Search results for 'Loretta Kensinger' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Loretta Kensinger (1997). (In)Quest of Liberal Feminism. Hypatia 12 (4):178 - 197.score: 240.0
    I am interested in exploring the usefulness and limits of traditional categories of feminist theory, such as those laid out by Alison Jaggar (1977; 1983). I begin the analysis by critically comparing various treatments of liberal feminism. I focus throughout this investigation on uncovering ways that current frameworks privilege white authors and concerns, recreate the split between theory and activism, and obscure long histories of theoretical and practical coalition and alliance work.
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  2. Penny A. Weiss & Loretta Kensinger (eds.) (2007). Feminist Interpretations of Emma Goldman. Penn State University Press.score: 240.0
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  3. Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2009). What Factors Need to Be Considered to Understand Emotional Memories? Emotion Review 1 (2):120-121.score: 60.0
    In my original review (Kensinger, 2009), I proposed that to understand the effects of emotion on memory accuracy, we must look beyond effects of arousal and consider the contribution of valence. In discussing this proposal, the commentators raise a number of excellent points that hone in on the question of when valence does (and does not) account for emotion's effects on memory accuracy. Though future research will be required to resolve this issue more fully, in this brief response, I (...)
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  4. [deleted]Eric S. Allard & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2014). Age-Related Differences in Neural Recruitment During the Use of Cognitive Reappraisal and Selective Attention as Emotion Regulation Strategies. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 30.0
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  5. Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2009). Remembering the Details: Effects of Emotion. Emotion Review 1 (2):99-113.score: 30.0
    Though emotion conveys memory benefits, it does not enhance memory equally for all aspects of an experience, nor for all types of emotional events. In this review, I outline the behavioral evidence for arousal's focal enhancements of memory and describe the neural processes that may support those focal enhancements. I also present behavioral evidence to suggest that these focal enhancements occur more often for negative experiences than for positive ones. This result appears to arise because of valence-dependent effects on the (...)
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  6. Daniel L. Schacter, Angela H. Gutchess & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2009). Specificity of Memory: Implications for Individual and Collective Remembering. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge. 83--111.score: 30.0
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  7. Jill D. Waring, Jessica D. Payne, Daniel L. Schacter & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2010). Impact of Individual Differences Upon Emotion-Induced Memory Trade-Offs. Cognition and Emotion 24 (1):150-167.score: 30.0
  8. Elizabeth A. Kensinger & Suzanne Corkin (2002). Alzheimer Disease. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.score: 30.0
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  9. E. A. Kensinger & S. Corkin (2003). Neural Changes in Aging. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group. 70--78.score: 30.0
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  10. Katherine R. Mickley Steinmetz, Jill D. Waring & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2014). The Effect of Divided Attention on Emotion-Induced Memory Narrowing. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):881-892.score: 30.0
  11. Katherine Schmidt, Pooja Patnaik & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2011). Emotion's Influence on Memory for Spatial and Temporal Context. Cognition and Emotion 25 (2):229-243.score: 30.0
  12. Allie Steinberger, Jessica D. Payne & Elizabeth A. Kensinger (2011). The Effect of Cognitive Reappraisal on the Emotional Memory Trade-Off. Cognition and Emotion 25 (7):1237-1245.score: 30.0
  13. N. Timothy, Charles R. Plott, A. U. Zarazaga, E. Carlos, Increase Suburban Income Growth, Russell W. Cooper, Third Federal Reserve District A. U. Mester, J. Loretta, Bank Closure A. U. Mailath & J. George (1993). Caltech Social Science Working Paper. Inquiry 1994:10.score: 30.0
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  14. Stephanie A. Nixon & Nkosinathi Ngcobo (2007). Review of 'Ethics and AIDS in Africa: The Challenge to Our Thinking' by Anton A. Van Niekerk and Loretta M. Kopelman (Eds). [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):1.score: 18.0
    Book Review of 'Ethics and AIDS in Africa: The Challenge to Our Thinking' By Anton A. van Niekerk and Loretta M. Kopelman (Eds).
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  15. Mary Ann Gardell Cutter (1996). Ambiguities and Irresolvable Tensions in the Ada: A Reply to Loretta M. Kopelman and Anita Silvers. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (2):225-235.score: 18.0
    This essay comments on the articles by Loretta M. Kopelman and Anita Silvers. It extends their analyses and concludes that consistency and the total absence of conflict may be unavailable when one interprets and applies the Americans with Disabilities Act.
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  16. M. A. Gardell Cutter (1996). Ambiguities and Irresolvable Tensions in the ADA: A Reply to Loretta M. Kopelman and Anita Silvers. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (2):225-235.score: 18.0
    This essay comments on the articles by Loretta M. Kopelman and Anita Silvers. It extends their analyses and concludes that consistency and the total absence of conflict may be unavailable when one interprets and applies the Americans with Disabilities Act.
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  17. Sarah Lucia Hoagland (2007). Review Essay: Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, Edited by Jael Silliman, Marlene Gerber Fried, Loretta Ross, and Elena R. Guti�Rrez; Policing the National Body: Race, Gender and Criminalization, Edited by Jael Silliman and Anannya Bhattacharjee; and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide, by Andrea Smith. Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.score: 15.0
  18. G. R. McLean (2007). Ethics & AIDS in Africa: The Challenge to Our Thinking – Edited by Anton A. Van Niekerk and Loretta M. Kopelman. Developing World Bioethics 7 (3):157–162.score: 15.0
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  19. S. Holm (2001). Building Bioethics-Conversations with Clouser and Friends on Medical Ethics: Edited by Loretta M Kopelman, Dordrecht, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999, 250 Pages, Pound72.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (3):206-206.score: 15.0
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  20. Marcia Eveleigh, John C. Syler & Stephen F. Davis (1991). Loretta McGregor. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (4-6):320-322.score: 15.0
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  21. Dirk Hagemeister (2006). Anton A. Van Niekerk, Loretta M. Kopelman (Eds) (2005) Ethics & Aids in Africa—The Challenge to Our Thinking. Ethik in der Medizin 18 (3):280-282.score: 15.0
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  22. I. Homage (1993). Loretta J. Ross. In Stanlie M. James & Abena P. A. Busia (eds.), Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women. Routledge. 143.score: 15.0
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  23. Loretta M. Kopelman & Anton A. van Niekerk (2002). AIDS and Africa. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (2):139 – 142.score: 6.0
    Sub-Saharan Africa is the epicenter of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and in this issue of the Journal, seven authors discuss the moral, social and medical implications of having 70% of those stricken living in this area. Anton A. van Niekerk considers complexities of plague in this region (poverty, denial, poor leadership, illiteracy, women's vulnerability, and disenchantment of intimacy) and the importance of finding responses that empower its people. Solomon Benatar reinforces these issues, but also discusses the role of global politics in (...)
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  24. Loretta M. Kopelman (2007). Using the Best Interests Standard to Decide Whether to Test Children for Untreatable, Late-Onset Genetic Diseases. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (4):375 – 394.score: 3.0
    A new analysis of the Best Interests Standard is given and applied to the controversy about testing children for untreatable, severe late-onset genetic diseases, such as Huntington's disease or Alzheimer's disease. A professional consensus recommends against such predictive testing, because it is not in children's best interest. Critics disagree. The Best Interests Standard can be a powerful way to resolve such disputes. This paper begins by analyzing its meaning into three necessary and jointly sufficient conditions showing it: is an "umbrella" (...)
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  25. Loretta Torrago (2000). Vague Causation. Noûs 34 (3):313–347.score: 3.0
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  26. Stanlie M. James & Abena P. A. Busia (eds.) (1993). Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women. Routledge.score: 3.0
    Theorizing Black Feminisms outlines some of the crucial debates going on among Black feminists today. In doing so it brings together a collection of some of the most exciting work by Black women scholars. The book encompasses a wide range of diverse subjects and refuses to be limited by notions of disciplinary boundaries or divisions between theory and practice. Theorizing Black Feminisms combines essays on literature, sociology, history, political science, anthropology, and art. As such it will be vital reading for (...)
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  27. Loretta M. Kopelman, David Resnick & Douglas L. Weed (2004). What is the Role of the Precautionary Principle in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):255 – 258.score: 3.0
    (2004). What is the Role of the Precautionary Principle in the Philosophy of Medicine and Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy: Vol. 29, No. 3, pp. 255-258.
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  28. Loretta M. Kopelman (2012). On Justifying Pediatric Research Without the Prospect of Clinical Benefit. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):32 - 34.score: 3.0
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 32-34, January 2012.
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  29. Loretta M. Kopelman (2007). The Best Interests Standard for Incompetent or Incapacitated Persons of All Ages. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):187-196.score: 3.0
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  30. Kenneth DeVille & Loretta M. Kopelman (2003). Diversity, Trust, and Patient Care: Affirmative Action in Medical Education 25 Years After Bakke. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (4):489 – 516.score: 3.0
    The U.S. Supreme Court's seminal 1978 Bakke decision, now 25 years old, has an ambiguous and endangered legacy. Justice Lewis Powell's opinion provided a justification that allowed leaders in medical education to pursue some affirmative action policies while at the same time undermining many other potential defenses. Powell asserted that medical schools might have a "compelling interest" in the creation of a diverse student body. But Powell's compromise jeopardized affirmative action since it blocked many justifications for responding to increases (...)
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  31. Mary Molewyk Doornbos (2005). Transforming Care: A Christian Vision of Nursing Practice. William E. Eerdmans Pub..score: 3.0
    Introduction Loretta is taking ice chips to the client in room 5723 when she realizes that something has gone wrong. A loud, frightened voice is coming from ...
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  32. Loretta M. Kopelman (1994). Case Method and Casuistry: The Problem of Bias. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (1).score: 3.0
    Case methods of reasoning are persuasive, but we need to address problems of bias in order to use them to reach morally justifiable conclusions. A bias is an unwarranted inclination or a special perspective that disposes us to mistaken or one-sided judgments. The potential for bias arises at each stage of a case method of reasoning including in describing, framing, selecting and comparing of cases and paradigms. A problem of bias occurs because to identify the relevant features for such purposes, (...)
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  33. Loretta M. Kopelman (2002). If HIV/AIDS is Punishment, Who is Bad? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (2):231 – 243.score: 3.0
    HIV/AIDS strikes with the greatest frequency in sub-Saharan Africa, a region lacking resources to deal with this epidemic. To keep millions more people from dying, wealthy countries must provide more help. Yet deeply ingrained biases may distance the sick from those who could provide far more aid. One such prejudice is viewing disease as punishment for sin. This 'punishment theory of disease" ascribes moral blame to those who get sick or those with special relations to them. Religious versions hold that (...)
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  34. Loretta M. Kopelman (2005). Rejecting the Baby Doe Rules and Defending a "Negative" Analysis of the Best Interests Standard. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):331 – 352.score: 3.0
    Two incompatible policies exist for guiding medical decisions for extremely premature, sick, or terminally ill infants, the Best Interests Standard and the newer, 20-year old "Baby Doe" Rules. The background, including why there were two sets of Baby Doe Rules, and their differences with the Best Interests Standard, are illustrated. Two defenses of the Baby Doe Rules are considered and rejected. The first, held by Reagan, Koop, and others, is a "right-to-life" defense. The second, held by some leaders of the (...)
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  35. Loretta Torrago (1999). Vagueness and Identity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1999:161-170.score: 3.0
    The view that identity can be vague is the view that there are statements of identity which are neither true or false. The view that composition can be vague is the view that unities can have borderline-constituents—elements that are neither parts nor non-parts of some larger unity. The case for vague identity is typically made by way of an argument for the vagueness of composition. In what follows, I argue that vague identity does not depend on the vagueness of composition; (...)
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  36. Loretta M. Kopelman & Arthur E. Kopelman (2007). Using a New Analysis of the Best Interests Standard to Address Cultural Disputes: Whose Data, Which Values? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 28 (5):373-391.score: 3.0
    Clinicians sometimes disagree about how much to honor surrogates’ deeply held cultural values or traditions when they differ from those of the host country. Such a controversy arose when parents requested a cultural accommodation to let their infant die by withdrawing life saving care. While both the parents and clinicians claimed to be using the Best Interests Standard to decide what to do, they were at an impasse. This standard is analyzed into three necessary and jointly sufficient conditions and used (...)
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  37. Loretta M. Kopelman (2000). Children as Research Subjects: A Dilemma. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 25 (6):723-744.score: 3.0
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  38. Loretta M. Kopelman (1996). Ethical Assumptions and Ambiguities in the Americans with Disabilities Act. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 21 (2):187-208.score: 3.0
    The Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) promotes social justice by protecting disabled persons from discrimination and prejudice. It seeks equality of opportunity for them and protects their well being by giving them fair access to goods, services and benefits. These rights are circumscribed in the ADA, however, by constraints of cost, efficiency, utility, and certain social mores. The ADA offers little direction about how to set priorities when these values come into conflict, or about whether equality of opportunity favors equivalent (...)
