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  1. Amy Allen (2008). Power and the Politics of Difference: Oppression, Empowerment, and Transnational Justice. Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 156-172.
    This paper examines Young’s conception of power, arguing that it is incomplete, in at least two ways. First, Young tends to equate the term power with the narrower notions of ‘ oppression ’ and ‘domination’. Thus, Young lacks a satisfactory analysis of individual and collective empowerment. Second, as Young herself admits, it is not obvious that her analysis of power can be useful in the context of thinking about transnational justice. Allen concludes by considering one way in which Young’s analysis (...)
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  2. Amy Allen (1999). The Power of Feminist Theory: Domination, Resistance, Solidarity. Westview Press.
    Power is clearly a crucial concept for feminist theory. Insofar as feminists are interested in analyzing power, it is because they have an interest in understanding, critiquing, and ultimately challenging the multiple array of unjust power relations affecting women in contemporary Western societies, including sexism, racism, heterosexism, and class oppression.In The Power of Feminist Theory, Amy Allen diagnoses the inadequacies of previous feminist conceptions of power, and draws on the work of a diverse group of theorists of power, including Michel (...)
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  3. Amy Allen (1998). Rethinking Power. Hypatia 13 (1):21 - 40.
    This paper argues that feminists have yet to develop a satisfactory account of power. Existing feminist accounts of power tend to have a one-sided emphasis either on power as domination or on power as empowerment. This conceptual one-sided-ness must be overcome if feminists are to develop an account complex enough to illuminate women's diverse experiences with power. Such an account is sketched here.
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  4. Louise M. Antony & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2002). A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity. Westview Press.
    A book of tremendous influence when it first appeared, A Mind of One's Own reminded readers that the tradition of Western philosophy-- in particular, the ideals of reason and objectivity-- has come down to us from white males, nearly all of whom are demonstrably sexist, even misogynist. In this second edition, the original authors continue to ask, What are the implications of this fact for contemporary feminists working within this tradition? The second edition pursues this question about the value of (...)
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  5. Mercedes Arriaga Flórez (ed.) (2006). Sin Carne: Representaciones y Simulacros Del Cuerpo Femenino: Tecnología, Comunicación y Poder. Arcibel Editores.
  6. Lawrie Balfour (2005). Representative Women: Slavery, Citizenship, and Feminist Theory in Du Bois's “Damnation of Women”. Hypatia 20 (3):127-148.
  7. Brigitte Bargetz (2015). The Distribution of Emotions: Affective Politics of Emancipation. Hypatia 30 (3):580-596.
    Currently, affect and emotions are a widely discussed political topic. At least since the early 1990s, different disciplines—from the social sciences and humanities to science and technoscience—have increasingly engaged in studying and conceptualizing affect, emotion, feeling, and sensation, evoking yet another turn that is frequently framed as the “affective turn.” Within queer feminist affect theory, two positions have emerged: following Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's well-known critique, there are either more “paranoid” or more “reparative” approaches toward affect. Whereas the latter emphasize the (...)
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  8. Victoria Barker (1997). Definition and the Question of “Woman”. Hypatia 12 (2):185-215.
  9. Sandra Bartky (1993). Reply to Commentators on Femininity and Domination. Hypatia 8 (1):192-196.
  10. Elizabeth Ann Bartlett (1989). Sarah Grimké: Letters on the Equality of the Sexes and Other Essays. Hypatia 4 (1):175-180.
  11. Paul Benson (2007). Feminism and the A-Word: Power and Community in the University. Hypatia 22 (4):223-229.
  12. Paul Benson (1990). Feminist Second Thoughts About Free Agency. Hypatia 5 (3):47-64.
  13. Sandrine Bergès (2016). A Republican Housewife: Marie‐Jeanne Phlipon Roland on Women's Political Role. Hypatia 31 (1):107-122.
    In this paper I look at the philosophical struggles of one eighteenth-century woman writer to reconcile a desire and obvious capacity to participate in the creation of republican ideals and their applications on the one hand, and on the other a deeply held belief that women's role in a republic is confined to the domestic realm. I argue that Marie-Jeanne Phlipon Roland's philosophical writings—three unpublished essays, published and unpublished letters, as well as parts of her memoirs—suggest that even though she (...)
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  14. Debra Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
  15. Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  16. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  17. Susan E. Bernick (1992). The Logic of the Development of Feminism; or, Is MacKinnon to Feminism as Parmenides Is to Greek Philosophy? Hypatia 7 (1):1-15.
  18. Megan Boler (2002). Feeling Power: Emotions and Education. Hypatia 17 (1):205-209.
  19. Susan Bordo (2004). Feminist Interpretations of Descartes. Hypatia 19 (2):190-194.
  20. Susan Bordo (1992). “Maleness” Revisited. Hypatia 7 (3):197-207.
  21. Susan J. Brison (2006). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  22. Susan J. Brison (2001). Contentious Freedom: Sex Work and Social Construction. Hypatia 21 (4):192-200.
