About this topic
Summary

Developmental Biology is the study of organisms’ life cycles from single cell to complex reproducing and aging multi-cellular organisms. It endeavours to explain phenomena such as: cellular differentiation (e.g. neurons vs. liver cells) and cellular aging, the development of gross morphology and anatomical structures (e.g. body shape and organs -eyes and limbs-), and the development of an organism as an integrated part of an eco-system (e.g. phenotypic plasticity). The philosophically relevant points, in addition to broader philosophy of science inquiries (e.g. confirmation and explanation) are those that have to do with the ontological status of biological kinds and with inter-level relations, specifically the integration of developmental biology with evolutionary biology and to a lesser extent, with ecology. Keeping this is in mind the subcategories within Developmental Biology can be grouped into three main themes: Evolution, Ecology and Ontology.    

Evolution

(Evolutionary-Developmental Biology, Developmental Constraints and Process Structuralism)

Ecology 

(Ecological Developmental Biology, Epigenetic Inheritance, Nature vs. Nurture and Innateness) 

and 

Ontology 

(Developmental Modularity, Developmental System Theory and Process Structuralism).

Key works Key works will be arranged by sub-category and cited there.
Related categories

1376 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 1376
Material to categorize
  1. Cell‐Cycle‐Dependent Regulation of Cell Adhesions: Adhering to the Schedule.Yitong Li & Keith Burridge - 2019 - Bioessays 41 (1):1800165.
    Focal adhesions disassemble during mitosis, but surprisingly little is known about how these structures respond to other phases of the cell cycle. Three recent papers reveal unexpected results as they examine adhesions through the cell cycle. A biphasic response is detected where focal adhesions grow during S phase before disassembly begins early in G2. In M phase, activated integrins at the tips of retraction fibers anchor mitotic cells, but these adhesions lack the defining components of focal adhesions, such as talin, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Nature of Programmed Cell Death.Pierre M. Durand & Grant Ramsey - forthcoming - Biological Theory:1-12.
    In multicellular organisms, cells are frequently programmed to die. This makes good sense: cells that fail to, or are no longer playing important roles are eliminated. From the cell’s perspective, this also makes sense, since somatic cells in multicellular organisms require the cooperation of clonal relatives. In unicellular organisms, however, programmed cell death poses a difficult and unresolved evolutionary problem. The empirical evidence for PCD in diverse microbial taxa has spurred debates about what precisely PCD means in the case of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Cancer Ecology: The Intracellular Interactome Makes Little Sense Without the Intercellular One.Andrew Moore - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (11):1800202.
  4. TGF‐Β Control of Adaptive Immune Tolerance: A Break From Treg Cells.Ming Liu & Shun Li - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (11):1800063.
    The vertebrate adaptive immune system has well defined functions in maintaining tolerance to self‐tissues. Suppression of autoreactive T cells is dependent on the regulatory cytokine transforming growth factor‐β (TGF‐β) and regulatory T (Treg) cells, a distinct T cell lineage specified by the transcription factor Foxp3. Although TGF‐β promotes thymic Treg (tTreg) cell development by repressing T cell clonal deletion and peripheral Treg cell differentiation by inducing Foxp3 expression, a recent study shows that TGF‐β suppresses autoreactive T cells independent of Foxp3+ (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. An Emerging System to Study Photosymbiosis, Brain Regeneration, Chronobiology, and Behavior: The Marine Acoel Symsagittifera Roscoffensis.Enrique Arboleda, Volker Hartenstein, Pedro Martinez, Heinrich Reichert, Sonia Sen, Simon Sprecher & Xavier Bailly - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (10):1800107.
  6. Formaliser le vivant : lois, théories, modèles.Franck Varenne - 2010 - Paris, France: Hermann.
    Peut-on formaliser le vivant ? Peut-on réduire une plante à une simple formule mathématique ? Goethe ne l’aurait pas admis. Pour beaucoup encore, cette question ne se pose même pas tant elle peut sembler provocante et contre-nature. Dans une perspective à la fois historique et épistémologique, ce livre rend compte de travaux contemporains qui ont pourtant tous tenté de braver cet interdit. -/- C’est en grande partie sur ce terrain, hautement problématique, que, dans les premières décennies du XXe siècle, on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Developmental Roles and Evolutionary Significance of AMPA‐Type Glutamate Receptors.Shinobu Hirai, Kohji Hotta & Haruo Okado - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800028.