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  39. Loretta M. Kopelman (1990). What is Applied About "Applied" Philosophy? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (2):199-218.score: 3.0
    "Applied" is a technical term describing a variety of new philosophical enterprises. The author examines and rejects the view that these fields are derivative. Whatever principles, judgments, or background theories that are employed to solve problems in these areas are either changed by how they are used, or at least the possibility exists of their being changed. Hence we ought to stop calling these endeavors "applied", or agree that the meaning of "apply" will have to include the possibility that what (...)
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  40. Loretta M. Kopelman (1995). Conceptual and Moral Disputes About Futile and Useful Treatments. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (2):109-121.score: 3.0
    A series of cases have crystallized disputes about when medical treatments are useful or futile, and consequently about the doctor-patient relationship, resource allocation, communication, empathy, relief of suffering, autonomy, undertreatment, overtreatment, paternalism and palliative care. It is helpful to understand that utility and futility are complimentary concepts and that judgments about whether treatments are useful or futile in the contested cases have common features. They are: (1) grounded in medical science, (2) value laden, (3) at or near the threshold of (...)
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  41. Loretta M. Kopelman (2004). Minimal Risk as an International Ethical Standard in Research. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (3):351 – 378.score: 3.0
    Classifying research proposals by risk of harm is fundamental to the approval process and the most pivotal risk category in most regulations is that of “minimal risk.” If studies have no more than a minimal risk, for example, a nearly worldwide consensus exists that review boards may sometimes: (1) expedite review, (2) waive or modify some or all elements of informed consent, or (3) enroll vulnerable subjects including healthy children, incapacitated persons and prisoners even if studies do not hold out (...)
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  42. Loretta M. Kopelman (1994). Normal Grief: Good or Bad? Health or Disease? Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (4):209-220.score: 3.0
  43. Loretta M. Kopelman (2004). Adolescents as Doubly-Vulnerable Research Subjects. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):50-52.score: 3.0
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  44. Loretta M. Kopelman & Wendy E. Mouradian (2001). Do Children Get Their Fair Share of Health and Dental Care? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (2):127 – 136.score: 3.0
  45. Loretta M. Kopelman & Laurence B. McCullough (1999). Hume, Bioethics, and Philosophy of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (4):315 – 321.score: 3.0
  46. Loretta M. Kopelman (1998). Bioethics and Humanities: What Makes Us One Field? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (4):356 – 368.score: 3.0
    Bioethics and humanities (inclusive of medical ethics, health care ethics, environmental ethics, research ethics, philosophy and medicine, literature and medicine, and so on) seems like one field; yet colleagues come from different academic disciplines with distinct languages, methods, traditions, core curriculum and competency examinations. The author marks six related "framework" features that unite and make it one distinct field. It is a commitment to (1) work systematically on some of the momentous and well-defined sets of problems about the human condition (...)
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  47. Loretta Kopelman (1986). Consent and Randomized Clinical Trials: Are There Moral or Design Problems? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 11 (4):317-345.score: 3.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine whether randomized clinical trial (RCT) methods are necessarily morally problematic. If they are intrinsically problematic, then there may be a dilemma such that tragic choices might have to be made between this socially very useful method for making medical progress on the one hand, and patients' rights and welfare, or physicans' duties on the other. It is argued that the dilemma may be avoided if RCTs can sometimes be viewed as an honorable (...)
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  48. Loretta M. Kopelman (1994). Informed Consent and Anonymous Tissue Samples: The Case of Hiv Seroprevalence Studies. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (6):525-552.score: 3.0
    anonymous tissue samples obtained in hospitals and clinics without donor consent. This can be justified as a response to a public health emergency, but should not be seen as setting a precedent for waiving consent whenever samples are anonymous. The following recommendations grow out of this discussion: (1) Studies using anonymous tissue samples should not be automatically exempt from consent requirements, and consent should not be waived simply to avoid anticipated refusals, low participation rates or self selection bias. (2) The (...)
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  49. Loretta Dornisch (forthcoming). Book Review: Whispers of Liberation: Feminist Perspectives on the New Testament. [REVIEW] Interpretation 54 (1):96-96.score: 3.0
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  50. Loretta M. Kopelman (2006). Bioethics as a Second-Order Discipline: Who is Not a Bioethicist? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):601 – 628.score: 3.0
    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," (...)
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