  23. Belinda Brooks-Grodon (2002). Suzanne M. Zeedyk, and Fiona E. Raitt, The Implicit Relation of Psychology and Law: Women and Syndrome Evidence. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 10 (2):195-197.
  24. Norma Broude (1997). Impressionism a Feminist Reading : The Gendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century.
  25. Wendy Brown (1990). Manhood and Politics. Hypatia 5 (3):175-180.
  26. Robert L. Burgess (1994). The Family in a Changing World. Human Nature 5 (2):203-221.
    Increasing numbers of young mothers in the work force, more and more children requiring extrafamilial care, high rates of divorce, lower rates of remarriage, increasing numbers of female-headed households, growing numbers of zero-parent families, and significant occurrences of child maltreatment are just some of the social indicators indicative of the family in a changing world. These trends and their consequences for children are described and then examined from the perspectives of microeconomic theory, the relative-income hypothesis, sex-ratio theory, and one form (...)
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  27. Victoria I. Burke (2008). From Ethical Substance to Reflection: Hegel’s Antigone. Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 41 (3).
    Hegel’s treatment of Sophocles’s Antigone exposes a tension in our own landscape between religious and civil autonomy. This tension reflects a deeper tension between unreflective, implicit norms and reflective, explicit norms that can be autonomously endorsed. The tension is, as Hegel recognizes, of particular importance to women. Hegel’s characterization of this tension in light of Antigone is, as H.S. Harris argues, both a more developed and a more fundamental moment in the Phenomenology of Spirit than the moment of Enlightenment autonomy (...)
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  28. Victoria I. Burke (2007). Essence Today: Hegel and the Economics of Identity Politics. Philosophy Today 51 (1):79-90.
    The concept of essence is thought by many political theorists to be a residue of the patriarchal onto-theological tradition of metaphysics that needs to be (or has been) overcome by more progressive aims. The purpose of this paper is to examine the concept of essentialism in light of the treatment of the concept of essence in Hegel’s Science of Logic, and within the context of recent issues in critical race theory and feminism. I will argue that the role of an (...)
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  29. Sylvia Burrow (2005). The Political Structure of Emotion: From Dismissal to Dialogue. Hypatia 20 (4):27-43.
  30. Sylvia Burrow (2000). The Political Structure of Emotion: From Dismissal to Dialogue. Hypatia 20 (4):27-43.
  31. Nadya Burton (1998). Resistance to Prevention: Reconsidering Feminist Antiviolence Rhetoric. In Stanley French, Wanda Teays & Laura Purdy (eds.), Violence Against Women: Philosophical Perspectives. Cornell University Press 182--200.
  32. Judith Butler (1992). Response to Bordo's “Feminist Skepticism and the ‘Maleness’ of Philosophy”. Hypatia 7 (3):162-165.
  33. Peter Nathaniel Bwanali (2004). The Foundations of the Politics of Difference. Dissertation, Marquette University
    This dissertation approaches Iris Marion Young's politics of difference as an essential condition for deliberative democracy. It identifies and examines Young's arguments in four areas foundational to the politics of difference namely, inclusion, political equality, reasonableness and publicity. It contends that some of the arguments sustaining these foundations are shaky. Therefore, the dissertation attempts to improve the weak aspects of Young's arguments in order to solidify the basis for the politics of difference and, in so doing, facilitate the development of (...)
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  34. V. J. Callan (1986). Single Women, Voluntary Childlessness and Perceptions About Life and Marriage. Journal of Biosocial Science 18 (4):479-487.
  35. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, “False” Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51-82.
  36. Luisa Campuzano, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana & Casa de la Américas (1998). Mujeres Latinoamericanas Del Siglo Xx Historia y Cultura.
  37. Lorraine Code (1995). Incredulity, Experientialism and the Politics of Knowledge. In Incredulity, Experientialism and the Politics of Knowing. Routledge 58-82.
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  38. Mary Daly (2006). Amazon Grace: Re-Calling the Courage to Sin Big. Palgrave Macmillan.
    In her signature style, revolutionary Mary Daly takes you on a Quantum leap into a joyous future of victory for women. Daly, the groundbreaking author of such classics as Beyond God the Father and The Church and the Second Sex , explores the visions of Matilda Joslyn Gage, the great nineteenth-century philosopher, and reveals that her insights are stunningly helpful to twenty-first-century Voyagers seeking to overcome the fascism and life-hating fundamentalism that has infused current power structures. Daly shows us once (...)
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  39. Mary Daly (1998). Quintessence-- Realizing the Archaic Future: A Radical Elemental Feminist Manifesto. Beacon Press.
