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Mark A. Michael [17]Mark Alan Michael [2]
  1.  33
    Utilitarianism and Retributivism: What's the Difference?Mark A. Michael - 1992 - American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (2):173 - 182.
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  2.  27
    The Problem with Methodological Pragmatism.Mark A. Michael - 2012 - Environmental Ethics 34 (2):135-157.
    Methodological pragmatists argue that, given the dire state of the environment, the primary goal of environmentalists, including philosophers who work in environmental ethics, must be to work together to ensure that environmentally friendly policies are put into place. They must set aside their differences and not argue over their competing theoretical justifications of environmental policies, as that contributes to divisiveness among environmentalists and prevents this cooperation from occurring. The proposal to ignore disagreements over theory gets cashed out in three distinct (...)
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  3.  25
    To Swat or Not to Swat: Pesky Flies, Environmental Ethics, and the Supererogatory.Mark A. Michael - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (2):165-180.
    A central thesis of biocentrism is that all living things have intrinsic value. But when conflicts arise between the interests of humans and other organisms, this claim often has counterintuitive consequences. It would be wrong, for example, to swat pesky flies. Some biocentrists have responded by positing a taxonomy of interests in which human interests justifiably supersede those of other living things. I express doubts about whether this maneuver can succeed, and suggest that even if it does, it then commits (...)
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  4.  7
    Liberalism, Environmentalism, and the Principle of Neutrality.Mark A. Michael - 2000 - Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (1):39-56.
  5.  30
    How to Interfere with Nature.Mark A. Michael - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):135-154.
    The principle that we should not interfere with nature plays a prominent role in both popular and academic accounts of environmental ethics. For example, it is often cited to justify the claims that we should not actively manage wilderness areas and that we should not extinguish naturally occurring fires in those areas. It is far from clear, however, exactly what that principle entails for our treatment of species and ecosystems. Does all human interaction with nature amount to interference? If there (...)
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  6.  22
    International Justice and Wilderness Preservation.Mark A. Michael - 1995 - Social Theory and Practice 21 (2):149-176.
  7.  14
    Is There a Duty to Accept Punishment?Mark A. Michael - 1993 - Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (2):200-223.
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  8.  7
    Current Periodical Articles 897.Mark A. Michael - 1991 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (4).
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  9.  25
    Environmental Egalitarianism and 'Who Do You Save?' Dilemmas.Mark A. Michael - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (3):307 - 325.
    Some critics have understood environmental egalitarianism to imply that human and animal lives are generally equal in value, so that killing a human is no more objectionable than killing a dog. This charge should be troubling for anyone with egalitarian sympathies. I argue that one can distinguish two distinct versions of equality, one based on the idea of equal treatment, the other on the idea of equally valuable lives. I look at a lifeboat case where one must choose between saving (...)
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  10. Fraser Cowley, Metaphysical Delusion Reviewed By.Mark A. Michael - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (3):174-176.
     
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  11.  13
    Hugh P. McDonald, Ed. Pragmatism and Environmentalism.Mark A. Michael - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (1):119-120.
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  12.  11
    How to Interfere with Nature.Mark A. Michael - 2001 - Environmental Ethics 23 (2):135-154.
    The principle that we should not interfere with nature plays a prominent role in both popular and academic accounts of environmental ethics. For example, it is often cited to justify the claims that we should not actively manage wilderness areas and that we should not extinguish naturally occurring fires in those areas. It is far from clear, however, exactly what that principle entails for our treatment of species and ecosystems. Does all human interaction with nature amount to interference? If there (...)
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  13.  36
    Is It Natural to Drive Species to Extinction?Mark A. Michael - 2005 - Ethics and the Environment 10 (1):49-66.
    : Whether or not extinction caused by human activities is natural depends on which sense of the term 'natural' is under consideration. Given one sense of that term which has some grip on the popular imagination, it is. This suggests that at a minimum environmentalists should be very careful about invoking 'the natural' and related concepts such as 'acting naturally' when they propose moral principles. I argue here for the stronger claim that the 'natural' is either redundant and serves to (...)
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  14.  15
    Is Nonanthropocentrism Anti-Democratic?Mark Alan Michael - 2020 - Environmental Values 29 (1):9-28.
    Environmental pragmatists such as Ben Minteer and Bryan Norton have argued that there is an anti-democratic strain to be found in the work of some nonanthropocentrists. I examine three possible sources of the pragmatists' concern: the claim that nonanthropocentrists know the political truth, the claim that those who disagree with their basic principle should be excluded from discussions of policy and the claim that their basic principle is self-evident. I argue here that none of these claims are objectionably anti-democratic when (...)
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  15.  33
    Redistributive Taxation, Self‐Ownership and the Fruit of Labour.Mark A. Michael - 1997 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):137–146.
  16.  25
    To Swat or Not to Swat: Pesky Flies, Environmental Ethics, and the Supererogatory.Mark A. Michael - 1996 - Environmental Ethics 18 (2):165-180.
    A central thesis of biocentrism is that all living things have intrinsic value. But when conflicts arise between the interests of humans and other organisms, this claim often has counterintuitive consequences. It would be wrong, for example, to swat pesky flies. Some biocentrists have responded by positing a taxonomy of interests in which human interests justifiably supersede those of other living things. I express doubts about whether this maneuver can succeed, and suggest that even if it does, it then commits (...)
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  17.  27
    Why Not Interfere with Nature?Mark A. Michael - 2002 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):89-112.
    Advocates of an environmental ethic frequently claim that what makes an ethical theory truly and uniquely environmental is its commitment to the principle that environmental wholes such as species, ecosystems, and biotic communities are morally considerable. The prevailing view is that our primary duty towards these wholes is to respect their integrity, stability, and beauty, and that the best way to do this is to leave them alone, not interfere with them, and let nature follow its own course. But is (...)
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