15 found
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Andrew P. Bayliss [11]Anne Bayliss [1]A. BAyliss [1]Andrew J. Bayliss [1]
Andrew Bayliss [1]Alex Bayliss [1]
  1.  19
    Eye Movements Reveal Sustained Implicit Processing of Others' Mental States.Dana Schneider, Andrew P. Bayliss, Stefanie I. Becker & Paul E. Dux - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):433-438.
  2.  23
    Affective Evaluations of Objects Are Influenced by Observed Gaze Direction and Emotional Expression.A. BAyliss, A. Frischen, M. Fenske & S. Tipper - 2007 - Cognition 104 (3):644-653.
    Gaze direction signals another person’s focus of interest. Facial expressions convey information about their mental state. Appropriate responses to these signals should reflect their combined influence, yet current evidence suggests that gaze-cueing effects for objects near an observed face are not modulated by its emotional expression. Here, we extend the investigation of perceived gaze direction and emotional expression by considering their combined influence on affective judgments. While traditional response-time measures revealed equal gaze-cueing effects for happy and disgust faces, affective evaluations (...)
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  3.  77
    “Gaze Leading”: Initiating Simulated Joint Attention Influences Eye Movements and Choice Behavior.Andrew P. Bayliss, Emily Murphy, Claire K. Naughtin, Ada Kritikos, Leonhard Schilbach & Stefanie I. Becker - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 142 (1):76.
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  4.  24
    Physical and Mental Effort Disrupts the Implicit Sense of Agency.Emma E. Howard, S. Gareth Edwards & Andrew P. Bayliss - 2016 - Cognition 157:114-125.
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  5.  26
    Grasping the Concept of Personal Property.Merryn D. Constable, Ada Kritikos & Andrew P. Bayliss - 2011 - Cognition 119 (3):430-437.
    The concept of property is integral to personal and societal development, yet understanding of the cognitive basis of ownership is limited. Objects are the most basic form of property, so our physical interactions with owned objects may elucidate nuanced aspects of ownership. We gave participants a coffee mug to decorate, use and keep. The experimenter also designed a mug of her own. In Experiment 1, participants performed natural lifting actions with each mug. Participants lifted the Experimenter’s mug with greater care, (...)
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  6.  43
    A Temporally Sustained Implicit Theory of Mind Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders.Dana Schneider, Virginia P. Slaughter, Andrew P. Bayliss & Paul E. Dux - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):410-417.
    Eye movements during false-belief tasks can reveal an individual's capacity to implicitly monitor others' mental states (theory of mind - ToM). It has been suggested, based on the results of a single-trial-experiment, that this ability is impaired in those with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite neurotypical-like performance on explicit ToM measures. However, given there are known attention differences and visual hypersensitivities in ASD it is important to establish whether such impairments are evident over time. In addition, investigating implicit (...)
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  7.  20
    Eyes That Bind Us: Gaze Leading Induces an Implicit Sense of Agency.Lisa J. Stephenson, S. Gareth Edwards, Emma E. Howard & Andrew P. Bayliss - 2018 - Cognition 172:124-133.
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  8.  34
    Orienting of Attention Via Observed Eye Gaze is Head-Centred.Andrew P. Bayliss, Giuseppe di Pellegrino & Steven P. Tipper - 2004 - Cognition 94 (1):1-10.
    Observing averted eye gaze results in the automatic allocation of attention to the gazed-at location. The role of the orientation of the face that produces the gaze cue was investigated. The eyes in the face could look left or right in a head-centred frame, but the face itself could be oriented 90 degrees clockwise or anticlockwise such that the eyes were gazing up or down. Significant cueing effects to targets presented to the left or right of the screen were found (...)
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  9.  6
    Followers Are Not Followed: Observed Group Interactions Modulate Subsequent Social Attention.Francesca Capozzi, Cristina Becchio, Cesco Willemse & Andrew P. Bayliss - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (5):531-535.
  10.  23
    I Want to Help You, but I Am Not Sure Why: Gaze-Cuing Induces Altruistic Giving.Robert D. Rogers, Andrew P. Bayliss, Anna Szepietowska, Laura Dale, Lydia Reeder, Gloria Pizzamiglio, Karolina Czarna, Judi Wakeley, Phillip J. Cowen & Steven P. Tipper - 2014 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 143 (2):763-777.
  11.  17
    Self-Generated Cognitive Fluency as an Alternative Route to Preference Formation.Merryn D. Constable, Andrew P. Bayliss, Steven P. Tipper & Ada Kritikos - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (1):47-52.
    People tend to prefer fluently processed over harder to process information. In this study we examine two issues concerning fluency and preference. First, previous research has pre-selected fluent and non-fluent materials. We did not take this approach yet show that the fluency of individuals’ idiosyncratic on-line interactions with a given stimulus can influence preference formation. Second, while processing fluency influences preference, the opposite also may be true: preferred stimuli could be processed more fluently than non-preferred. Participants performed a visual search (...)
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  12. Dating Stonehenge.Alex Bayliss, C. Bronk Ramsey & F. Gerry McCormac - 1997 - In Science and Stonehenge. pp. 39-59.
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  13.  20
    History (K.) Clinton Eleusis. The Inscriptions on Stone. Documents of the Sanctuary of the Two Goddesses and Public Documents of the Deme. (The Archaeological Society at Athens Library 236). The Archaeological Society at Athens, 2005. 2 Vols. IA: Pp. Xx + 499; IB: Pp. 307. 130. 9608145481. [REVIEW]Andrew J. Bayliss - 2007 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:204-.
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  14.  17
    Vulnerability to Depression is Associated with a Failure to Acquire Implicit Social Appraisals.Andrew P. Bayliss, Steven P. Tipper, Judi Wakeley, Phillip J. Cowen & Robert D. Rogers - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 31 (4):825-833.
  15.  11
    The Impact of Social Gaze Perception on Attention.Steven Tipper & Andrew Bayliss - 2011 - In Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. Oxford University Press.
    This article reviews research into the attention mechanisms underlying a critical behavior in social interactions. It discusses findings from studies that investigate social gaze as a cue to attention and considers the perceptual mechanisms that may underlie these effects and their possible social functions. There is still debate as to whether gaze stimuli are “special” in terms of the attention processes engaged. However, there is evidence for the distinctive nature of gaze cues in their involvement in other aspects of social (...)
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