  40. Kathy Davis, Monique Leijenaar & Jantine Oldersma (eds.) (1991). The Gender of Power. Sage Publications.
    "This book does serve a very useful purpose in returning power to the centre of the feminist stage. . . . This book makes clear the ways in which the machinations of power are more subtle, widespread, and multiform than it sometimes appears. Further, the clarity of presentation means that it is also a text that can usefully be included on student bibliographies." --Women's Philosophy Review "The Gender of Power, which announces itself in the first line of its Preface as (...)
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  41. Carolyn Dipalma (1997). Book Review: Moira Gatens. Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power and Corporeality. New York: Routledge, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia 12 (4):217-222.
  42. Miranda Fricker (2003). Epistemic Injustice and a Role for Virtue in the Politics of Knowing. Metaphilosophy 34 (1/2):154-173.
    The dual aim of this article is to reveal and explain a certain phenomenon of epistemic injustice as manifested in testimonial practice, and to arrive at a characterisation of the anti–prejudicial intellectual virtue that is such as to counteract it. This sort of injustice occurs when prejudice on the part of the hearer leads to the speaker receiving less credibility than he or she deserves. It is suggested that where this phenomenon is systematic it constitutes an important form of oppression. (...)
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  43. Moira Gatens (1995). Imaginary Bodies: Ethics, Power, and Corporeality. Routledge.
    Imaginary Bodies is a collection of essays that offer a sustained challenge to traditional philosophical notions of the body, sex and gender. Moira Gatens explores alternative positions to dualism by exploring psychoanalytic, Foucaultian and Spinozist notions of embodiment. The book traces a largely neglected geneaology of philosophers from Spinoza, Nietzsche, Freud, Foucault and Deleuze and sets this tradition against that of the Enlightenment. What emerges are new ways of thinking those aspects of life which Gatens calls "imaginary." Confining herself to (...)
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  44. Jeffrey A. Gauthier (1999). Consent, Coercion, and Sexual Autonomy. In Keith Burgess-Jackson (ed.), A Most Detestable Crime: New Philosophical Essays on Rape. Oxford University Press 71-91.
    Feminist legal scholarship has questioned the usefulness of non-consent as a criterion for rape. Under conditions of generalized sexual oppression, consent may not be an adequate for absence of coercion. I defend this argument and propose that rape law reform can be usefully informed by state protection of workers in the capitalist labor market, where it is assumed that the parties occupy an unequal bargaining position.
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  45. Ruth Ginzberg (1992). Audre Lorde's (Nonessentialist) Lesbian Eros. Hypatia 7 (4):73 - 90.
    Audre Lorde reopened the question of the position of the erotic with respect to both knowledge and power in her 1983 essay "Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power." This is not a new question in the philosophical literature; it is a very old one. What is different about Audre Lorde's examination of Eros is that she starts with a decidedly lesbian conception of Eros, in marked contrast to other Western philosophers' work.
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  46. Grace Hunt (2010). Performing Dignity. Women in Philosophy Annual Journal of Papers 6:47-61.
  47. Christine James (1996). Reconceptualizing Masculinity: Review Essay. disClosure 1996 (Reason Incorporated):74-83.
    Recent feminist and postmodern thought has critiqued traditional conceptions of masculinity, describing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the "man of reason" has had on the history of philosophy, on consciousness, and on the academy. A common characteristic of the recent literature on masculinity is that it reflects the historical and cultural context in which it is written -- a context of binary, hierarchical dualisms which involve certain symbolic associations. These dualisms, such as Man-Woman, masculine-feminine, and reason-emotion, arguably find (...)
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  48. Karen Jones (2002). The Politics of Credibility. In Louise Antony & Charlotte Witt (eds.), A Mind of One's Own: Feminist Essays on Reason and Objectivity. Westview Press
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  49. Sonia Kruks (2012). Simone de Beauvoir and the Politics of Ambiguity. Oxford University Press.
    the first full length study of Beauvoir's political philosophy, this book both locates Beauvoir in her own intellectual and political context and demonstrates the continuing significance of her thinking. Beauvoir still speaks, in a unique voice, to many pressing questions concerning politics. These include, among others, the values and dangers of liberal humanism; how oppressed groups become complicit in their own oppression; how social identities are perpetuated; the limits to rationalism and the difficulties of political judgment; and the place of (...)
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  50. Margaret Ledwith (2009). Antonio Gramsci and Feminism: The Elusive Nature of Power. Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (6):684-697.
    From a feminist perspective, I am interested in 'women's ways of knowing' ( Belenky et al., 1997 ) and the relationship between knowledge, difference and power ( Goldberger et al., 1996 ). Here I trace the relevance of Gramsci to my own feminist consciousness, and the part he played in my journey to praxis. I also address feminism's intellectual debts, most particularly in relation to the concept of hegemony. The intellectual context has shifted in emphasis from macro- to micro-narratives which (...)
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