10 found
Sort by:
Disambiguations:
Lawrence McCrea [8]Lawrence J. Mccrea [2]
  1. Lawrence McCrea (forthcoming). Appayyadīkṣita's Invention of Śrīkaṇṭha's Vedānta. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-14.
    Apart from his voluminous, immensely learned, and spectacularly successful contributions to the fields of Hermeneutics (Mīmāṃsā), non-dualist Metaphysics (Advaita Vedānta), and poetics, the sixteenth century South Indian polymath Appayyadīkṣita is famed for reviving from obscurity the moribund Śaivite Vedānta tradition represented by the (thirteenth century?) Brahmasūtrabhāṣya of Śrīkaṇṭha. Appayya’s voluminous commentary on this work, his Śivārkamaṇidīpikā, not only reconstitutes Śrīkaṇṭha’s system, but radically transforms it, making it into a springboard for Appayya’s own highly original critiques of standard views of Mīmāṃsā (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Lawrence McCrea (forthcoming). Mahimabhaṭṭa's Analysis of Poetic Flaws. Journal of the American Oriental Society.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Lawrence McCrea (2010). Poetry Beyond Good and Evil: Bilhaṇa and the Tradition of Patron-Centered Court Epic. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):503-518.
    The eleventh century poet Bilhaṇa’s magnum opus, his Vikramāṅkadevacarita, quickly became one of the most admired and quoted examplars of a newly emergent genre in second millennium Sanskrit poetry, the patron-centered court epic—an extended verse composition dedicated to relating the deeds and celebrating the virtues of the pet’s own patron. But Bilhaṇa’s verse biography of his patron, the Cālukya monarch Vikramāditya VI, while ostensibly singing his praises, is colored throughout by darker suggestions that Vikramāditya may be less than the moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Lawrence J. McCrea (2010). Buddhist Philosophy of Language in India: Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion. Columbia University Press.
    This volume marks the first English translation of Jnanasrimitra's Monograph on Exclusion, a careful, critical investigation into language, perception, and conceptual awareness.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Lawrence McCrea, Yigal Bronner & Whitney Cox (2010). Introduction. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (5):453-455.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lawrence McCrea (2008). Playing with the System: Fragmentation and Individualization in Late Pre-Colonial Mīmāṃsā. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (5-6):575-585.
    Studies of Indian philosophy have generally overemphasized the con-sistency of philosophical systems over time, and consequently slighted later works as derivative. This paper seeks to reassess the “system” as a basic category for analyzing Sanskrit philosophy, in particular by examining the changes that took place in hermeneutics, or Mīmāṃsā, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when it became commonplace for Mīmāṃsā authors to criticize long established Mīmāṃsā positions. At first this criticism is selective and largely directed at more recent authors, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lawrence J. Mccrea & Parimal G. Patil (2006). Traditionalism and Innovation: Philosophy, Exegesis, and Intellectual History in Jñānaśrīmitra's Apohaprakara A. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (4):303-366.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Lawrence McCrea (2002). Novelty of Form and Novelty of Substance in Seventeenth Century Mīmāmsā. Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (5):481-494.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Yigal Bronner & Lawrence McCrea (2001). The Poetics of Distortive Talk Plot and Character in Ratnākara's ``Fifty Verbal Pervesions (Vakroktipañcāśikā). Journal of Indian Philosophy 29 (4):435-464.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lawrence McCrea (2000). The Hierarchical Organization of Language in Mīmāmsā Interpretive Theory. Journal of Indian Philosophy 28 (5/6):429-459.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation