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Feminist Aesthetics
  1. Richard Allen (1995). Projecting Illusion: Film Spectatorship and the Impression of Reality. Cambridge University Press.
    Projecting Illusion offers a systematic analysis of the impression of reality in the cinema and the pleasure it gives to the film spectator. Film provides a compelling experience that can be considered as a form of illusion akin to the experience of day-dream and dream. Examining the concept of illusion and its relationship to fantasy in the experience of visual representation, Richard Allen situates his explanation within the context of an analytical criticism of contemporary film and critical theory. He argues (...)
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  2. Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) (2006). Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder. Arcibel Editores.
  3. Ismay Barwell (1990). Feminine Perspectives and Narrative Points of View. Hypatia 5 (2):63 - 75.
    The search for a unified and coherent feminine aesthetic theory could not be successful because it relies upon "universals" which do not exist and assumes simple parallels among psychological, social and aesthetic structures. However, with an apparatus of narrative points of view, one can demonstrate that individual narrative texts are organized from a feminine point of view. To this extent, the intuition that there is a feminine aesthetic can be vindicated.
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  4. Karen-Edis Barzman (1994). Beyond the Canon: Feminists, Postmodernism, and the History of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (3):327-339.
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  5. Christine Battersby (1989/1990). Gender and Genius: Towards a Feminist Aesthetics. Indiana University Press.
  6. Merrie Bergmann (1986). How Many Feminists Does It Take to Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong with It. Hypatia 1 (1):63 - 82.
    In this paper I am concerned with two questions: What is sexist humor? and what is wrong with it? To answer the first question, I briefly develop a theory of humor and then characterize sexist humor as humor in which sexist beliefs (attitudes/norms) are presupposed and are necessary to the fun. Concerning the second question, I criticize a common sort of argument that is supposed to explain why sexist humor is offensive: although the argument explains why sexist humor feels offensive, (...)
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  7. Rosemary Betterton (2006). Promising Monsters: Pregnant Bodies, Artistic Subjectivity, and Maternal Imagination. Hypatia 21 (1):80-100.
    : This paper engages with theories of the monstrous maternal in feminist philosophy to explore how examples of visual art practice by Susan Hiller, Marc Quinn, Alison Lapper, Tracey Emin, and Cindy Sherman disrupt maternal ideals in visual culture through differently imagined body schema. By examining instances of the pregnant body represented in relation to maternal subjectivity, disability, abortion, and "prosthetic" pregnancy, it asks whether the "monstrous" can offer different kinds of figurations of the maternal that acknowledge the agency and (...)
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  8. Carol Bigwood (1993). Earth Muse: Feminism, Nature, and Art. Temple University Press.
  9. Barbara Bolt (2000). Shedding Light for the Matter. Hypatia 15 (2):202-216.
    : This paper critiques enlightenment notions of representation and rehearses an alternative model of mapping that is grounded in performance. Working from her own practice as a landscape painter, Bolt argues that the particular experience of the "glare" of Australian light fractures the nexus between light, form, knowledge, and subjectivity. This rupture prompts a move from shedding light ON the matter to shedding light FOR the matter and suggests an emergent rather than a representational practice.
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  10. L. Ryan Musgrave Bonomo (2010). Addams's Philosophy of Art : Feminist Aesthetics and Moral Imagination at Hull House. In Maurice Hamington (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  11. Peg Brand (2007). Feminism and Aesthetics. In Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.), The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
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  12. Peg Brand (2006). Feminist Art Epistemologies: Understanding Feminist Art. Hypatia 21 (3):166 - 189.
    Feminist art epistemologies (FAEs) greatly aid the understanding of feminist art, particularly when they serve to illuminate the hidden meanings of an artist's intent. The success of parodic imagery produced by feminist artists (feminist visual parodies, FVPs) necessarily depends upon a viewer's recognition of the original work of art created by a male artist and the realization of the parodist's intent to ridicule and satirize. As Brand shows in this essay, such recognition and realization constitute the knowledge of a well-(in)formed (...)
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  13. Peg Zeglin Brand (1999). Glaring Omissions in Traditional Theories of Art. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:177-186.
    I investigate the role of feminist theorizing in relation to traditionally-based aesthetics. Feminist artworks have arisen within the context of a patriarchal Artworld dominated for thousands of years by male artists, critics, theorists, and philosophers. I look at the history of that context as it impacts philosophical theorizing by pinpointing the narrow range of the paradigms used in defining “art.” I test the plausibility of Danto’s After the End of Art vision of a post-historical, pluralistic future in which “anything goes,” (...)
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  14. Peggy Zeglin Brand (2006). Feminist Art Epistemologies: Understanding Feminist Art. Hypatia 21 (3):166-189.
    : Feminist art epistemologies (FAEs) greatly aid the understanding of feminist art, particularly when they serve to illuminate the hidden meanings of an artist's intent. The success of parodic imagery produced by feminist artists (feminist visual parodies, FVPs) necessarily depends upon a viewer's recognition of the original work of art created by a male artist and the realization of the parodist's intent to ridicule and satirize. As Brand shows in this essay, such recognition and realization constitute the knowledge of a (...)
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  15. Peggy Zeglin Brand & Mary Devereaux (2003). Introduction: Feminism and Aesthetics. Hypatia 18 (4).
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  16. Somer Brodribb (1992). Nothing Mat(T)Ers: A Feminist Critique of Postmodernism. Spinifex Press.
    "An eloquent work. Somer Brodribb not only gives us a feminist critique of postmodernism with its masculinist predeterminants in existentialism, its Freudian footholdings and its Sadean values, but in the very form and texture of the critique, she literally creates new discourse in feminist theory. Brodribb has transcended not only postmodernism but its requirement that we speak in its voice even when criticizing it. She creates a language that is at once poetic and powerfully analytical. Her insistent and compelling radical (...)
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  17. Curtis Brown (2002). Art, Oppression, and the Autonomy of Aesthetics. In Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (eds.), Arguing about Art, Second Edition. Routledge.
    Mary Devereaux has suggested, in an overview of feminist aesthetics[1], that feminist aesthetics constitutes a revolutionary approach to the field: "aesthetics cannot simply 'add on' feminist theories as it might add new works by [<span class='Hi'>Nelson</span>] Goodman, Arthur Danto or George Dickie. To take feminism seriously involves rethinking our basic concepts and recasting the history of the discipline." In particular, feminist theory involves a rejection of "deeply entrenched assumptions about the universal value of art and aesthetic experience." Overthrowing these assumptions (...)
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  18. Ann J. Cahill (2003). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia 18 (4):42-64.
    : This paper explores the conditions under which feminine beautification constitutes a feminist practice. Distinguishing between the process and product of beautification allows us to isolate those aesthetic, inter-subjective, and embodied elements that empower rather than disempower women. The empowering characteristics of beautification, however, are difficult and perhaps impossible to represent in a sexist context; therefore, while beautifying may be a positive experience for women, being viewed as a beautified object in current Western society is almost always opposed to women's (...)
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  19. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning In. Hypatia 21 (3).
    : This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus (...)
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  20. Tina Chanter (2006). Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca. Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
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  21. F. Collin (2010). Between Poiesis and Praxis: Women and Art. Diogenes 57 (1):83-92.
    If we think of artistic creation as a basic dimension of humanity we need to question the absence of female artists in history. We should also look at their gradual emergence in the late 20th century, an emergence that coincides with the feminist movement and a change in the conception of art itself, revealed chiefly by Duchamp. But does art by women have some specificity? Without giving a definite answer as far as subject matter is concerned, we note that the (...)
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  22. Paula M. Cooey (1994). Religious Imagination and the Body: A Feminist Analysis. Oxford University Press.
    In recent years feminist scholarship has increasingly focused on the importance of the body and its representations in virtually every social, cultural, and intellectual context. Many have argued that because women are more closely identified with their bodies, they have access to privileged and different kinds of knowledge than men. In this landmark new book, Paula Cooey offers a different perspective on the significance of the body in the context of religious life and practice. Building on the pathbreaking work of (...)
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  23. Renée Cox (1990). A Gynecentric Aesthetic. Hypatia 5 (2):43 - 62.
    In the proposed gynecentric aesthetic, which follows the work of Heide Göttner-Abendroth and Alan Lomax, aesthetic activity would function to integrate the individual and society. Intellect, emotion and action would combine to achieve a synthesis of body and spirit. Song and dance would involve the equal expressions of all participants, and aesthetic structures would reflect this egalitarianism. The erotic would be expressed as a vital, positive force, divorced from repression and pornography. The emphasis would be off aesthetic objects to be (...)
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  24. Jean Curthoys (1997). Feminist Amnesia: The Wake of Women's Liberation. Routledge.
    Feminist Amnesia is an important challenge to contemporary academic feminism. Jean Curthoys argues that the intellectual decline of university arts education and the loss of a deep moral commitment in feminism are related phenomena. The contradiction set up by the radical ideas of the 1960s, and institutionalised life of many of its protagonists in the academy, has produced a special kind of intellectual distortion. This book criticizes current trends in feminist theory from the perspective of forgotten and allegedly outdated feminist (...)
