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  1. Cinzia Arruzza, A Wolf in the City. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019, Xi + 296 Pp.A Wolf in the City. [REVIEW]Christopher Bobonich - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):518-524.
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  2. Sergio Yona, Epicurean Ethics in Horace. The Psychology of Satire. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018, 360 Pp.Epicurean Ethics in Horace. The Psychology of Satire. [REVIEW]Michael Erler - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):513-518.
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  3. Kant’s Conception of Theodicy and His Argument From Metaphysical Evil Against It.Amit Kravitz - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):453-476.
    A series of attempts have been made to determine Kant’s exact position towards theodicy, and to understand whether it is a direct consequence of his critical philosophy or, rather, whether it is merely linked to some inner development within his critical philosophy. However, I argue that the question of Kant’s critical relation to theodicy has been misunderstood; and that in fact, Kant redefines the essence of the theodicean question anew. After introducing some major aspects of Kant‘s new conception of theodicy, (...)
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  4.  1
    The Six Faces of Beauty. Baumgarten on the Perfections of Knowledge in the Context of the German Enlightenment.Alessandro Nannini - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):477-512.
    In this essay, I investigate Baumgarten’s doctrine of the six perfections of knowledge, which is famously one of the most characteristic and enigmatic features of his philosophy. Recent scholarship has almost unanimously stressed the rhetorical background of the categories. Instead, I argue that Baumgarten elaborates his theory in close relationship with coeval philosophy. To support this claim, I examine the position of some Thomasian philosophers, such as Johann Liborius Zimmermann, who had indicated a list of criteria similar to that of (...)
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  5.  4
    Conceptions of Truth in Plato’s Sophist.Michail Peramatzis - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):333-378.
    The paper seeks to specify how, according to Plato’s Sophist, true statements achieve their being about objects and their saying that ‘what is about such objects is’. Drawing on the 6th definition of the sophist, I argue for a normative-teleological conception of truth in which the best condition of our soul –in its making statements or having mental states– consists in its seeking to attain the telos of truth. Further, on the basis of Plato’s discussion of original and image, his (...)
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  6. Avicenna on Mathematical Infinity.Mohammad Saleh Zarepour - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):379-425.
    Avicenna believed in mathematical finitism. He argued that magnitudes and sets of ordered numbers and numbered things cannot be actually infinite. In this paper, I discuss his arguments against the actuality of mathematical infinity. A careful analysis of the subtleties of his main argument, i. e., The Mapping Argument, shows that, by employing the notion of correspondence as a tool for comparing the sizes of mathematical infinities, he arrived at a very deep and insightful understanding of the notion of mathematical (...)
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  7. Kant über die Vollständigkeit der „Tafel der Kategorien der Freiheit“.Stephan Zimmermann - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (3):426-452.
    Kant’s repeated statement in the Critique of Pure Reason that the so-called table of judgements and, as a consequence, the table of pure concepts of the understanding or categories, is fully exhaustive is well-known. This ambitious assertion has worried and challenged generations of authors. However, thus far the entire discussion has completely disregarded the fact that in his Critique of Practical Reason Kant undertakes a coordinate venture. For the “Table of the Categories of Freedom”, which he sets out, with only (...)
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  8.  19
    Bolstering the Keystone: Kant on the Incomprehensibility of Freedom.Timothy Aylsworth - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):261-298.
    In this paper, I give an explanation and defense of Kant’s claim that we cannot comprehend how freedom is possible. I argue that this is a significant point that has been underappreciated in the secondary literature. My conclusion has a variety of implications both for Kant scholars and for those interested in Kantian ideas more generally. Most notably, if Kant is right that there are principled reasons why freedom is beyond our comprehension, then this would release his ethical views from (...)
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  9.  2
    Benjamin Harriman, Melissus and Eleatic Monism. (Cambridge Classical Studies.) Cambridge: Cambridge Universitiy Press, 2018, Xii+242 Pp.Melissus and Eleatic Monism. [REVIEW]Mathilde Brémond - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):324-327.
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  10.  5
    Infinite Time and Contingent Beings: Aquinas’s Third Way Revisited.Christopher Gilbert - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):189-208.
    Many commentators have accused Aquinas of committing either a formal or an informal fallacy in his Third Way argument. I believe it is possible to revise the Third Way argument so as to avoid such errors. I here present a revision of the first part of the Third Way that is immune to the objections most commonly raised against it, consonant with the basic tenets of Thomism, and plausible from a contemporary point of view.
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  11. Les Stoïciens Et Platon – Monistes Ou Dualistes?Vladimír Mikeš - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):299-323.
    The Stoics’ way of presenting principles – the active and the passive – is ambiguous because they say that principles are two while also suggesting that they are inseparable and thus interdependent. This ambiguity cannot be resolved in favour of one or the other side of the dilemma, as is shown by analysis of two possible models of the relations among principles – a causal and a categories-based model. This ambiguity is rather a necessary consequence of the Stoic view of (...)
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  12.  1
    Alan Kim (Ed.), Brill’s Companion to German Platonism. Leiden/Boston: Brill, 2019, Xi+388 Pp.Brill’s Companion to German Platonism. [REVIEW]Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):328-331.
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  13.  6
    Disentangling Cartesian Global Skepticism From Cartesian Problematic External-World Idealism in Kant’s Refutation.Roberto Horácio de Sá Pereira - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):242-260.
    Kant’s Refutation targets what he calls the problematic idealist. This is understood by the mainstream of Kantian scholarship as the global skeptic that Descartes briefly adumbrated in his first Meditation. The widespread view in the literature is that the fate of the Refutation is tied to its success as an argument against this Cartesian global skepticism. This consensus is what I want to question in this paper. I argue that Kant’s opponent – the problematic idealist – is not the Cartesian (...)
