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Rafael Ventura
University of Pennsylvania
  1.  42
    Ambiguous Signals, Partial Beliefs, and Propositional Content.Rafael Ventura - 2019 - Synthese 196 (7):2803-2820.
    As the content of propositional attitudes, propositions are usually taken to help explain the behavior of rational agents. However, a closer look at signaling games suggests otherwise: rational agents often acquire partial beliefs, and many of their signals are ambiguous. Signaling games also suggest that it is rational for agents to mix their behavior in response to partial beliefs and ambiguous signals. But as I show in this paper, propositions cannot help explain the mixing behavior of rational agents: to explain (...)
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  2.  1
    Entrepreneurial Profiles at the University: A Competence Approach.Sofía Louise Martínez-Martínez & Rafael Ventura - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The Entrepreneurial University plays a central role in entrepreneurial ecosystems and actively influences the development of entrepreneurial human capital, which is a critical asset for many economies. There is thus a requirement for the identification and strengthening of entrepreneurial competences, but no previous studies have included any analysis of these competences in the university context using an approach based on profiles. The present study fills this gap by investigating the existence of different entrepreneurial profiles among students, based on their competences. (...)
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  3.  25
    Multicellular Individuality: The Case of Bacteria.Rafael Ventura - 2019 - Biological Theory 14 (2):131-140.
    Recent attention to complex group-level behavior amongst bacteria has led some to conceive of multicellular clusters of bacteria as individuals. In this article, I assess these recent claims by first drawing a distinction between two concepts of individuality: physiological and evolutionary. I then survey cases that are representative of three different modes of growth: myxobacteria, Bacillus subtilis, and cyanobacteria. A closer look at these cases indicates that multicellular individuality among bacteria is remarkably complex. Physiologically, the three cases of multicellular clusters (...)
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  4.  12
    Quantitative Methods in Philosophy of Language.Rafael Ventura - 2019 - Philosophy Compass 14 (7).
    In this paper, I survey and defend the use of quantitative methods in philosophy of language. Quantitative methods in philosophy of language include a wide variety of methods, ranging from model‐based techniques (computer simulations and mathematical models) to data‐driven approaches (experimental philosophy and corpus‐based studies). After offering a few case studies of these methodologies in action, I single out some debates in philosophy of language that are especially well served by their use. These are cases in which quantitative methods increase (...)
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  5.  9
    Signaling in an Unknown World.Rafael Ventura - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    This paper proposes a sender-receiver model to explain two large-scale patterns observed in natural languages: Zipf’s inverse power law relating the frequency of word use and word rank, and the negative correlation between the frequency of word use and rate of lexical change. Computer simulations show that the model recreates Zipf’s inverse power law and the negative correlation between signal frequency and rate of change, provided that agents balance the rates with which they invent new signals and forget old ones. (...)
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  6.  14
    The Evolution of Cooperation in Finite Populations with Synergistic Payoffs.Rafael Ventura - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (4):43.
    In a series of papers, Forber and Smead :151–166, 2014, Biol Philos 30:405–421, 2015) and Smead and Forber :698–707, 2013) make a valuable contribution to the study of cooperation in finite populations by analyzing an understudied model: the prisoner’s delight. It always pays to cooperate in the one-shot prisoner’s delight, so this model presents a best-case scenario for the evolution of cooperation. Yet, what Forber and Smead find is highly counterintuitive. In finite populations playing the prisoner’s delight, increasing the benefit (...)
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