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Christine J. Thomas [10]Christine Jean Thomas [1]
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Christine J. Thomas
Dartmouth College
Christine Thomas
Oklahoma State University
  1.  94
    Speaking of Something: Plato’s Sophist and Plato’s Beard.Christine J. Thomas - 2008 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):pp. 631-667.
    The Eleatic Visitor speaks forcefully when he insists, ‘Necessarily, whenever there is speech, it is speech of something; it is impossible for it not to be of something’. For ‘if it were not of anything, it would not be speech at all; for we showed that it is impossible for there to be speech that is speech of nothing’. Presumably, at 263c10, when he claims to have ‘shown’ that it is impossible for speech to be of nothing, the Visitor is (...)
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  2.  58
    Plato on Metaphysical Explanation: Does 'Participating' Mean Nothing?Christine J. Thomas - 2014 - Studia Philosophica Estonica 7 (2):168.
    According to Aristotle, Plato's efforts at metaphysical explanation not only fail, they are nonsensical. In particular, Plato's appeals to Forms as metaphysically explanatory of the sensibles that participate in them is "empty talk" since "'participating' means nothing". I defend Plato against Aristotle's charge by identifying a particular, substantive model of metaphysical predication as the favored model of Plato's late ontology. The model posits two basic metaphysical predication relations: self-predication and participation. In order to understand the participation relation, it is important (...)
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  3.  60
    Theaetetus’ Snubness and the Contents of Plato’s Thoughts.Christine J. Thomas - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):53-74.
  4.  47
    Plato on Parts and Wholes: The Metaphysics of Structure. [REVIEW]Christine J. Thomas - 2007 - The Classical Review 57 (1):33-35.
  5. Names, Thoughts and Objects in Plato's "Cratylus", "Theaetetus" and "Sophist".Christine J. Thomas - 1999 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    In this dissertation I explore Plato's views about the nature of language and thought, and their relations to the world. Plato is sometimes thought to hold that meaningful terms do not require referents at all. Others argue that he holds a referential theory of meaning according to which the meaning of a term just is its referent. I reject both of these views, arguing that Plato thinks that a significant term must have a referent but that the referent of a (...)
     
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  6. Plato's Prometheanism.Christine J. Thomas - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 31:203-231.
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  7.  57
    Inquiry Without Names in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 341-364.
    The interlocutors of Plato’s Cratylus agree that “it is far better to learn and to inquire from the things themselves than from their names”. Although surprisingly little attention has been paid to these remarks, at least some commentators view Plato as articulating a preference for direct, nonlinguistic cognitive access to the objects of inquiry. Another commentator takes Plato simply to recommend first-hand, yet linguistic, experience in addition to instruction from experts. This paper defends, in contrast to both interpretations, the view (...)
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  8.  35
    The Case of the Etymologies in Plato's Cratylus.Christine J. Thomas - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (2):218–226.
  9.  28
    Plato's Introduction of Forms (Review).Christine Jean Thomas - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (3):485-486.
    Christine Jean Thomas - Plato's Introduction of Forms - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:3 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.3 485-486 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Christine J. Thomas Dartmouth College R. M. Dancy. Plato's Introduction of Forms. Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Pp. xii + 348. Cloth, $75.00. Russell Dancy's recent book could easily bear the title, 'A Socratic Theory of Definition'. The first two-thirds of the text extract and examine various tenets (...)
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  10.  18
    Plato's Prometheanism.Christine J. Thomas - 2006 - In David Sedley (ed.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy Xxxi: Winter 2006. Oxford University Press. pp. 31--203.
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  11.  2
    ‘Learning’ and Learning at Euthydemus 275d–278d.Christine J. Thomas - 2019 - Australasian Philosophical Review 3 (2):191-197.
    ABSTRACT Early in Plato’s Euthydemus, sophistical arguments threaten the intelligibility of the process of learning. According to M. M. McCabe, Socrates resists the sophists’ arguments by resisting their problematic replacement model of change. The replacement model proposes that one item is simply replaced with a nonidentical item. Socrates is said to endorse a rival metaphysics of temporally extended, teleologically structured activities. The rival model allows an enduring subject to survive ‘aspect changes’ by occupying distinct stages in a continuous, unified process. (...)
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