13 found
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  1.  19
    Ethical use of artificial intelligence to prevent sudden cardiac death: an interview study of patient perspectives.Marieke A. R. Bak, Georg L. Lindinger, Hanno L. Tan, Jeannette Pols, Dick L. Willems, Ayca Koçar & Menno T. Maris - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundThe emergence of artificial intelligence (AI) in medicine has prompted the development of numerous ethical guidelines, while the involvement of patients in the creation of these documents lags behind. As part of the European PROFID project we explore patient perspectives on the ethical implications of AI in care for patients at increased risk of sudden cardiac death (SCD).AimExplore perspectives of patients on the ethical use of AI, particularly in clinical decision-making regarding the implantation of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD).MethodsSemi-structured, future scenario-based (...)
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  2.  41
    Developments in the practice of physician-assisted dying: perceptions of physicians who had experience with complex cases.Marianne C. Snijdewind, Donald G. van Tol, Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & Dick L. Willems - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):292-296.
    Background Since the enactment of the euthanasia law in the Netherlands, there has been a lively public debate on assisted dying that may influence the way patients talk about euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide with their physicians and the way physicians experience the practice of EAS. Aim To show what developments physicians see in practice and how they perceive the influence of the public debate on the practice of EAS. Methods We conducted a secondary analysis of in-depth interviews with 28 Dutch (...)
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  3.  53
    Can physicians conceive of performing euthanasia in case of psychiatric disease, dementia or being tired of living?Eva Elizabeth Bolt, Marianne C. Snijdewind, Dick L. Willems, Agnes van der Heide & Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (8):592-598.
  4.  24
    Parents who wish no further treatment for their child.Mirjam A. de Vos, Antje A. Seeber, Sjef K. M. Gevers, Albert P. Bos, Ferry Gevers & Dick L. Willems - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):195-200.
    Background In the ethical and clinical literature, cases of parents who want treatment for their child to be withdrawn against the views of the medical team have not received much attention. Yet resolution of such conflicts demands much effort of both the medical team and parents. Objective To discuss who can best protect a child9s interests, which often becomes a central issue, putting considerable pressure on mutual trust and partnership. Methods We describe the case of a 3-year-old boy with acquired (...)
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  5.  11
    Health data research on sudden cardiac arrest: perspectives of survivors and their next-of-kin.Dick L. Willems, Hanno L. Tan, Marieke T. Blom, Rens Veeken & Marieke A. R. Bak - 2021 - BMC Medical Ethics 22 (1):1-15.
    BackgroundConsent for data research in acute and critical care is complex as patients become at least temporarily incapacitated or die. Existing guidelines and regulations in the European Union are of limited help and there is a lack of literature about the use of data from this vulnerable group. To aid the creation of a patient-centred framework for responsible data research in the acute setting, we explored views of patients and next-of-kin about the collection, storage, sharing and use of genetic and (...)
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  6.  94
    Technology in medicine: Ontology, epistemology, ethics and social philosophy at the crossroads.Rein Vos & Dick L. Willems - 2000 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (1):1-7.
    In reference to the different approaches in philosophy(of medicine) of the nature of (medical) technology,this article introduces the topic of this specialissue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, that is,the way the different forms of medical technologyfunction in everyday medical practice. The authorselaborate on the active role technology plays inshaping our views on disease, illness, and the body,whence in shaping our world.
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  7.  25
    Witnessing Quality of Life of Persons with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities. A practical-Philosophical Approach.Erik Olsman, Appolonia M. Nieuwenhuijse & Dick L. Willems - 2021 - Health Care Analysis 29 (2):144-153.
    Persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities cannot speak about their Quality of Life, which makes it necessary to involve others. In current approaches, these ‘others’ are seen as assessors trying to describe QoL as objectively as possible, which involves a reduction of their experiences, through which they develop knowledge on the QoL of the person with PIMD. The objective of this paper is to give caregivers’ knowledge on the QoL of a person with PIMD a theoretical basis that values (...)
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  8.  64
    Understanding Palliative Cancer Chemotherapy: About Shared Decisions and Shared Trajectories.Susanne J. de Kort, Jeannette Pols, Dick J. Richel, Nelleke Koedoot & Dick L. Willems - 2010 - Health Care Analysis 18 (2):164-174.
    Most models of patient-physician communication take decision-making as a central concept. However, we found that often the treatment course of metastatic cancer patients is not easy to describe in straightforward terms used in decision-making models but is instead frequently more erratic. Our aim was to analyse these processes as trajectories. We used a longitudinal case study of 13 patients with metastatic colorectal and pancreatic cancer for whom palliative chemotherapy was a treatment option, and analysed 65 semi-structured interviews. We analysed three (...)
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  9.  45
    Research monitoring by US medical institutions to protect human subjects: compliance or quality improvement?Jean Philippe de Jong, Myra C. B. van Zwieten & Dick L. Willems - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (4):236-241.
    In recent years, to protect the rights and welfare of human subjects, institutions in the USA have begun to set up programmes to monitor ongoing medical research. These programmes provide routine, onsite oversight, and thus go beyond existing oversight such as investigating suspected misconduct or reviewing paperwork provided by investigators. However, because of a lack of guidelines and evidence, institutions have had little guidance in setting up their programmes. To help institutions make the right choices, we used interviews and document (...)
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  10.  4
    Correction: Ethical use of artificial intelligence to prevent sudden cardiac death: an interview study of patient perspectives.Menno T. Maris, Ayca Koçar, Dick L. Willems, Jeannette Pols, Hanno L. Tan, Georg L. Lindinger & Marieke A. R. Bak - 2024 - BMC Medical Ethics 25 (1):1-2.
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  11.  12
    Towards trust-based governance of health data research.Marieke A. R. Bak, M. Corrette Ploem, Hanno L. Tan, M. T. Blom & Dick L. Willems - 2023 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 26 (2):185-200.
    Developments in medical big data analytics may bring societal benefits but are also challenging privacy and other ethical values. At the same time, an overly restrictive data protection regime can form a serious threat to valuable observational studies. Discussions about whether data privacy or data solidarity should be the foundational value of research policies, have remained unresolved. We add to this debate with an empirically informed ethical analysis. First, experiences with the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) within (...)
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  12.  19
    Contextual Exceptionalism After Death: An Information Ethics Approach to Post-Mortem Privacy in Health Data Research.Marieke A. R. Bak & Dick L. Willems - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (4):1-20.
    In this article, we use the theory of Information Ethics to argue that deceased people have a prima facie moral right to privacy in the context of health data research, and that this should be reflected in regulation and guidelines. After death, people are no longer biological subjects but continue to exist as informational entities which can still be harmed/damaged. We find that while the instrumental value of recognising post-mortem privacy lies in the preservation of the social contract for health (...)
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  13.  24
    Influence of response shift and disposition on patient-reported outcomes may lead to suboptimal medical decisions: a medical ethics perspective.Iris D. Hartog, Dick L. Willems, Wilbert B. van den Hout, Michael Scherer-Rath, Tom H. Oreel, José P. S. Henriques, Pythia T. Nieuwkerk, Hanneke W. M. van Laarhoven & Mirjam A. G. Sprangers - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):1-7.
    Patient-reported outcomes are frequently used for medical decision making, at the levels of both individual patient care and healthcare policy. Evidence increasingly shows that PROs may be influenced by patients’ response shifts and dispositions. We identify how response shifts and dispositions may influence medical decisions on both the levels of individual patient care and health policy. We provide examples of these influences and analyse the consequences from the perspectives of ethical principles and theories of just distribution. If influences of response (...)
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