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  25. Kathleen Kadon Desmond (2011). Ideas About Art. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements. -- List of Illustrations. -- Preface. -- 1. Public Opinion/Public Art. -- 2. Non-Western Ideas. -- 3. Western Ideas. -- 4. Beauty. -- 5. Expression & Aesthetic Experience. -- 6. Art & Ethics. -- 7. Political Art, Censorship & Pornography. -- 8. Art & Economics. -- 9. Feminist Art, Aesthetics & Art Criticism. -- 10. Postmodern Art & Attitudes. -- 11. Photography & New Media. -- 12. (Re)Discovering Design. -- 13. Art & Aesthetic Education. -- (...)
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  26. Claire Detels (1994). Autonomist/Formalist Aesthetics, Music Theory, and the Feminist Paradigm of Soft Boundaries. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 52 (1):113-126.
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  27. Elizabeth Ann Dobie (1990). Interweaving Feminist Frameworks. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):381-394.
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  28. Jane Duran (2009). Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic. Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 88-95.
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  29. A. W. Eaton (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Art. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):873-893.
    This article outlines the issues addressed by feminist philosophy of art, critically surveys major developments in the field, and concludes by considering directions in which the field is moving.
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  30. A. W. Eaton (2003). Where Ethics and Aesthetics Meet: Titian's Rape of Europa. Hypatia 18 (4):159 - 188.
    Titian's Rape of Europa is highly praised for its luminous colors and sensual textures. But the painting has an overlooked dark side, namely that it eroticizes rape. I argue that this is an ethical defect that diminishes the painting aesthetically. This argument-that an artwork can be worse off qua work of art precisely because it is somehow ethically problematic-demonstrates that feminist concerns about art can play a legitimate role in art criticism and aesthetic appreciation.
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  31. Farhang Erfani (2011). Iranian Cinema and Philosophy: Shooting Truth. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- How orphans believe: Deleuze, national cinema and Majidi's The color of paradise. Deleuze: on realism and movement-Image -- Deleuze: neorealism (and a brief analysis of Kiarostami's life and nothing more) -- Majidi: The color of paradise -- Deleuze and Majidi: the faith of Mohammad -- "What are filmmakers for in needy times?" On Heidegger and Kiarostami's Taste of cherry -- An overview of Kiarostami's Taste of cherry and the question of the medium -- Heidegger on art and truth (...)
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  32. Betsy Ettorre (forthcoming). Feminist Pleasure and Feminine Beautification. Hypatia.
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  33. Marilyn French (1990). Is There a Feminist Aesthetic? Hypatia 5 (2):33 - 42.
    Literary art that is identifiably feminist approaches reality from a feminist perspective and endorses female experience. A feminist perspective demystifies patriarchal assumptions about the nature of human beings, their relation to nature, and the relation of physical and moral qualities to each other. To endorse female experience, the artist must defy or stretch traditional literary conventions, which often means offending or alienating readers. Traditional literary conventions are rooted in philosophical assumptions several thousand years old and still widely current. A third (...)
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  34. Joanna Frueh (2003). Vaginal Aesthetics. Hypatia 18 (4):137-158.
    : Based on the premise that ugliness looms large in both cultural and women's consciousness of vaginas, I create a representation of the vagina's beauty as rich and sweet. Smell, taste, and touch play predominant roles as I use scholarly analysis and my own autobiographical narratives and poems and poetic language in order to redress the vagina's culturally inherited ugliness.
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  35. Mike Gane (2000). Jean Baudrillard: In Radical Uncertainty. Pluto Press.
    Presents Baudrillard’s key concepts and examines his contribution to the analysis of specific domains, such as postmodernism, feminism, technology, art, war, ...
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  36. Mary D. Garrard (2010). Brunelleschi's Egg: Nature, Art, and Gender in Renaissance Italy. University of California Press.
    Introduction -- Great Mother Nature -- The gendering of nature as female : from prehistory through the Middle Ages -- Nature and art in the Quattrocento : from pupil to equal -- Technology and the mastery of physical nature : Brunelleschi and Alberti -- Genesis and the reproduction of life : Masaccio and Michelangelo -- The rebirth of Venus and the feminization of beauty : Botticelli -- A balance of power : pictorial metaphors for nature in transition -- Nature's special (...)
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  37. Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2001). The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
    The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics is an indispensable guide and reference source to the major thinkers and topics in aesthetics. Forty-six new entries by a team of renowned international contributors provide clear and up-to-date entries under four headings: historical, from Plato to Derrida; aesthetic theory, from definitions of art to pictorial representation; issues and challenges, from criticism to feminist aesthetics; and the individual arts, from literature to theatre.