    Organogenesis and metamorphosis require the intricate orchestration of multiple types of cellular interactions and signaling pathways. Glutamate (Glu) is an excitatory extracellular signaling molecule in the nervous system, while Ca2+ is a major intracellular signaling molecule. The first Glu receptors to be cloned are Ca2+‐permeable receptors in mammalian brains. Although recent studies have focused on Glu signaling in synaptic mechanisms of the mammalian central nervous system, it is unclear how this signaling functions in development. Our recent article demonstrated that Ca2+‐permeable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Actomyosin Cytoskeleton Drives Micron‐Scale Membrane Remodeling In Vivo Via the Generation of Mechanical Forces to Balance Membrane Tension Gradients.Seham Ebrahim, Jian Liu & Roberto Weigert - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800032.
    The remodeling of biological membranes is crucial for a vast number of cellular activities and is an inherently multiscale process in both time and space. Seminal work has provided important insights into nanometer‐scale membrane deformations, and highlighted the remarkable variation and complexity in the underlying molecular machineries and mechanisms. However, how membranes are remodeled at the micron‐scale, particularly in vivo, remains poorly understood. Here, we discuss how using regulated exocytosis of large (1.5–2.0 μm) membrane‐bound secretory granules in the salivary gland (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Sex Differences in Early Embryogenesis: Inter‐Chromosomal Regulation Sets the Stage for Sex‐Biased Gene Networks.Nora Engel - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (9):1800073.
    Sex‐specific transcriptional and epigenomic profiles are detectable in the embryo very soon after fertilization. I propose that in male (XY) and female (XX) pre‐implantation embryos sex chromosomes establish sexually dimorphic interactions with the autosomes, before overt differences become apparent and long before gonadogenesis. Lineage determination restricts expression biases between the sexes, but the epigenetic differences are less constrained and can be perpetuated, accounting for dimorphisms that arise later in life. In this way, sexual identity is registered in the epigenome very (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Mathematical Model and Simulation of Retina and Tectum Opticum of Lower Vertebrates.U. an der Heiden & G. Roth - 1987 - Acta Biotheoretica 36 (3):179-212.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Sex Cells Through the Phyla.Germilne Development. Ciba Foundation Symposium 182. Edited by JOANMARSHand JAMIEGOODE. J. Wiley & Sons, Chichester. Pp. Ix+321. £47.50. ISBN 0471 942642. [REVIEW]Paul Lasko - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (12):939-940.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Splitting: The Difference. Chromosome Segregation and Aneuploidy . Edited by BALDEV K. VIG. . Springer Verlag, NATO AS1 Series . 4. [REVIEW]Duncan J. Clarke - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (11):857-857.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Radical Solutions and Cultural Problems: Could Free Oxygen Radicals Be Responsible for the Impaired Development of Preimplantation Mammalian Embryos Invitro?Martin H. Johnson & Mohammad H. Nasresfahani - 1994 - Bioessays 16 (1):31-38.
    A major obstacel to the study of mammalian development, and to the practical application of knowledge gained from it in the clinic during therapeutic in vitro fertilisation and embryo transfer (IVF‐ET), is the propensity of embryos to become retarded or arrested during their culture in vitro. The precise developmental cell cycle in which embryos arrest or delay is characteristic for the species and coincides with the earliest period of embryonic gene expression. Much evidence reviewed here implicates free oxygen radicals (FORs) (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. The Energy Maintenance Theory of Aging: Maintaining Energy Metabolism to Allow Longevity.Snehal N. Chaudhari & Edward T. Kipreos - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1800005.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15. Asymmetric Segregation of Aged Spindle Pole Bodies During Cell Division: Mechanisms and Relevance Beyond Budding Yeast?Jette Lengefeld & Yves Barral - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1800038.
    Asymmetric cell division generates cell diversity and contributes to cellular aging and rejuvenation. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms enabling budding yeast to recognize spindle pole bodies (SPB, centrosome equivalent) based on their age, and guide their non‐random mitotic segregation: SPB inheritance requires the distinction of old from new SPBs and is regulated by the SPB‐inheritance network (SPIN) and the mitotic exit network (MEN). The SPIN marks the pre‐existing SPB as old and the MEN recognizes these marks translating them into (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Cells in the Non‐Uniform Magnetic World: How Cells Respond to High‐Gradient Magnetic Fields.Vitalii Zablotskii, Tatyana Polyakova & Alexandr Dejneka - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1800017.
