their whole life long" --Schopenhauer The roots of philosophical misogyny in the writings of thinkers from the ancient Greeks through the modern age are exposed and explored in this collection. Beverley Clack questions whether the wisdom of these philosophers can be separated from the misogyny, and whether feminists should seek an alternative to the Western philosophical canon. This collection offers chronological (...)
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  10. Beverley Clack (1991). J. Kellenberger. God-Relationships With and Without God. Pp. 176. (Basing Stoke: Macmillan.) £35.00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 27 (2):281.
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