Springer (2017)

Authors
Raul Hakli
University of Helsinki
Johanna Seibt
Aarhus University
Abstract
This volume offers eleven philosophical investigations into our future relations with social robots--robots that are specially designed to engage and connect with human beings. The contributors present cutting edge research that examines whether, and on which terms, robots can become members of human societies. Can our relations to robots be said to be "social"? Can robots enter into normative relationships with human beings? How will human social relations change when we interact with robots at work and at home? The authors of this volume explore these questions from the perspective of philosophy, cognitive science, psychology, and robotics. The first three chapters offer a taxonomy for the classification of simulated social interactions, investigate whether human social interactions with robots can be genuine, and discuss the significance of social relations for the formation of human individuality. Subsequent chapters clarify whether robots could be said to actually follow social norms, whether they could live up to the social meaning of care in caregiving professions, and how we will need to program robots so that they can negotiate the conventions of human social space and collaborate with humans. Can we perform joint actions with robots, where both sides need to honour commitments, and how will such new commitments and practices change our regional cultures? The authors connect research in social robotics and empirical studies in Human-Robot Interaction to recent debates in social ontology, social cognition, as well as ethics and philosophy of technology. The book is a response to the challenge that social robotics presents for our traditional conceptions of social interaction, which presuppose such essential capacities as consciousness, intentionality, agency, and normative understanding. The authors develop insightful answers along new interdisciplinary pathways in "robophilosophy," a new research area that will help us to shape the "robot revolution," the distinctive technological change of the beginning 21st century.
Keywords social robots  sociality  normativity  social interaction  human-robot interaction  robophilosophy
Categories (categorize this paper)
Buy this book Find it on Amazon.com
ISBN(s) 978-3-319-53131-1
Options
Edit this record
Mark as duplicate
Export citation
Find it on Scholar
Request removal from index
Revision history

Download options

PhilArchive copy


Upload a copy of this paper     Check publisher's policy     Papers currently archived: 62,513
External links

Setup an account with your affiliations in order to access resources via your University's proxy server
Configure custom proxy (use this if your affiliation does not provide a proxy)
Through your library
Chapters BETA

References found in this work BETA

No references found.

Add more references

Citations of this work BETA

Add more citations

Similar books and articles

Modest Sociality and the Distinctiveness of Intention.Michael E. Bratman - 2009 - Philosophical Studies 144 (1):149-165.
Toward a Network Sociality.Andreas Wittel - 2001 - Theory, Culture and Society 18 (6):51-76.
Space and Sociality.Jeff Malpas - 1997 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (1):53 – 79.
Heidegger, Sociality, and Human Agency.B. Scot Rousse - 2016 - European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):417-451.
Psychology and Groups at the Junction of Genes and Culture.R. Caporael Linnda - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):819-821.
Sociality and Money1.François Bouchetoux Emmanuel Levinas - 2007 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 16 (3):203-207.
Social Glue and Norms of Sociality.David Copp - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (12):3387-3397.
Sociality as a Philosophically Significant Category.Margaret Gilbert - 1994 - Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (3):5-25.

Analytics

Added to PP index
2019-01-06

Total views
35 ( #307,712 of 2,446,507 )

Recent downloads (6 months)
6 ( #120,996 of 2,446,507 )

How can I increase my downloads?

Downloads

My notes