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  38. Elizabeth Gould (2011). Feminist Imperative(s) in Music and Education: Philosophy, Theory, or What Matters Most. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):130-147.
    A historically feminized profession, education in North America remains remarkably unaffected by feminism, with the notable exception of pedagogy and its impact on curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe characteristics of feminism that render it particularly useful and appropriate for developing potentialities in education and music education. As a set of flexible methodological tools informed by Gilles Deleuze's notions of philosophy and art, I argue feminism may contribute to education's becoming more efficacious, reflexive, and reflective of the (...)
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  39. Timothy Gould (1990). Intensity and its Audiences: Notes Towards a Feminist Perspective on the Kantian Sublime. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):305-315.
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  40. E. A. Grosz (2011). Becoming Undone: Darwinian Reflections on Life, Politics, and Art. Duke University Press.
    The inhuman in the humanities : Darwin and the ends of man -- Deleuze, Bergson, and the concept of life -- Bergson, Deleuze, and difference -- Feminism, materialism, and freedom -- The future of feminist theory : dreams for new knowledges -- Differences disturbing identity : Deleuze and feminism -- Irigaray and the ontology of sexual difference -- Darwin and the split between natural and sexual selection -- Sexual difference as sexual selection : Irigarayan reflections on Darwin -- Art and (...)
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  41. E. A. Grosz (1995). Space, Time, and Perversion: Essays on the Politics of Bodies. Routledge.
    Marking a ground-breaking moment in the debate surrounding bodies and "body politics," Elizabeth Grosz's Space, Time and Perversion contends that only by resituating and rethinking the body will feminism and cultural analysis effect and unsettle the knowledges, disciplines and institutions which have controlled, regulated and managed the body both ideologically and materially. Exploring the fields of architecture, philosophy, and--in a controversial way--queer theory, Grosz shows how these fields have conceptually stripped bodies of their specificity, their corporeality, and the vestigal traces (...)
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  42. Julian Daniel Gutierrez-Albilla (2008). Abjection and the Politics of Feminist and Queer Subjectivities in Contemporary Art. Angelaki 13 (1):65-84.
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  43. Maurice Hamington (ed.) (2010). Feminist Interpretations of Jane Addams. Pennsylvania State University Press.
    "A collection of articles that address Jane Addams (1860-1935) in terms of her contribution to feminist philosophy and theory through her work on culture, art, ...
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  44. Karen Hanson (1990). Dressing Down Dressing Up -- The Philosophic Fear of Fashion. Hypatia 5 (2):107 - 121.
    There is, to all appearances, a philosophic hostility to fashionable dress. Studying this contempt, this paper examines likely sources in philosophy's suspicion of change; anxiety about surfaces and the inessential; failures in the face of death; and the philosophic disdain for, denial of, the human body and human passivity. If there are feminist concerns about fashion, they should be radically different from those of traditional philosophy. Whatever our ineluctable worries about desire and death, whatever our appropriate anger and impatience with (...)
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  45. Leo Havemann (2001). Maggie Humm, Feminism and Film (1997). American Journal of Semiotics 17 (3):277-279.
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  46. Eleanor Heartney (2003). Thinking Through the Body: Women Artists and the Catholic Imagination. Hypatia 18 (4):3-22.
    : Mariology—the veneration of the Virgin Mary—exerts a profound influence on women artists from Catholic backgrounds. Internalizing the mixed signals Mary transmits about purity, female strength, and compassion, they reinterpret the stories and mythologies surrounding her in ways that allow them to explore the ambiguities of the female role in contemporary society while also examining their conflicts about their own sexuality.
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  47. Hilde Hein (1998). Why Not Feminist Aesthetic Theory? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 12 (1):20 - 34.
  48. Hilde Hein (1990). The Role of Feminist Aesthetics in Feminist Theory. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):281-291.
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  49. Lisa Heldke (2003). Book Review: Elspeth Probyn. Carnal Appetites: Foodsexidentities. London and New York: Routledge, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):240-242.
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  50. Lisa Heldke (1988). Recipes for Theory Making. Hypatia 3 (2):15 - 29.
    This is a paper about philosophical inquiry and cooking. In it, I suggest that thinking about cooking can illuminate our understanding of other forms of inquiry. Specifically, I think it provides us with one way to circumvent the dilemma of absolutism and relativism. The paper is divided into two sections. In the first, I sketch the background against which my project is situated. In the second, I develop an account of cooking as inquiry, by exploring five aspects of recipe creation (...)
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