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John Capps [23]John M. Capps [3]John Michael Capps [1]
  1.  72
    John Capps (2000). Naturalism, Pragmatism, and Design. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 14 (3):161-178.
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  2.  36
    John M. Capps (2009). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Preface -- The importance of critical thinking -- Fallacies of relevance -- Fallacies of evidence -- Fallacies of assumption -- Thinking together.
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  3.  22
    John Capps (2004). McCarthyism and American Philosophy. Philosophy Now 46:14-17.
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  4.  11
    John M. Capps (2006). How the Cold War Transformed Philosophy of Science. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):167-171.
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  5.  26
    John Capps (2008). The Dynamic Individualism of William James (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 550-555.
  6.  17
    John Capps (2006). Review: George Reisch. How the Cold War Transformed Philosophy of Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):167-171.
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  7.  6
    John Capps (1999). The Pragmatism of Frederick L. Will. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 35 (3):475 - 499.
    In his later years Frederick Will took a pragmatic approach to the justification of beliefs and norms. Here I trace the development of his pragmatism through his early ordinary language philosophy and subsequent antifoundationalism. I then compare his pragmatic naturalism with Dewey's instrumentalism: while both are pragmatists of the center (not so left-leaning as Rorty and James, for example), Will's realism places him to the right of Dewey. While Will's refreshingly aware that justification is a complex affair, I conclude that (...)
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  8.  6
    John Capps (2013). Preludes to Pragmatism: Toward a Reconstruction of Philosophy By Philip Kitcher. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 49 (3):443-447.
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  9.  2
    John Capps (2004). Review of Larry Hickman, Philosophical Tools for Technological Culture. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism 1 (1):184-187.
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  10. John Capps (2002). Achieving Pluralism (Why Aids Activists Are Different From Creationists). In F. Thomas Burke, D. Micah Hester & Robert B. Talisse (eds.), Dewey's Logical Theory: New Studies and Interpretations. Vanderbilt University Press 239--261.
  11. John Capps (2013). Huw Price. Expressivism, Pragmatism and Representationalism. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2013. 214 Pp. Cloth ISBN 978-1-107-00984-4. Paper ISBN 978-0-521-27906-2. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (2):193-200.
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  12. Donald Capps & John Capps (eds.) (2004). James and Dewey on Belief and Experience. University of Illinois Press.
     
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  13. Donald Capps & John M. Capps (eds.) (2004). James and Dewey on Belief and Experience. University of Illinois Press.
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  14. John Capps (2004). Larry Hickman, Philosophical Tools for Technological Culture. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2001. Pp. Xi + 215. ISBN 0-253-33869-7. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism 1 (1):184-187.
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  15. John Capps & Donald Capps (2011). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think_ is a thoughtful and accessible analysis of the ways in which jokes illustrate how we think critically, and how the thinking process goes awry in everyday human situations Uses jokes to illustrate the various mistakes or fallacies that are typically identified and discussed in courses on critical reasoning Provides an effective way to learn critical thinking skills since jokes often describe real-life situations where it really matters whether a person (...)
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  16. John Capps & Donald Capps (2011). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think_ is a thoughtful and accessible analysis of the ways in which jokes illustrate how we think critically, and how the thinking process goes awry in everyday human situations Uses jokes to illustrate the various mistakes or fallacies that are typically identified and discussed in courses on critical reasoning Provides an effective way to learn critical thinking skills since jokes often describe real-life situations where it really matters whether a person (...)
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  17. John Capps & Donald Capps (2009). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think_ is a thoughtful and accessible analysis of the ways in which jokes illustrate how we think critically, and how the thinking process goes awry in everyday human situations Uses jokes to illustrate the various mistakes or fallacies that are typically identified and discussed in courses on critical reasoning Provides an effective way to learn critical thinking skills since jokes often describe real-life situations where it really matters whether a person (...)
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  18. John Capps & Donald Capps (2009). You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think. Wiley-Blackwell.
    _You've Got to Be Kidding!: How Jokes Can Help You Think_ is a thoughtful and accessible analysis of the ways in which jokes illustrate how we think critically, and how the thinking process goes awry in everyday human situations Uses jokes to illustrate the various mistakes or fallacies that are typically identified and discussed in courses on critical reasoning Provides an effective way to learn critical thinking skills since jokes often describe real-life situations where it really matters whether a person (...)
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  19. David Hildebrand, Kimberly Bilica & John Capps (2008). Addressing Controversies in Science Education: A Pragmatic Approach to Evolution Education. Science and Education 17 (8-9):1033-1052.
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