    Imagine cells that live in a high‐gradient magnetic field (HGMF). Through what mechanisms do the cells sense a non‐uniform magnetic field and how such a field changes the cell fate? We show that magnetic forces generated by HGMFs can be comparable to intracellular forces and therefore may be capable of altering the functionality of an individual cell and tissues in unprecedented ways. We identify the cellular effectors of such fields and propose novel routes in cell biology predicting new biological effects (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Primary Cilia Reconsidered in the Context of Ciliopathies: Extraciliary and Ciliary Functions of Cilia Proteins Converge on a Polarity Theme?Kiet Hua & Russell J. Ferland - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1700132.
    Once dismissed as vestigial organelles, primary cilia have garnered the interest of scientists, given their importance in development/signaling, and for their implication in a new disease category known as ciliopathies. However, many, if not all, “cilia” proteins also have locations/functions outside of the primary cilium. These extraciliary functions can complicate the interpretation of a particular ciliopathy phenotype: it may be a result of defects at the cilium and/or at extraciliary locations, and it could be broadly related to a unifying cellular (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Archaea‐First and the Co‐Evolutionary Diversification of Domains of Life.James T. Staley & Gustavo Caetano‐Anollés - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (8):1800036.
    The origins and evolution of the Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya remain controversial. Phylogenomic‐wide studies of molecular features that are evolutionarily conserved, such as protein structural domains, suggest Archaea is the first domain of life to diversify from a stem line of descent. This line embodies the last universal common ancestor of cellular life. Here, we propose that ancestors of Euryarchaeota co‐evolved with those of Bacteria prior to the diversification of Eukarya. This co‐evolutionary scenario is supported by comparative genomic and phylogenomic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Stem Cell Epistemological Issues. Chapter in Charbord P and Durand C (Eds) Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine.Lucie Laplane - 2015 - River Publishers.
    This chapter brings a philosophical perspective to the concept of stem cell. Three general questions both clarify the concept of stem cell and emphasize its ambiguities: (1) How should we define stem cells? (2) What makes them different from non-stem cells? (3) What is their ontology? (i.e. what kind of property is “stemness”?) Following this last question, the Chapter distinguishes four conceptions of stem cells and highlights their respective consequences for the cancer stem cell theory. Determining what kind of property (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Mitochondrial Outer Membrane Channels: Emerging Diversity in Transport Processes.Thomas Becker & Richard Wagner - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (7):1800013.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Synapse Pruning: Mitochondrial ROS with Their Hands on the Shears.James N. Cobley - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (7):1800031.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Novel Channels of the Outer Membrane of Mitochondria: Recent Discoveries Change Our View.Vanessa Checchetto & Ildiko Szabo - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (6):1700232.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Demarcation of Viral Shelters Results in Destruction by Membranolytic GTPases: Antiviral Function of Autophagy Proteins and Interferon‐Inducible GTPases.Hailey M. Brown, Scott B. Biering, Allen Zhu, Jayoung Choi & Seungmin Hwang - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (6):1700231.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Physical Limits on the Precision of Mitotic Spindle Positioning by Microtubule Pushing Forces.Jonathon Howard & Carlos Garzon-Coral - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (11):1700122.
    Tissues are shaped and patterned by mechanical and chemical processes. A key mechanical process is the positioning of the mitotic spindle, which determines the size and location of the daughter cells within the tissue. Recent force and position-fluctuation measurements indicate that pushing forces, mediated by the polymerization of astral microtubules against­ the cell cortex, maintain the mitotic spindle at the cell center in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. The magnitude of the centering forces suggests that the physical limit on the accuracy and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Nanog Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells - An Ideal Model System to Dissect Enhancer Function.Steven Blinka & Sridhar Rao - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (12):1700086.
    Embryonic stem cells are derived from the preimplantation embryo and can differentiate into virtually any other cell type, which is governed by lineage specific transcriptions factors binding to cis regulatory elements to mediate changes in gene expression. The reliance on transcriptional regulation to maintain pluripotency makes ESCs a valuable model to study the role of distal CREs such as enhancers in modulating gene expression to affect cell fate decisions. This review will highlight recent advance on transcriptional enhancers, focusing on studies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. How to Lose the Plasmalemma? Lessons From Ciliates, Dinoflagellates and Euglenids.Andrzej Bodył - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (11):1700149.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. The Function of the Golgi Ribbon Structure - An Enduring Mystery Unfolds!Prajakta Gosavi & Paul A. Gleeson - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (11):1700063.
    The Golgi apparatus in vertebrate cells consists of individual Golgi stacks fused together in a continuous ribbon structure. The ribbon structure per se is not required to mediate the classical functions of this organelle and the relevance of the “ribbon” structure has been a mystery since first identified ultrastructurally in the 1950s. Recent advances recognize a role for the Golgi apparatus in a range of cellular processes, some mediated by signaling networks which are regulated at the Golgi. Here we review (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Linking Mitochondria and Synaptic Transmission: The CB1 Receptor.Marie-Ange Djeungoue-Petga & Etienne Hebert-Chatelain - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (12):1700126.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Too Much Eukaryote LGT.William F. Martin - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (12):1700115.
    The realization that prokaryotes naturally and frequently disperse genes across steep taxonomic boundaries via lateral gene transfer gave wings to the idea that eukaryotes might do the same. Eukaryotes do acquire genes from mitochondria and plastids and they do transfer genes during the process of secondary endosymbiosis, the spread of plastids via eukaryotic algal endosymbionts. From those observations it, however, does not follow that eukaryotes transfer genes either in the same ways as prokaryotes do, or to a quantitatively similar degree. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  30. Epigenetic and Transcriptional Variability Shape Phenotypic Plasticity.Simone Ecker, Vera Pancaldi, Alfonso Valencia, Stephan Beck & Dirk S. Paul - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (2):1700148.
    Epigenetic and transcriptional variability contribute to the vast diversity of cellular and organismal phenotypes and are key in human health and disease. In this review, we describe different types, sources, and determinants of epigenetic and transcriptional variability, enabling cells and organisms to adapt and evolve to a changing environment. We highlight the latest research and hypotheses on how chromatin structure and the epigenome influence gene expression variability. Further, we provide an overview of challenges in the analysis of biological variability. An (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31. Cell Size Control Via an Unstable Accumulating Activator and the Phenomenon of Excess Mitotic Delay.Nicholas Rhind - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (2):1700184.
    Unstable Accumulating Activator models for cellular size control propose an activator that accumulates in a size-dependent manner and triggers cell cycle progression once it has reached a certain threshold. Having a short half life makes such an activator responsive to changes in cell size and makes specific predictions for how cells respond to perturbation. In particular, it explains the curious phenomenon of excess mitotic delay. Excess mitotic delay, first observed in Tetrahymena in the '50s, is a phenomenon in which a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Identifying Human Naïve Pluripotent Stem Cells − Evaluating State‐Specific Reporter Lines and Cell‐Surface Markers.Amanda J. Collier & Peter J. Rugg-Gunn - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (5):1700239.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Demystifying Eukaryote Lateral Gene Transfer.Michelle M. Leger, Laura Eme, Courtney W. Stairs & Andrew J. Roger - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (5):1700242.
    In a recent BioEssays paper [W. F. Martin, BioEssays 2017, 39, 1700115], William Martin sharply criticizes evolutionary interpretations that involve lateral gene transfer into eukaryotic genomes. Most published examples of LGTs in eukaryotes, he suggests, are in fact contaminants, ancestral genes that have been lost from other extant lineages, or the result of artefactual phylogenetic inferences. Martin argues that, except for transfers that occurred from endosymbiotic organelles, eukaryote LGT is insignificant. Here, in reviewing this field, we seek to correct some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Perspectives on Integrating Developmental and Evolutionary Biology.Jonathan Kaplan - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (4):427-429.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Microbiome‐Germline Interactions and Their Transgenerational Implications.Michael Elgart & Yoav Soen - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (4):1700018.
    It is becoming increasingly clear that most, if not all, animals and plants are associated with a diverse array of resident gut microbiota. This symbiosis is regulated by host-microbiome interactions which influence the development, homeostasis, adaptation and evolution of the host. Recent evidence indicated that these interactions can also affect the host germline and have a potential of supporting transgenerational effects, including inheritance of acquired characteristics. Taken together, the influence of gut bacteria on the host soma and germline could potentially (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. The Rise of the Cartwheel: Seeding the Centriole Organelle.Paul Guichard, Virginie Hamel & Pierre Gönczy - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (4):1700241.
    The cartwheel is a striking structure critical for building the centriole, a microtubule-based organelle fundamental for organizing centrosomes, cilia, and flagella. Over the last 50 years, the cartwheel has been described in many systems using electron microscopy, but the molecular nature of its constituent building blocks and their assembly mechanisms have long remained mysterious. Here, we review discoveries that led to the current understanding of cartwheel structure, assembly, and function. We focus on the key role of SAS-6 protein self-organization, both (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Mitonuclear Mate Choice: A Missing Component of Sexual Selection Theory?Geoffrey E. Hill - 2018 - Bioessays 40 (3):1700191.
    The fitness of a eukaryote hinges on the coordinated function of the products of its nuclear and mitochondrial genomes in achieving oxidative phosphorylation. I propose that sexual selection plays a key role in the maintenance of mitonuclear coadaptation across generations because it enables pre-zygotic sorting for coadapted mitonuclear genotypes. At each new generation, sexual reproduction creates new combinations of nuclear and mitochondrial genes, and the potential arises for mitonuclear incompatibilities and reduced fitness. In reviewing the literature, I hypothesize that individuals (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Sechzehn Tage: Wann Beginnt Ein Menschliches Leben?Barry Smith & Berit Brogaard - 2006 - In G. Imaguirer & Christine Schneider (eds.), Untersuchungen zur Ontologie. Munich: Philosophia. pp. 3-40.
    Der Abschluß der Gastrulation, der gleichzeitig auch den Anfang der Neurulation bedeutet, ist die zeitliche Grenze, die Beginn eines menschlichen Individuums markiert. Oft wird behauptet, daß jegliche natürliche Veränderung stetig ist. Wie ist es dann aber möglich, eine zeitliche Grenze auszuzeichnen, an der ein menschliches Lebewesen zu existieren beginnt? Man beachte, was geschieht, wenn wir vom Thema zeitlicher Unstetigkeit zum räumlichen übergehen. Lebewesen haben räumliche Grenzen (wie sie durch ihre Haut geformt wird). Die letzteren sind genuine Diskontinuitäten, auch angesichts der (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Ontologie des Embryos: Wann Beginnt Menschliches Leben.Barry Smith & Berit Brogaard - 2007 - In L. Honnefelder & M. C. Schmidt (eds.), Naturalismus als Paradigma - Wie weit reicht die naturwissenschaftliche Erklärung des Menschen? , 2007,. Berlin: Berlin University Press. pp. 196-204.
    Der Abschluß der Gastrulation, der gleichzeitig auch den Anfang der Neurulation bedeutet, ist die zeitliche Grenze, die Beginn eines menschlichen Individuums markiert. Oft wird behauptet, daß jegliche natürliche Veränderung stetig ist. Wie ist es dann aber möglich, eine zeitliche Grenze auszuzeichnen, an der ein menschliches Lebewesen zu existieren beginnt? Man beachte, was geschieht, wenn wir vom Thema zeitlicher Unstetigkeit zum räumlichen übergehen. Lebewesen haben räumliche Grenzen (wie sie durch ihre Haut geformt wird). Die letzteren sind genuine Diskontinuitäten, auch angesichts der (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Managing Variation in the Investigation of Organismal Development: Problems and Opportunities.James W. E. Lowe - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (4):449-473.
    This paper aims to clarify the consequences of new scientific and philosophical approaches for the practical-theoretical framework of modern developmental biology. I highlight normal development, and the instructive-permissive distinction, as key parts of this framework which shape how variation is conceptualised and managed. Furthermore, I establish the different dimensions of biological variation: the units, temporality and mode of variation. Using the analytical frame established by this, I interpret a selection of examples as challenges to the instructive-permissive distinction. These examples include (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  41. Integrin-FAK-CDC42-PP1A Signaling Gnaws at YAP/TAZ Activity to Control Incisor Stem Cells.Hicks‐Berthet Julia & Varelas Xaralabos - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700116.
    How epithelial tissues are able to self-renew to maintain homeostasis and regenerate in response to injury remains a persistent question. The transcriptional effectors YAP and TAZ are increasingly being recognized as central mediators of epithelial stem cell biology, and a wealth of recent studies have been directed at understanding the control and activity of these factors. Recent work by Hu et al. has added to this knowledge, as they identify an Integrin-FAK-CDC42-PP1A signaling cascade that directs nuclear YAP/TAZ activity in stem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Linking Mitochondria and Synaptic Transmission: The CB1 Receptor.Djeungoue‐Petga Marie‐Ange & Hebert‐Chatelain Etienne - forthcoming - Bioessays.
    CB1 receptors are functionally present within brain mitochondria, although they are usually considered specifically targeted to plasma membrane. Acute activation of mtCB1 alters mitochondrial ATP generation, synaptic transmission, and memory performance. However, the detailed mechanism linking disrupted mitochondrial metabolism and synaptic transmission is still uncharacterized. CB1 receptors are among the most abundant G protein-coupled receptors in the brain and impact on several processes, including fear coping, anxiety, stress, learning, and memory. Mitochondria perform several key physiological processes for neuronal homeostasis, including (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. Coupling Immunity and Programmed Cell Suicide in Prokaryotes: Life-or-Death Choices.Eugene V. Koonin & Feng Zhang - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600186.
    Host‐pathogen arms race is a universal, central aspect of the evolution of life. Most organisms evolved several distinct yet interacting strategies of anti‐pathogen defense including resistance to parasite invasion, innate and adaptive immunity, and programmed cell death (PCD). The PCD is the means of last resort, a suicidal response to infection that is activated when resistance and immunity fail. An infected cell faces a decision between active defense and altruistic suicide or dormancy induction, depending on whether immunity is “deemed” capable (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Integrin and Cadherin Clusters: A Robust Way to Organize Adhesions for Cell Mechanics.Rishita Changede & Michael Sheetz - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600123.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Integrin and Cadherin Clusters: A Robust Way to Organize Adhesions for Cell Mechanics.Rishita Changede & Michael Sheetz - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (1):e201600123.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Zebrafish Adult Pigment Stem Cells Are Multipotent and Form Pigment Cells by a Progressive Fate Restriction Process.Robert N. Kelsh, Karen C. Sosa, Jennifer P. Owen & Christian A. Yates - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (3):1600234.
    Skin pigment pattern formation is a paradigmatic example of pattern formation. In zebrafish, the adult body stripes are generated by coordinated rearrangement of three distinct pigment cell‐types, black melanocytes, shiny iridophores and yellow xanthophores. A stem cell origin of melanocytes and iridophores has been proposed although the potency of those stem cells has remained unclear. Xanthophores, however, seemed to originate predominantly from proliferation of embryonic xanthophores. Now, data from Singh et al. shows that all three cell‐types derive from shared stem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. MAMs Are Attractive Targets for Bacterial Repurposing of the Host Cell.Pedro Escoll, Monica Rolando & Carmen Buchrieser - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (2):1600171.
    Pathogenic bacteria frequently target the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to exploit host functions. ER‐mitochondria inter‐organelle communication is topologically sub‐compartmentalized at mitochondria‐associated ER membranes (MAMs). MAMs are specific membranous microdomains with unique regulatory functions such as lipid synthesis and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial morphology, inflammasome activation, autophagosome formation, and apoptosis. These important cellular processes are all modulated by pathogens to subvert host functions and promote infection, thus it is tempting to assume that pathogenic bacteria target MAMs to subvert (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. MAMs Are Attractive Targets for Bacterial Repurposing of the Host Cell.Pedro Escoll, Monica Rolando & Carmen Buchrieser - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (2):1600171.
    Pathogenic bacteria frequently target the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to exploit host functions. ER‐mitochondria inter‐organelle communication is topologically sub‐compartmentalized at mitochondria‐associated ER membranes (MAMs). MAMs are specific membranous microdomains with unique regulatory functions such as lipid synthesis and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial morphology, inflammasome activation, autophagosome formation, and apoptosis. These important cellular processes are all modulated by pathogens to subvert host functions and promote infection, thus it is tempting to assume that pathogenic bacteria target MAMs to subvert (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Love is Like Oxygen.Neil W. Blackstone - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (2):1600257.
  50. Love is Like Oxygen.Neil W. Blackstone - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (2):1600257.
1 — 50 / 1376