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  14.  84
    ‘Pushing Through’ in Plato’s Sophist: A New Reading of the Parity Assumption.Evan Rodriguez - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):159-188.
    At a crucial juncture in Plato’s Sophist, when the interlocutors have reached their deepest confusion about being and not-being, the Eleatic Visitor proclaims that there is yet hope. Insofar as they clarify one, he maintains, they will equally clarify the other. But what justifies the Visitor’s seemingly oracular prediction? A new interpretation explains how the Visitor’s hope is in fact warranted by the peculiar aporia they find themselves in. The passage describes a broader pattern of ‘exploring both sides’ that lends (...)
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  15.  5
    Kant, Eudaimonism, Act-Consequentialism and the Fact of Reason.Martin Sticker - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (2):209-241.
    Kant considers eudaimonism as his main opponent and he assumes that his ethics is the only viable alternative to eudaimonism. He does not explicitly address theories differing from both eudaimonism and from his own. I argue that whilst Kant and Act-Consequentialists advocate different normative principles, their positions share the important abstract feature that they establish what is to be done from a rational principle and not based on what is in the self-interest of the respective agent, as Kant thinks eudaimonism (...)
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  16.  7
    Dolf Rami, Existenz und Anzahl. Eine kritische Untersuchung von Freges Konzeption der Existenz. Paderborn: Mentis Verlag, 2018, 225 Seiten. [REVIEW]Christopher Badura - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):154-158.
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  17.  1
    Dolf Rami, Existenz und Anzahl. Eine kritische Untersuchung von Freges Konzeption der Existenz. Paderborn: Mentis Verlag, 2018, 225 Seiten.Existenz und Anzahl. Eine kritische Untersuchung von Freges Konzeption der Existenz. [REVIEW]Christopher Badura - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):154-158.
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  18.  2
    Das Recht in der Kritik der reinen Vernunft.Reinhard Brandt - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):131-149.
    Recent publications claim that Kant has been profoundly influenced by contemporary publications on juridical deductions. I try to show, that this cannot be right. The introductory note of the “Transcendental Deduction” poses two questions: “quid facti?” and “quid juris?”. The first is answered by the demonstration of the possibility of relations between pure concepts and pure intuition und sensations, the second by the implicit refutation of David Hume. Kant and his interpreters sustain the possibility of using juridical concepts, that are (...)
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  19. Aristotle on Self-Sufficiency, External Goods, and Contemplation.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):1-28.
    Aristotle tells us that contemplation is the most self-sufficient form of virtuous activity: we can contemplate alone, and with minimal resources, while moral virtues like courage require other individuals to be courageous towards, or courageous with. This is hard to square with the rest of his discussion of self-sufficiency in the Ethics: Aristotle doesn't generally seek to minimize the number of resources necessary for a flourishing human life, and seems happy to grant that such a life will be self-sufficient despite (...)
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  20.  2
    Perception and Pluralism: Leibniz’s Theological Derivation of Perception in Connection with Platonism, Rationalism and Substance Monism.Gastón Robert - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):56-101.
    This article discusses Leibniz’s claim that every substance is endowed with the property of perception in connection with Platonism, rationalism and the problem of substance monism. It is argued that Leibniz’s ascription of perception to every substance relies on his Platonic conception of finite things as imitations of God, in whom there is ‘infinite perception’. Leibniz’s Platonism, however, goes beyond the notion of imitation, including also the emanative causal relation and the logical priority of the absolute over the limited. It (...)
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  21.  2
    Anne-Lise Darras-Worms, Plotin, Traité 31 (V, 8): Sur la beauté intelligible, Introduction, traduction, commentaire et notes par Anne-Lise Darras-Worms (= Bibliothèque des Textes Philosophiques / Les Écrits de Plotin), Paris, 2018. pp. 303.Plotin, Traité 31 (V, 8): Sur la beauté intelligible. [REVIEW]Christian Vassallo - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):150-154.
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  22.  2
    Anne-Lise Darras-Worms, Plotin, Traité 31 (V, 8): Sur la beauté intelligible, Introduction, traduction, commentaire et notes par Anne-Lise Darras-Worms (= Bibliothèque des Textes Philosophiques / Les Écrits de Plotin), Paris, 2018. pp. 303. [REVIEW]Christian Vassallo - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):150-154.
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  23.  1
    The Kantian Capacity for Moral Self-Control: Abstraction at Two Levels.Marijana Vujoševiċ - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):102-130.
    As a rule, the Kantian capacity for self-control is interpreted as a kind of tool for compelling ourselves to act on the basis of the maxims we have adopted. To the extent that we merely acknowledge its role in following already-adopted maxims, however, we fail to capture the distinctive aspect of moral self-control identified by Kant. In this paper, I propose a fuller account of the Kantian capacity for moral self-control; I do so mainly by analyzing this capacity as our (...)
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  24.  9
    Spinoza on Action and Immanent Causation.Stephen Zylstra - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):29-55.
    I address an apparent conflict between Spinoza’s concepts of immanent causation and acting/doing [agere]. Spinoza apparently holds that an immanent cause undergoes [patitur] whatever it does. Yet according to his stated definition of acting and undergoing in the Ethics, this is impossible; to act is to be an adequate cause, while to undergo is to be merely a partial cause. Spinoza also seems committed to God’s being the adequate cause of all things, and, in a well-known passage, appears to deny (...)
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