5 found
Sort by:
  1. Jon Parkin (forthcoming). Thomas Hobbes and the Problem of Self-Censorship. History of European Ideas.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jon Parkin (2013). Baiting the Bear: The Anglicant Attack on Hobbes in the Later 1660s. History of Political Thought 34 (3):421-458.
    During the later 1660s Thomas Hobbes clearly believed that he was being targeted by dangerous enemies but to date little evidence has been brought to substantiate Hobbes's claims. This article considers evidence suggesting that Hobbes was in fact in danger from clerical and lay enemies who regarded the elderly thinker as a dangerous ideological threat to church and state. What they did, and how Hobbes responded to their actions, helps us to understand the philosopher's place in the politics of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jon Parkin (2010). Hobbes. In S. J. Savonius-Wroth Paul Schuurman & Jonathen Walmsley (eds.), The Continuum Companion to Locke. Continuum. 61--5.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jon Parkin (2007). Taming the Leviathan: The Reception of the Political and Religious Ideas of Thomas Hobbes in England, 1640-1700. Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Hobbes is widely acknowledged to be the most important political philosopher to have written in English. Taming the Leviathan is a wide-ranging study of the English reception of Hobbes’s political and religious ideas. In the first book-length treatment of the topic for over forty years, Jon Parkin follows the fate of Hobbes’s texts (particularly Leviathan) and the development of his controversial reputation during the seventeenth century, revealing the stakes in the critical discussion of the philosopher and his ideas. Revising (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jon Parkin (1999). Science, Religion, and Politics in Restoration England: Richard Cumberland's De Legibus Naturae. Royal Historical Society/Boydell Press.
    A new perspective on the interaction of science, religion and politics in Restoration England, based on discussion of Cumberland's De legibus naturae.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation